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1 hour ago, RedskinsFanInSanAntonio said:

I have heard that end's take the longest to develop on defensive side of the ball. Even Galette mentioned on Twitter that Khalil Mack had only four sacks his rookie year, and Sweat has already five.

Mack was pretty dang good as a rookie. He only had four sacks because he was playing LB. He moved to DE his 2nd season and had 15 sacks.

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I am still hopeful about Montez Sweat though I feel like rookie mistakes by him and Steven Sims Jr. cost us the game yesterday.  That said rookies become second  year players and are better players for their mistakes.   Plus this is a year where losing almost helps us.

Edited by philibusters
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Sweat killed us yesterday he doesn’t even contain.  He ran straight to Peters chest what kind of technique is that? All the big plays were because Sweat couldn’t run around Peters the guy needs to be limited on snaps he is killing us and so is Collins. 

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11 hours ago, philibusters said:

I am still hopeful about Montez Sweat though I feel like rookie mistakes by him and Steven Sims Jr. cost us the game yesterday.  That said rookies become second  year players and are better players for their mistakes.   Plus this is a year where losing almost helps us.

I think both of these guys will be good players next year and beyond. Sweat needs a good offseason of adding strength and working on some moves....get him a coach who's played....Galette would be perfect. 

Sims is a weapon in the slot. Good find, coach him up.

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The thing is when they are playing 3-4...typically one of the two LBs are playing coverage otherwise you got 5 guys rushing every time just about when they play 3-4.  So either find edge LBs in the 3-4 who can cover or go full bore 4-3.  Guys like Cooley say this is a defense set for a 4-3 not a 3-4.  I get we are mostly in a 4-3 but the 30% or so time when they pay 3-4 your edge guys have to drop into coverage on occasion. 

 

 

 

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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I'm sure PFF keeps this stat, and maybe one of you scheme experts can elaborate, but how often do rush LBs in today's game drop into coverage in general?  Is 20% really a lot?  That doesn't seem all that out of the ordinary to me.  I just looked up, that in 2014 (just the first random year I could find and Mack's rookie year), Guys like Khalil Mack and Von Miller dropped into coverage 15-20% of the time during the season.

 

In fact, just last year, Khalil Mack dropped into coverage more than he rushed the QB in a game against the Patriots last year.  Dropped back 18 times, rushed 16 or something like that.  They wound up losing but it wasnt really because of that.

 

My question is, who's covering these people Sweat is covering if he isnt doing it? 

Edited by justice98
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5 hours ago, justice98 said:

I'm sure PFF keeps this stat, and maybe one of you scheme experts can elaborate, but how often do rush LBs in today's game drop into coverage in general?  Is 20% really a lot?  That doesn't seem all that out of the ordinary to me.  I just looked up, that in 2014 (just the first random year I could find), Guys like Khalil Mack and Von Miller dropped into coverage 15-20% of the time during thevseason.

 

In fact, just last year, Khalil Mack dropped into coverage more than he rushed the QB in a game against the Patriots last year.  Dropped back 18 times, rushed 16 or something like that.  They wound up losing but it wasnt really because of that.

 

My question is, who's covering these people Sweat is covering if he isnt doing it? 

 

I think that's the problem with the 3-4 today. Because it's such a pass happy league it basically forces you to go after more specific players, which was great when less teams ran it.

 

I believe ideally in a 4 man rush situation, one OLB is more suited to go after the QB than the other, who might drop into coverage, and vice versa. I think it depends on the scheme, and if dude is more of a big linebacker than a converted D-Lineman, making coverage more instinctive. Arent both Kerrigan and Sweat converted lineman? I think there's a reason the D has been playing a bit better with Anderson in there.

 

 

Edited by Mr. Sinister
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1 hour ago, Mr. Sinister said:

 

I think that's the problem with the 3-4 today. Because it's such a pass happy league it basically forces you to go after more specific players, which was great when less teams ran it.

 

I believe ideally in a 4 man rush situation, one OLB is more suited to go after the QB than the other, who might drop into coverage, and vice versa. I think it depends on the scheme, and if dude is more of a big linebacker than a converted D-Lineman, making coverage more instinctive. Arent both Kerrigan and Sweat converted lineman? I think there's a reason the D has been playing a bit better with Anderson in there.

 

 

 

Indeed, I agree with all of that.

 

I'm thinking Sweat just hasnt taken to the added responsibilities as an OLB.  Maybe he never will.  Which really isnt his fault. 

You draft a guy who was good with his hand in the dirt exclusively, then ask him to do stuff outside his skill set.  You get what you get.  The amount of stuff he probably has to think about that he never had to before probably slows him down.  

 

He looked like a beast in training camp and the preseason.  Once the real games started, he was stuck in molasses and the explosiveness disappeared.  

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12 minutes ago, justice98 said:

He looked like a beast in training camp and the preseason.  Once the real games started, he was stuck in molasses and the explosiveness disappeared.  

 

See I didnt watch any preseason,  so if that's the case, then it probably is an issue of too much information processing going on. That definitely slows you down, no matter what sport you are playing.

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7 hours ago, justice98 said:

I'm sure PFF keeps this stat, and maybe one of you scheme experts can elaborate, but how often do rush LBs in today's game drop into coverage in general?  Is 20% really a lot?  That doesn't seem all that out of the ordinary to me.  I just looked up, that in 2014 (just the first random year I could find and Mack's rookie year), Guys like Khalil Mack and Von Miller dropped into coverage 15-20% of the time during the season.

 

In fact, just last year, Khalil Mack dropped into coverage more than he rushed the QB in a game against the Patriots last year.  Dropped back 18 times, rushed 16 or something like that.  They wound up losing but it wasnt really because of that.

 

My question is, who's covering these people Sweat is covering if he isnt doing it? 


We've been dialing up a lot more simulated pressure these past few weeks which is probably the major reason for any up-tick in Sweat dropping into coverage. We'll show we're rushing 5-7 guys all on the line, but only rush 4 and mix up whose dropping into coverage to fool the offensive line's protection schemes and get a free rusher.

I was just reading a Mark Bullock piece that broke down a couple such plays. Moreland and Holcomb almost had a sack on Wentz because the line was expecting the edge to rush and ended up out of position and unable to re-set and block either one of them. 
 

 

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Give him another year, why not?  I really haven’t seen anything encouraging from him.  But we’ve been bitten so many times by letting good players get away.  But then, at the same time, we’ve had a lot of bad draft picks.  One more year.....and reevaluate....

 

pfffffffffff🙄

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You have to wonder why we're not seeing more from him but how do you judge a pass rusher in this defense when you see P. Smith leave and do what he's doing at Green Bay, it makes you wonder if its the scheme and coaching rather than the player.

 

Let's see what happens when we get a new D coordinator.

Edited by JSSkinz
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14 minutes ago, Bonez3 said:

I mean, Preston was down right average for 4 years in our D. Low and behold he's an absolute monster in reality. 

And crazy to think this Lill' ole tater must have been the only one to have seen how big of a monster he could have been for the skins.

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This guy started playing so much faster as the season progressed. I hope this new staff maximizes his talents. I am super excited for him, considering how low I was on the guy the first half of the season.

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Good, informative article on Sweat’s progression in 2019 that I read a few weeks ago. Q&A with Grimm, his former position coach:

 

https://www.redskins.com/news/montez-sweat-development-rookie-campaign-redskins-q-and-a

 

Question: How would you ­evaluate his performance based on the expectations coming into the year?

 

Chad Grimm: Well, the expectations were always high with the high draft pick, first-round pick.

 

I don't think you can ever just look at the stats and say that this guy is this good because he had this number of sacks or whatever that may be. I always think of Khalil Mack.

 

Defensive line is a tough position early on in a career having to deal with those big offensive tackles who have been playing a long time. It is a developing position. But I think just to go with the synopsis of his entire season, I think the first thing you have to look at is that he started every single game, which is an extreme accomplishment on its own [with] just the physicality and the number of reps and the number of hits. For a young rookie to be able to start every game and be dependable, I think that's an accomplishment on its own.

 

Looking back at the whole year, I think he was above average by far versus the run. He was a physical presence, he set a good edge, which is one of the hardest things for a young defensive end to do. So, I thought he showed great physicality, toughness in those kinds of situations versus the run.

 

And I think if you look from the first couple weeks of the season -- we played Dallas Week 2 and now we're playing them the last game of the year, so we obviously see that film again -- I think the development of his rush is solid progress.

 

How fast someone develops, you never really know. I'm a third-year outside linebacker coach, so by no means do I think I'm the best in the league. So, do you say, "Oh, well if he had the absolute best, what would he look like?" I don't know. You don't know. You just have to take what you see, see the growth, see the continued development and feel good about that, and I think if you see his progression as far as his angles in the rush, his pad level -- the use of his hands is probably the biggest thing – he's had a solid progression, and I think he's off to a great start for his career.
 

Q: Where do you think he made the biggest strides as a pass-rusher, and what does he need to do to take that next step forward?

 

Grimm: He was pretty raw. He relied on pure physical ability in college. Obviously, he's a 4.4 [second] 40 [yard dash] guy, so he'd just get off the ball and he'd be around tackles simply with his get off and his burst.

 

In the NFL, there's a lot of great defensive ends that have the same burst, the same speed, that kind of thing. You have to win with more than just your natural attributes. You have to win with hands, you have to win with your angle, you have to win with your pad level – all of those kinds of things. In college, you can be great at one thing and you win with natural ability, but it doesn't work in the NFL like that.

 

It's tough to knock him because he was winning all of the time in college simply by just getting off the ball, so he had to develop those attributes. He's been working on them, and it's something that defensive ends continually build. Even Ryan Kerrigan, still, is working on different ways to work his hands to improve his rush ability.

 

It's a never-ending process, but [Sweat] understands that, which is the first thing towards growth or correcting the issues. So, he's made a strong point to emphasize and work on his hands and continue to grow as a rusher, and I think you can see that at the later end of the season versus the first.

 

Like I said, in college, he was beating guys with just pure get off. And now he has a little bit of a foot freeze and a long arm. He can still win with speed, obviously, since that's his best attribute. But he's developed a variety of tools that he's starting to use, and you can see it starting to translate into his game.

 

It's probably a little tough for [Sweat], I can imagine, but he's a very heady player. He watches more film than most guys, and I see him all the time just sitting around here, watching tape, watching tackles, how they set, and that's the other biggest thing: he understands where he needs to raise him game, and then he also puts in the work with it. That's 90% of the monster to defeat and to overcome, so I think he's going to be a really good football player.

 

Like I said, defensive line is usually one of the harder positions to come in and be a big impactful player, and so I think he's got a solid platform to stand on. I think with his rookie year, everyone will look back on it as far as evaluating and say, "That was a really solid first step."

 

It's still going to come down on him to continue to grow and to continue to put in the work like he has been, but everything I've seen from him leads me to believe that he's going to go on and make great strides in the coming years.

 

And usually that's how it works. Khalil Mack and guys like that, if you look at just the numbers you would say very so-so I guess -- I think [Mack] had 4.5 [sacks] his rookie year. But then he just took off from there. So, there's no telling with a guy like [Sweat]. When it clicks in his mind and he finally gets it completely and he's still putting in the work like he is, he'll take off and be a big-time player.

 

Q: People do not even think about switching sides or switching stances. Not many people take into account how much those things matter.

 

Grimm: It's so hard. When anything you ever do is put your right hand in the ground and look at the ball and get off on the ball, well now you're standing up and who knows, what your assignment is going to dictate where your eyes need to be. Where he's only had one thing he ever worried about, which was putting his right hand in the ground and getting off on the snap. Now, all of the sudden, he might have, throughout our defense, he's probably got 50 to 100 different schemes of where his eyes need to be, where his alignment is, what he's focusing on and what he's seeing, and all of that stuff is completely new to him.

 

Q: People do not even think about switching sides or switching stances. Not many people take into account how much those things matter.

 

Grimm: It's so hard. When anything you ever do is put your right hand in the ground and look at the ball and get off on the ball, well now you're standing up and who knows, what your assignment is going to dictate where your eyes need to be. Where he's only had one thing he ever worried about, which was putting his right hand in the ground and getting off on the snap. Now, all of the sudden, he might have, throughout our defense, he's probably got 50 to 100 different schemes of where his eyes need to be, where his alignment is, what he's focusing on and what he's seeing, and all of that stuff is completely new to him.

 

And then on top of that, whereas a college team normally has three or four different schemes defensively, with an NFL team you're talking about 20 to 30. So, he's constantly new things and then understanding not just his spot but the 10 around him, which helps him understand how to do his job better.

 

It's a lot of learning, a lot of new stuff and I think you can tell how intelligent he is because he's picked it up fairly well. I've been pleasantly surprised and happy with his growth and his development mentally with the schemes as much as anything.


Q: Lastly, what do you think Sweat can do this offseason to maximize his growth entering Year 2 in the NFL?

 

 

Grimm: The biggest thing for him is to continue that growth and gains in the weight room. Strength is always a big deal. You're playing against the best tackles who typically are five-, six-, seven-year guys who have been working out in an [NFL] weight room that long. So strength and conditioning, obviously.

 

Also, he's flexible, but he's got a little bit of hip stiffness that he can continue to loosen up, like everyone. Yoga is a big thing we always emphasize to these guys, just loosening himself acrobatically.

And it's just doing different drills or athletic-type movements in space. Maybe dropping and running angles and re-directing and stuff like that. Just stuff that he was typically never asked to do. Besides rushing, those athletic movements and continuing to grow with those. That will help him in everything he does.

 

Strength is the biggest, continuing to work on becoming as flexible and nimble and as loose as he can become and then the continued development of his rush hands.

 

When he was coming out of college, his [rush hands] weren't a knock on him because he was beating people with pure speed. But now he realizes and everyone realizes that you can't do that in the NFL because of the talent level, so just the continued growth of working his hands, getting the tackles' hands down and different things he does on that end.

 

Physically, his burst, his get off, all of that stuff is already phenomenal, so I think if he just fine tunes a couple of aspects of his flexibility and his rush and just the hands, he'll be, I believe, a Pro Bowl-caliber defensive end. It's just a matter of how fast that comes.

Edited by HTTRDynasty
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