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Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired


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And that is why I have a problem with the "They're all good cops except a few bad apples" narrative.  

 

Hopefully, this story indicates that that's starting to change.  

 

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Video shows South Carolina deputies repeatedly tasing Black man before he dies in jail

 

Officials in South Carolina on Friday released hours of body-worn camera footage and details about the final hours of the life of Jamal Sutherland, a Black man who died in January after he was pepper-sprayed and electroshocked with a taser in his jail cell.

 

Sutherland, 31, was arrested on Jan. 4 after a "large scale fight" broke out at a psychiatric facility where he was receiving mental health treatment, according to a statement from North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey. He said the city police department did its job delivering Sutherland "safely" from the facility to the jail.

 

The next morning, Charleston County sheriff's deputies attempted to remove Sutherland from his cell for a bond hearing.

 

In the video, two sheriff's deputies are outside Sutherland's jail cell and one deploys a taser, or stun gun, and appears to use it repeatedly as Sutherland cries out in pain and writhes on the floor.

 

A timeline of events published by WBCD, an NBC affiliate in Charleston, indicated pepper spray was also deployed. Sutherland was pronounced dead one hour and 15 minutes after the deputies first tried to remove him from his cell and after nearly an hour of resuscitation attempts.

 

The county coroner's office said an autopsy showed the cause of death as “excited state with adverse pharmacotherapeutic effect during subdual process," according to WBCD.

 

Click on the link for the full article and video

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The Police Dog Who Cried Drugs at Every Traffic Stop

 

Cops laugh about “probable cause on four legs” but the damage to innocent lives is real.
 

Don't blame Karma. The police dog simply followed his training when he helped local agencies impound vehicles that sometimes belonged to innocent motorists in Republic, Washington, an old mining town near the Canadian border.

 

As a drug detection dog, Karma kept his nose down and treated every suspect the same. Public records show that from the time he arrived in Republic in January 2018 until his handler took a leave of absence to campaign for public office in 2020, Karma gave an "alert" indicating the presence of drugs 100 percent of the time during roadside sniffs outside vehicles.

 

Whether drivers actually possessed illegal narcotics made no difference. The government gained access to every vehicle that Karma ever sniffed. He essentially created automatic probable cause for searches and seizures, undercutting constitutional guarantees of due process.

 

Similar patterns abound nationwide, suggesting that Karma's career was not unusual. Lex, a drug detection dog in Illinois, alerted for narcotics 93 percent of the time during roadside sniffs, but was wrong in more than 40 percent of cases. Sella, a drug detection dog in Florida, gave false alerts 53 percent of the time. Bono, a drug detection dog in Virginia, incorrectly indicated the presence of drugs 74 percent of the time.

 

Despite the frequent errors, courts typically treat certified narcotics dogs as infallible, allowing law enforcement agencies to use them like blank permission slips to enter vehicles, open suitcases, and rummage through purses.

 

The Institute for Justice, a libertarian public interest law firm, shows a financial motive for the snooping in its 2020 report, Policing for Profit. Local, state, and federal agencies have raked in more than $68.8 billion in proceeds since 2000 through a process called civil forfeiture.

 

Click on the link for the full article

 

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8 hours ago, China said:

Lex, a drug detection dog in Illinois, alerted for narcotics 93 percent of the time during roadside sniffs, but was wrong in more than 40 percent of cases.

 

so... nearly 60 % of ALL cars had narcotics in them?   WTF?      

 

( note that MJ is NOT a narcotic.... and i am going to assume that this is just sloppy language/reporting ...    either the stat is just wrong/misrepresented... or it should've led the reporter to dig a little deeper and figure out what was going on here?  in either case  it is the sort of line that makes me shrug off articles overall. )

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8 hours ago, mcsluggo said:

 

so... nearly 60 % of ALL cars had narcotics in them?   WTF?      

 

 

60% of cars searched by the dog.

 

They usually only bring out the dog if they have suspicion. And i guess 40% of the time they just want a BS reason to search your car.

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3 hours ago, Mooka said:

 

60% of cars searched by the dog.

 

They usually only bring out the dog if they have suspicion. And i guess 40% of the time they just want a BS reason to search your car.

100% of the time they want a BS reason to search your car. 60% of the time they either got lucky, or were able to fake enough evidence that it's the same thing.

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Surprised this hasn't been posted yet.

 

Quote

Pasquotank DA says deputies were ‘justified’ in killing of Andrew Brown Jr.

ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (WAVY) — Pasquotank County District Attorney R. Andrew Womble claimed the law enforcement killing of Andrew Brown Jr. last month was “justified” as he shared the results of an independent investigation by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation on Tuesday.

Womble said the three deputies that fired their weapons, Investigator Daniel Meads, Deputy Robert Morgan and Cpl. Aaron Lewellyn, won’t face charges.

“While tragic, the shooting of Mr. Brown was justified due to his actions,” Womble said.

More at link.....

https://www.wavy.com/andrew-brown/pasquotank-da-holding-press-conference-tuesday-on-investigation-into-death-of-andrew-brown-jr/?fbclid=IwAR2iPvnyb5fVyzLwi-GDqErZ-xC9kzLNjOLIlOzCbwVPoJM4WvUTMITiNF8

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On 5/17/2021 at 9:38 AM, mcsluggo said:

so... nearly 60 % of ALL cars had narcotics in them?   WTF? 

 

Nope.  

 

60% of cars where the cops had a hunch.  

 

Which might mean that the cop's hunches are more accurate than I would have given them credit for.  

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22 minutes ago, Larry said:

 

Nope.  

 

60% of cars where the cops had a hunch.  

 

Which might mean that the cop's hunches are more accurate than I would have given them credit for.  

Or they "found" evidence often enough to make it look good.

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21 hours ago, Mooka said:

 

60% of cars searched by the dog.

 

They usually only bring out the dog if they have suspicion. And i guess 40% of the time they just want a BS reason to search your car.

 

So basically 93 out of 100 cars sniffed returned a positive, then 40 percent of those positives were actually a negative, so 36 of the 93 were false positives, and 57 were true positives.  Of the true positives, only 50% were bull**** reasons anyway, which means the out of the original 100, only 28.5 were really positive.  And out of those 28.5, all of them were for marijuana which we all know you can smoke and drive as long as you even it out with a couple beers.  So ZERO positives. 

 

This was a very, very bad dog.

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29 minutes ago, kfrankie said:

 

So basically 93 out of 100 cars sniffed returned a positive, then 40 percent of those positives were actually a negative, so 36 of the 93 were false positives, and 57 were true positives.  Of the true positives, only 50% were bull**** reasons anyway, which means the out of the original 100, only 28.5 were really positive.  And out of those 28.5, all of them were for marijuana which we all know you can smoke and drive as long as you even it out with a couple beers.  So ZERO positives. 

 

This was a very, very bad dog.

 

m6D5Qp.gif

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1 hour ago, dfitzo53 said:

Or they "found" evidence often enough to make it look good.


A reasoning that I won't rule out. Just not jumping to that conclusion. 

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2 hours ago, Larry said:


A reasoning that I won't rule out. Just not jumping to that conclusion. 

I'm not jumping to that conclusion either, just mentioning that I think police have lost themselves the benefit of the doubt.

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Feds: How problem Highland Park cop got busted dealing fentanyl-laced heroin

 

A Highland Park detective charged with selling fentanyl-laced heroin this week isn't new to controversy: She was fired more than a decade ago by the Wayne County sheriff's office for allegedly fraternizing with felons and helping them smuggle drugs into prison.

 

"The Sheriff also assisted the prisoners in depositing money into other prisoner's accounts," court records state, "(and allowed) civilians to come to her home to speak with the prisoners on cellphones." 

 

This is some of the storied past of Detective Tiffany Lipkovitch, 45, of Grosse Pointe, who was charged in federal court Wednesday with selling fentanyl-laced heroin while working for the Highland Park Police Department, where she has been employed since 2011.

 

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Texas Deputies Say They Were 'Molested and Traumatized' by Colleagues During Federally Funded Prostitution Stings

 

Texas "'bachelor party' prostitution stings soon grew into a booze-fueled playground for sexual exploitation," claims a new lawsuit. Several high-ranking Harris County law enforcement officers are accused of sexually assaulting and harassing their female colleagues under the guise of stopping human trafficking. In a new federal lawsuit, women currently or formerly employed with the Harris County Constable's Office accuse Precinct 1 Constable Alan Rosen, Assistant Chief Chris Gore, and Lieutenant Shane Rigdon of having "molested and traumatized" them in the course of conducting prostitution stings paid for by the federal government.

 

Rosen, Gore, and Rigdon are the leaders of the department's federally funded human trafficking unit, notes the lawsuit, calling the unit "an opportunity for notoriety and media attention." Like so many of its kind, it considers entrapping sex workers via undercover prostitution stings to be the main part of its mission. The unit commonly has cops pose as "johns" to get sex workers to agree to illegal acts. They then arrest them under the misguided theory that most sex workers are forced into it and if you only arrest enough of them, someone will give up "their sex traffic business handlers."

 

Yet the suit presents no suggestion that any "sex traffic business handlers" or "human trafficking" rings were ever stopped (the unit did "not focus on solving cases at all," it states), merely that sex workers—and at least one minor—were harassed by police and then arrested afterward. Several female cops were allegedly subjected to similar abuse and mistreatment, only without the arrests at the end.

 

These female deputies—Liz Gomez, Marissa Sanchez, and Felecia McKinney—were selected for undercover operations with the unit "under the guise of legitimate police work" and subsequently harassed and mistreated "by their intoxicated male commanding officers," states the lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas:

 

Quote

What began as an idea for "bachelor party" prostitution stings soon grew into a booze-fueled playground for sexual exploitation in which young, untrained deputies were subject to disgusting abuse. Both Constable Rosen and the Harris County District Attorney's Office have known about this abuse for months, but they refused to take any action and rebuffed anyone who complained. Constable Alan Rosen attended at least one of these "parties" personally. Three of the young deputies spoke up about their abuse to their supervisors at the Constable's Office, including Constable Rosen's chief of staff, but they were ridiculed by their commanders, retaliated against by their abusers, and quietly reassigned to less prestigious duties.

 

In addition, Jacquelyn Aluotto, a "human trafficking advocate" employed by the county (and the fourth plaintiff in this suit) spoke up about went what on as part of these undercover operations and was fired the day after giving an interview to the office's Internal Affairs division, the suit says.

 

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I wonder what the laws are regarding Narcotics canines alerting officers of the presence of drugs versus the officers actually having to produce the drugs in a search.   I don't think any vehicle should ever be impounded based on a dog's nose.  If a dog alerts the presence of drugs, then the officers on scene either need to find narcotics or let the person be on their way.

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Judge dismisses Phoenix protest gang charges, blasts prosecution

 

A Maricopa County Superior Court judge has permanently dismissed gang charges against more than a dozen police protesters in a scathing ruling that found the Phoenix Police Department and Maricopa County Attorney’s Office colluded to lie to the grand jury.

 

The felony gang charges against more than a dozen defendants arrested during an October protest were dismissed with prejudice by Judge Jennifer Ryan-Touhill on June 3.

 

 

In her ruling, Ryan-Touhill found that a key sergeant, Doug McBride, and the case’s lead prosecutor, April Sponsel, engaged in “egregious misconduct” and said portions of their case were “absurd," “ridiculous,” “disingenuous,” and “baffling.”

 

According to the judge's order: “Both Sgt. McBride and Ms. Sponsel colluded in their efforts to present the grand jury with false information regarding a non-existent gang."

 

ABC15 has spent months exposing a series of exaggerations, lies, and dubious evidence in protest cases brought by Phoenix police and county prosecutors throughout 2020.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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On 6/7/2021 at 8:31 PM, China said:

Judge dismisses Phoenix protest gang charges, blasts prosecution

 

A Maricopa County Superior Court judge has permanently dismissed gang charges against more than a dozen police protesters in a scathing ruling that found the Phoenix Police Department and Maricopa County Attorney’s Office colluded to lie to the grand jury.

 

The felony gang charges against more than a dozen defendants arrested during an October protest were dismissed with prejudice by Judge Jennifer Ryan-Touhill on June 3.

 

 

In her ruling, Ryan-Touhill found that a key sergeant, Doug McBride, and the case’s lead prosecutor, April Sponsel, engaged in “egregious misconduct” and said portions of their case were “absurd," “ridiculous,” “disingenuous,” and “baffling.”

 

According to the judge's order: “Both Sgt. McBride and Ms. Sponsel colluded in their efforts to present the grand jury with false information regarding a non-existent gang."

 

ABC15 has spent months exposing a series of exaggerations, lies, and dubious evidence in protest cases brought by Phoenix police and county prosecutors throughout 2020.

 

Click on the link for the full article

Sounds like those cops belong in prison.

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On 5/17/2021 at 9:38 AM, mcsluggo said:

 

so... nearly 60 % of ALL cars had narcotics in them?   WTF?      

 

( note that MJ is NOT a narcotic.... and i am going to assume that this is just sloppy language/reporting ...    either the stat is just wrong/misrepresented... or it should've led the reporter to dig a little deeper and figure out what was going on here?  in either case  it is the sort of line that makes me shrug off articles overall. )


60 percent of the ones he searched. Meaning that the cops already thought there was drugs in the car. Cop probably isn’t doing a sniff test on Karen and her kids heading to soccer practice.

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