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Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired


Dan T.
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7 hours ago, China said:

Off-Duty Rhode Island Cop Under Investigation For Shooting Teen Driver Leaving Pizzeria Parking Lot

 

A police officer in Rhode Island who shot an allegedly unarmed teenage driver while off-duty Wednesday evening has been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation, several news outlets reported this week.

 

A surveillance camera in the parking lot of Wicked Good Pizza in West Greenwich revealed some of what happened in the moments before Pawtucket Police Officer Daniel Dolan fired at a car carrying three teenagers, hitting the driver in the arm.

 

 

The footage, first obtained by Providence, R.I. ABC affiliate WLNE-TV, shows a black Audi sedan being driven by an 18-year-old male driver slowly pull into the pizzeria parking with a white pickup truck in close pursuit. After entering the lot, the truck goes around the left side of the Audi, cutting the vehicle off in a police-style maneuver. Dolan immediately exits the vehicle and appears to draw a handgun from a waist holster. The Audi goes into reverse and retreats from the parking lot with Dolan, gun pointed at the car, following close behind. The car and Dolan exit the frame for a few seconds; Dolan runs back to his truck and quickly exits the lot in the same direction as the Audi.

 

The state Office of the Attorney General on Thursday announced that the office, as well as the Rhode Island State Police and the West Greenwich Police Department, were jointly investigating the matter.

 

The AG’s press release stated that Dolan was off duty and traveling home on Route 95 Wednesday evening when he “encountered a black Audi sedan occupied by a driver and two passengers” and “attempted to detain the driver of the Audi.”

 

“In the ensuing moments, the details of which remain under investigation, Officer Dolan discharged his firearm, striking the driver of the Audi in the arm,” the release stated.

 

The teen, who has not been identified, was transported to Rhode Island Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

 

An attorney representing the three teens, two of whom are brothers, told WLNE-TV that there were no weapons in the Audi and none of the teens were aware that Dolan was a police officer.

 

Click on the link for the full article


The video is pretty clear. Looks like your standard case of road rage to me. Think god the cop is a bad shot. 

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40 minutes ago, mammajamma said:

watched the video. i'm still trying to comprehend why the shooter wasn't arrested (just "placed on admin leave"). he wasn't on-duty or threatened (he literally chased after the car with his gun), so none of the usual cops weak-ass excuses for murdering people even apply here

Because police unions have created rules that govern discipline and such

 

On our watch is an npr podcast that gives pretty good insight into how the system got this way. It’s mostly driven by the unions and things like police bill of rights and such 

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2 hours ago, tshile said:

Because police unions have created rules that govern discipline and such

 

On our watch is an npr podcast that gives pretty good insight into how the system got this way. It’s mostly driven by the unions and things like police bill of rights and such 

No i get the fact that police get away with murdering people almost every day, but this cop wasn't even on duty or doing police business. He blatantly committed a life-endangering felony without having the cop excuse. 

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A Teen Was Having Car Trouble. A Sheriff’s Deputy Shot and Killed Him.


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Lonoke County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Michael Davis stopped 17-year-old Hunter Brittain near Cabot, Arkansas, at about 3 a.m. last Wednesday, and it’s still unclear why. Hunter had been having trouble with his truck when Davis pulled in behind him outside of a local auto repair shop and flashed his emergency lights, according to the account of a 16-year-old riding with Hunter at the time. When Hunter went to put the antifreeze behind his back tire so his vehicle wouldn’t roll into the officer’s, Davis allegedly fired at him. 
 

After Davis fired, Hunter “sustained a gunshot wound and was transported to a North Little Rock hospital, where he later died,” the Arkansas State Police said in a short statement last week.

https://www.vice.com/en/article/5db5qa/hunter-brittain-arkansas-teen-holding-antifreeze-shot-killed-sheriffs-deputy

 

 

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7 hours ago, mammajamma said:

No i get the fact that police get away with murdering people almost every day, but this cop wasn't even on duty or doing police business. He blatantly committed a life-endangering felony without having the cop excuse. 

I don’t think your version of “off duty” matches that way many law enforcement areas define “off duty”

 

in many areas just because you’re not on the clock doesn’t mean you don’t have the ability/duty to enforce the law. 

 

where I live, for example, law enforcement officers were/are allowed/required to enforce the law even when they’re off the clock, out of their official jurisdiction, or out of their official set of duties (ie: and off duty investigator for something specific can (and in some places is required) to stop a drunk driver while in a different county, even though they’re off duty, not in their county of employment, and not a patrol cop)

 

Now… no one really likes a person that runs around doing that, as it was explained to me, so you’re supposed to have a *really* good reason for it (drunk driver is the usual example because that is something that resonates with everyone)

 

this is really my chief complaint with the people demanding reform and such. For the most part most of them don’t really seem to know much of anything about the rules, the training, etc, yet they form really strong opinions when they state their demands or critiques of a situation. 
 

it doesn’t make anything about the situation ‘right’ but it very well may explain why the situation is being handled in a way that doesn’t make sense to you. 

Edited by tshile
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Just imagine how you’d feel if a family of 5 was killed because they were hit by a drunk driver at 10pm on their way to the beach, and a sheriffs deputy saw and identified the driver as drunk 20 minutes earlier, but decided “I’m off duty, I’m going home”


it just isn’t that cut and dry. In some regards/areas they’re never “off duty”. 
 

many of them carry their service weapon 24/7 solely because they realize being off duty doesn’t mean they can just sit by passively when something egregious is going on right in front of them. 
 

Ps - I absolutely had a run in with an off duty officer, out of his official jurisdiction 
 

and him being off duty didn’t really prevent how that went down. And no, no one along the way ever stopped and questioned anything about the issue because the person that initiated contact with me was off duty. It doesn’t work that way. At least not everywhere. 

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9 minutes ago, tshile said:

this is really my chief complaint with the people demanding reform and such. For the most part most of them don’t really seem to know much of anything about the rules, the training, etc,...
 

it doesn’t make anything about the situation ‘right’ but it very well explain why the situation is being handled in a way that doesn’t make sense to you. 

Not totally @tshile, most jurisdictions require an on duty officer be called before engaging a  suspect unless the situation is life threatening. This guy was acting as if he was a state trooper or federal agent, LEOS have to communicate that they are representing the law as officials in word and/or with uniform.

Edited by ClaytoAli
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3 minutes ago, ClaytoAli said:

Not totally @tshile, most jurisdictions require an on duty officer be called before engaging a  suspect unless the situation is life threatening. This guy was acting as if he was a state trooper or federal agent, LEOS have to communicate that they are representing the law as officials. 

Most eh?

 

so you know the state and local laws across the whole country? You know the standing orders and police bill of rights/etc for most jurisdictions?

 

Or are you just telling me what you think is the case, without actually knowing?

 

im telling you about where I live. Because that’s the only place I know (some of) the rules. 
 

I’m also telling you, as someone who grew up in law enforcement circles, that this is allowed in my state. 
 

and I’m also telling you I was personally arrested by an off duty sheriffs deputy outside of his county of employment. 
 

you need to know the rules of the area you’re talking about before you start telling everyone else what was/isn’t right. 
 

and none of this is to excuse what the officer did 

 

it’s just to explain (maybe) why it’s being handled the way it’s being handled. 

Edited by tshile
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Just now, tshile said:

I’m also telling you I was personally arrested by an off duty sheriffs deputy outside of his county of employment. 


thug! lol

 

I get it, but these requirements are very uniformed across state and local jurisdictions.

 

....I’m similar to you in experience with the popo 👮‍♂️, just mine were on duty and were very nice people (if what I say every gets out).

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5 hours ago, tshile said:

I don’t think your version of “off duty” matches that way many law enforcement areas define “off duty”

 

in many areas just because you’re not on the clock doesn’t mean you don’t have the ability/duty to enforce the law. 

 

where I live, for example, law enforcement officers were/are allowed/required to enforce the law even when they’re off the clock, out of their official jurisdiction, or out of their official set of duties (ie: and off duty investigator for something specific can (and in some places is required) to stop a drunk driver while in a different county, even though they’re off duty, not in their county of employment, and not a patrol cop)


 

 

 

that sounds really dangerous. How is anyone supposed to tell the difference between a real cop and a nut job pointing a gun at them if they aren’t in uniform?

 

5 hours ago, tshile said:

this is really my chief complaint with the people demanding reform and such. For the most part most of them don’t really seem to know much of anything about the rules, the training, etc, yet they form really strong opinions when they state their demands or critiques of a situation. 
 

 

Because they want the rules changed because the rules result in bad outcomes.  You don’t have to “know the rules” to know if something is bad or not.

 

5 hours ago, tshile said:

 

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1 hour ago, CousinsCowgirl84 said:

 

 

that sounds really dangerous. How is anyone supposed to tell the difference between a real cop and a nut job pointing a gun at them if they aren’t in uniform?

 

 

Because they want the rules changed because the rules result in bad outcomes.  You don’t have to “know the rules” to know if something is bad or not.

 


Look. I’m not arguing it’s a great idea. I’m just saying it’s a thing in some places. 
 

and to the second point - it usually doesn’t work out too well when someone is demanding systemic changes, and making severe critiques of a system, and they don’t understand the system. 

 

there’s a difference between a bad person, and a bad policy/training/law. 
 

if you’re interested in changing things then it’s important to understand the difference. Otherwise you look like someone who doesn’t know what they’re talking about and/or you may be asking for bad ideas/changes. 
 

but you’re absolutely right. Being informed is not a prerequisite for having an opinion. 

6 hours ago, ClaytoAli said:

....I’m similar to you in experience with the popo 👮‍♂️, just mine were on duty and were very nice people (if what I say every gets out).

I have no complaints about the officers. They did their job. 
 

Even if they were wrong, made mistakes, and I ultimately had everything (of importance) dropped. 
 

I think I was treated reasonably and they did what should be expected of them 

 

Two officers I know, one family, that know the original officer involved and the situation thoroughly were both surprised I wasn’t shot. So I got no complaints 🤷‍♂️ 

Edited by tshile
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@tshile none of what you said above excuses the cop's behavior in that video or explains why they weren't arrested for committing a felony. if the rule is "police unions" wont allow cops to get arrested for committing crimes (as you stated initially), then that's an obvious issue that needs to be changed

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I believe I mentioned multiple times it doesn’t excuse the behavior. 
 

I believe I said the point was to provide a possible explanation for why he hasn’t been arrested yet. 

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9 minutes ago, tshile said:

I believe I mentioned multiple times it doesn’t excuse the behavior. 
 

I believe I said the point was to provide a possible explanation for why he hasn’t been arrested yet. 

fair enough. my bad for misunderstanding

Edited by mammajamma
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12 hours ago, tshile said:

Just imagine how you’d feel if a family of 5 was killed because they were hit by a drunk driver at 10pm on their way to the beach, and a sheriffs deputy saw and identified the driver as drunk 20 minutes earlier, but decided “I’m off duty, I’m going home”


it just isn’t that cut and dry. In some regards/areas they’re never “off duty”. 
 

many of them carry their service weapon 24/7 solely because they realize being off duty doesn’t mean they can just sit by passively when something egregious is going on right in front of them. 
 

Ps - I absolutely had a run in with an off duty officer, out of his official jurisdiction 
 

and him being off duty didn’t really prevent how that went down. And no, no one along the way ever stopped and questioned anything about the issue because the person that initiated contact with me was off duty. It doesn’t work that way. At least not everywhere. 

That cop could just dial 911 to send on duty cops to stop the drunk driver, just like any normal person would do, but I'd think if a cop called it in they would take it even more serious.

 

I'd argue an unmarked cop car trying to pull over a drunk driver would make that situation way more dangerous than the off duty unmarked cop not doing anything.

Edited by purbeast
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12 hours ago, tshile said:

Just imagine how you’d feel if a family of 5 was killed because they were hit by a drunk driver at 10pm on their way to the beach, and a sheriffs deputy saw and identified the driver as drunk 20 minutes earlier, but decided “I’m off duty, I’m going home”


it just isn’t that cut and dry. In some regards/areas they’re never “off duty”.

What about the scenario when some off duty cop gives chase to a drunk driver and causes an accident resulting in death? Just call the on duty police. If someone is drunk and some random vehicle is trying to pull them over that's a disaster waiting to happen. Unless you're in a police car it seems like you'd be causing more trouble than anything.

Edited by Cooked Crack
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1 hour ago, Cooked Crack said:

What about the scenario when some off duty cop gives chase to a drunk driver and causes an accident resulting in death? Just call the on duty police. If someone is drunk and some random vehicle is trying to pull them over that's a disaster waiting to happen. Unless you're in a police car it seems like you'd be causing more trouble than anything.

I’m pretty sure they have to notify them. 
 

also I imagine the drunk driver scenario applies when they’re in a car with lights…. Idk how you pull someone over w/o lights. So it’s probably more on the way to/from work

 

 

i guess the better one would be seeing someone getting beaten up or something

 

something more immediate that doesn’t require a vehicle with lights 🤷‍♂️ 

1 hour ago, purbeast said:

That cop could just dial 911 to send on duty cops to stop the drunk driver, just like any normal person would do, but I'd think if a cop called it in they would take it even more serious.

 

I'd argue an unmarked cop car trying to pull over a drunk driver would make that situation way more dangerous than the off duty unmarked cop not doing anything.

Yeah. I se what you guys are saying about that example. It kind of requires a car

 

 

btw have you ever called 911 to report a drunk driver?

 

I have. It was a waste of time. And that person tried to kill multiple people that night. 
 

i was shocked. 

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I think the point here is off-duty officers should probably exercise some kind of general (good) judgement as to when the situation warrants them "springing into action."  Yes, if immediate danger is in the clear view and them intervening could be the difference between a pedestrians life or death or at least harm? Sure, get involved and do your thing.  However what I think people are hoping to guard against is the badge/gun being used as a tool to just go after people that annoy, frustrate, or make the off-duty copy angry for whatever reason.  I am not sure what the situation was with the black audi car, but it better have justified chasing them down, bottling them in, drawing a firearm and then actually shooting into the car when as far as we can tell the off-duty officer was in no immediate danger. 

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Supreme Court Revives Excessive Use of Force Case Involving Man Who Died in Custody; Conservative Trio of Justices Dissent

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has reversed and remanded an Eighth Circuit decision dismissing a family’s complaint about police use of excessive force, remanding the case to the lower court—and sparking yet another sharply–worded dissent from Justice Samuel Alito.

 

In Lombardo v. City of St. Louis, the parents of a 27-year-old who died in police custody asked the justices to revive a civil rights lawsuit. Parents Jody Lombardo and Bryan Gilbert argued that police used excessive force when six officers kept their late son, Nicholas Gilbert, restrained in the prone position, after he already had been handcuffed and placed in leg irons.

 

“The Court’s 6-3 opinion is a huge victory not only for our clients, but for police-reform advocates across the country and for the rule of law,” attorney Jonathan Taylor, who represents Lombardo and Gilbert, told Law&Crime in a statement. “As George Floyd‘s death made painfully clear, forcible prone restraint is a highly dangerous police tactic that has killed hundreds of people in the last decade or two and that serves no legitimate purpose. Today’s opinion is an important step toward reining in its use.”

 

The victory for Taylor’s clients could still prove short-lived: The high court explicitly declined ruling on whether police used excessive force, but most of the court urged a fuller consideration of factors investigating that question.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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Sheffield Lake police chief retires following racial incident captured on camera, city says

 

Sheffield Lake's police chief, Anthony Campo, has retired from the department following a racial incident that was captured on camera inside the precinct's booking room, according to the city.

 

The incident happened on June 25, according to a time stamp on the video.

 

Footage of the incident shows Campo place a yellow police rain coat face down on a desk with the hood prominently visible. The word "POLICE" is emblazoned on the rain coat. Campo then places a white folded piece of paper on the jacket with what appears to be three words printed on it, and then places it over the top of the word police.

 

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The Sheffield Lake law director told News 5 that "from my understanding it was related to the KKK."

 

The video then shows Campo walk out of the room and a Black officer comes in and Campo points out the coat and paper to him. After Campo walks out of the room, the officer picks up the paper and the rain coat. Other officers come into the room and have a discussion.

 

The video has no sound so its unclear what was said. You can watch the video in the player below:

 

Click on the link for the full article and video

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Off-duty Tennessee officer knocked unconscious after racist remarks

 

An internal investigation is underway after an off-duty Knoxville police officer was knocked unconscious for allegedly making racist remarks to another attendee at a wedding reception.

 

Officers responding to reports of the assault around 9 p.m. on June 26 found emergency personnel treating an unconscious person in the parking lot. Investigators say 22-year-old Tanner Holt, an off-duty Knoxville Police officer, was knocked unconscious after reportedly telling a Black man that he, “didn’t know they let Black people in the reception hall.”

 

An incident report alleges Holt, a white man, also told the man that he (Holt) was part of the Black community. An incident report states that Holt continued to make racial remarks despite the man telling him several times to stop talking about race.

 

Four witnesses corroborated accounts of the incident, though one admitted they did not hear what was being said. All witnesses stated that Holt was very intoxicated when the incident occurred, according to the report.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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