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Welcome to the Redskins Chase Young DE Ohio State


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Of all the players we had, including the Bosa brothers [the Chargers' Joey and the 49ers' Nick], as far as size and speed, Chase might be the most talented of all of them," former Ohio State coach Urban Meyer said, "which means he's probably one of the most talented players to come out of college in the last decade. All the intangibles are there, also the tangibles."

 

...The first sign Young was different came during his first season of football. At age 6, he memorized all 21 plays in a week. He'd get upset when others didn't match his preparation and forgot the plays. He would work out, doing push-ups and agility drills without any urging.

 

"He worked hard from an early age," his mother, Carla, said. "We never had to tell him to work out or exercise. We almost had to threaten him to sit down."

 

Carla said she and her husband, Greg, also hammered home a message. They would watch a great player in any sport and deliver a mini-sermon about what that player had to do to become that good.

"We always talked about being great," Carla said. "It was him being taught how you've got to sacrifice and put in the work, because anything easy is just average. To become great you have to make big sacrifices and work really hard -- much above average."

 

At age 7, Chase was cutting the grass and ironing his own clothes. He had regular household chores. And, in what probably makes him an anomaly, he did not own a cell phone until high school or have a TV in his room.

 

And Young's parents, mindful of former NFL running back and Heisman Trophy winner Herschel Walker's regimen of push-ups only, didn't want Young lifting weights until high school; he didn't work with a trainer until he was nearly in college.

 

...After committing to Ohio State, Young wore out Johnson's cell phone.

"He wanted to know everything," Johnson said.

By the end of his three years at Ohio State, Young asked Johnson to put together a folder of NFL pass-rushers -- Khalil Mack, Miller, Julius Peppers and the Bosas.

"I'd do a lot of watching of old guys," Young said.

Young and the Bosas were taught the same techniques, so Young wanted to see how Joey Bosa executed with the same moves in the NFL.

"You don't have to push the great players," Johnson said of Young. "They want it and want it as much as possible. Every Thursday, 'Coach, can we watch film after practice?' He'll text, 'Can we watch tape?'"

They would focus, for example, on Mack's bend off the corner. And they critiqued Young's film as well.

"A lot of times we'd go frame by frame with Chase, slow the video down; look at his techniques and flaws," Johnson said. "He learned so much by slowing the film down."

"If you want it bad enough you should be motivated to do it yourself and he was," Carla said.

 

Young said film work reduced his nervousness before games; it also allowed him to know some plays before the ball was snapped.

"I kept doing it and my game blossomed, so it would be dumb to stop," he said.

He is doing the same in the NFL, chatting up veterans like Kerrigan for tips.

"I've been around Chase a lot in these first couple weeks," Kerrigan said. "He's a guy who wants this information. He wants to know how he can be great, so I want to impart as much as I can on him and help him accomplish all he can accomplish because ... the sky's the limit for that guy."

Said Washington linebacker Kevin Pierre-Louis: "I've been in the league going on seven years now ... so I've seen a lot of first rounders. I've seen a lot of highly touted people coming in and he has a really good head on his shoulders, and you can't really ask for more from a guy like that who has the physical capabilities."

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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19 hours ago, Skinsinparadise said:

And my sunshine here is i think Kyle Smith is potentially that dude.  I think McLaurin might end up a superstar and I think Chase is almost a given to be a super star.

 

So bringing this back on point, I think Chase is going to break the mold.  Superstar.  And that's somewhat unfamiliar terrain for us Redskins fans and it should be fun to watch.  We deserve watching some elite talent for a change.    


I think McLaurin will be a star. But, a superstar? To me that’s a top 2 or 3 WR in the NFL and there is just so much talent at the position in this league. McLaurin has the requisite physical talents and the work ethic, toughness and maturity, so maybe he’ll get there.

 

We need Chase to be a superstar. Someone that changes the face of the whole defense. Also, I hope Montez Sweat is as good as he’s looked in camp and it’s not just the quality of the tackles he’s facing. It would be so huge for us to have two 12 plus sack guys on the outside. 
 

Also, it looked like Chase was moving pretty well in his individual work. I don’t want them to rush him, but Id feel a lot better if he were out there soon,  fully participating. 

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22 hours ago, Anselmheifer said:


I think McLaurin will be a star. But, a superstar? To me that’s a top 2 or 3 WR in the NFL and there is just so much talent at the position in this league. McLaurin has the requisite physical talents and the work ethic, toughness and maturity, so maybe he’ll get there.

 

We need Chase to be a superstar. Someone that changes the face of the whole defense. Also, I hope Montez Sweat is as good as he’s looked in camp and it’s not just the quality of the tackles he’s facing. It would be so huge for us to have two 12 plus sack guys on the outside. 
 

Also, it looked like Chase was moving pretty well in his individual work. I don’t want them to rush him, but Id feel a lot better if he were out there soon,  fully participating. 

 

To me a super star doesn't have to mean top 3.  To me it means great player.  If a position in talent in the league is loaded IMO it doesn't make it for example tougher to reach super star status, it just means the spot is loaded, that's all.  I don't know if McLaurin reaches that status or not but I think he has a chance, he has all the tools IMO.

 

Chase to me is almost a lock.  Just like the article i posted states, he has the tangibles and intangibles.

 

It's tough to always know in advance about a player's makeup.  But it seems like a common thread as to reach greatness is that the dude has off the charts work ethic and mindset.

 

I've defended some of the players I've liked in the draft in the past because I've felt attached to them so I just presumed they have the intangibles, too.  See Josh Doctson.  In retrospect, I was wrong.  We don't know really about these players as dudes except some of them may have loud critics or they get loud praise on that front.  McLaurin got lots of praise on that front before the draft.  So did Chase.   And conversely some players have been questioned on that front. 

 

I recall Cooley taking some heat on a thread years back (including from me) when he said asking around he sensed that Doctson didn't love football.   He was right.  You can see it in the way he played.  I've tried to be more attuned to that now.  And yeah Chase to me screams superstar on all fronts. 

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8 hours ago, Skinsinparadise said:

 

To me a super star doesn't have to mean top 3. 

 

I am in total agreement. Does anyone here believe there are only 3 superstar QBs in the league? Of course not.

 

If the talent is there, its there. Its that simple. Some guys just have the ability to make is brain, and those guys stand apart. (Zombie Pun)

 

The inverse is true as well. If one guy is super dominant, they can shrink the elite pool at the position. The Tres Way special

 

 

 

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That's the PFF write up.  I'll miss Cooley's takes on players, he wasn't always right but he was eerily spot on often.  TJ Watt who Cooley loved (I liked him before the draft too but not to the extent that Cooley did), ranked #5 here.    Cooley was also big on Allen Robinson over Paul Richardson in FA, he was right on that too among other things.   As for Chase, I recall Cooley in a podcast during the college season last year said Chase is the most impactful player right now in football aside from Lamar Jackson. 

 

https://www.pff.com/news/nfl-rankings-the-nfls-top-25-edge-defenders-ahead-of-the-2020-nfl-season

17. CHASE YOUNG, WASHINGTON FOOTBALL TEAM

It might seem like madness to rank a rookie this high before he has taken an NFL snap — we have all seen highly touted rookies amount to nothing at the next level — but it speaks to just how dominant Young was in college and how confident we are in his transition. PFF College grading has done an excellent job highlighting elite pass-rushers from the college ranks, and the two dominant edge rushers at Ohio State who preceded Young — the Bosa brothers — both hit the ground running in the NFL. Young produced the highest pass-rush grade we have ever seen in college (95.4) and the best pass-rush win rate (22.3%). He should be a force right out of the gate.

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Keim, making the point that I likewise agree on, motivation comes from within.  You can temporarily be motivated by external forces or maybe constantly motivated by that.  But I'd put my money on the players who are motivated to be great regardless of context.  And Chase to me comes off like that kind of dude just as much as McLaurin. 

 

 

 

 

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Eh, the correct answer is it's always a dynamic mixture of both external and internal, and motivating and demotivating factors. Long-term steady state Internal motivation takes time to develop and it's quality depends on the flavor of internal motivation chosen and invested in and the inter-connected value systems it draws it's energy from. Terry McLaurin is an example of someone who shows long-term practice and development of the "something bigger than yourself" flavor of internal motivation he got from his parents and Chase Young is an example of a "chasing greatness" flavor of internal motivation paired with an understanding that work leads to that greatness ever since his parents showed him the true grind of necessary for success as a kid.

 

A lot of kids don't have the benefit of external inputs and modeling to form the base needed for long-term steady state internal motivation and have to learn and build up those characteristics within themselves. Geron Christian seems to be lacking in the development of the extreme levels of internal motivation that Chase and Terry show, but the external motivation of a closer proximity to a "shot at greatness" is pushing him to develop. Hopefully, that external motivation can get him strong enough to take the job and succeed, so the positive feedback of success begins to fuel the internal side of that "shot at greatness" based flavor of motivation.

 

I hate when humans get into a back and forth on one pole position versus another, when the correct answer is always a best of both worlds mixture of the two poles that is relative to the context of the moment.

Edited by Fresh8686
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6 hours ago, Fresh8686 said:

 

I hate when humans get into a back and forth on one pole position versus another, when the correct answer is always a best of both worlds mixture of the two poles that is relative to the context of the moment.

 

I don't think Keim was arguing against external motivation.  He was saying the great ones tend to be self motivators.  I know from Keim's podcasts, he's not an all or nothing type of dude. 

 

I think what Keim was trying to say is that typically great players are self motivators.  I don't think he's going out on a limb on that.  I've read plenty of books from coaches including Walsh, Arians, Parcells, Belichick and they all somewhat converge on that point.   Gibbs has said he weighs a lot whether players from the get go when they arrive work hard or not and he felt that way especially for rookies.   Conversely all of those coaches felt the need to add their own motivation tactics as well.

 

I almost went into psychology, took grad classes in social cognition but switched gears midstream in my grad studies albeit I still use those materials in my work a lot.  I love reading sports psychology books.   It doesn't make me an expert of course but heck it's a message board so I'll share my dime store take on this anyway. 😀

 

 From what I've read in the field, at least among my readings, the sports psychologists who work with teams often focus quite a bit on how to make players self motivators where they aren't so dependant on external forces.  As for external forces -- a pep talk, fear about losing a job, it can work of course as a motivator.  But when those external variables change, sometimes so goes the motivation or the intensity of it, too.  The best athletes are often consistent.   And consistency often reflects consistent work habits.  And often consistent work habits come from really good internal motivations. 

 

And of course there are no absolutes.  Picking players in the draft is about playing the odds.  So if you pick a dude like Terry Mclaurin who seems to have great work habits and is a self motivator the odds are better everything being equal that they will succeed versus a dude that you are hoping the light switches on.  Not saying you are saying otherwise.  Just saying I get Keim's point that the odds are better with the self motivators everything being equal.  And Terry succeeded last season in spite of the bad environment -- he believes some of that had to do with his makeup. 

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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@Skinsinparadise

 

I feel you and don’t disagree with anything you said. My comment was more about reacting to/moving the conversation out of possible binary roads and being able to speak about the entire system of which both internal and external motivation play a part in a bi-directional feedback loop that creates interconnected layers of nature and nurture internalizations over time with relative levels of effectiveness. 

 

Internal motivation that is an identity level internalization, as in a part of who you are and interconnected with a well practiced value system will near always be the most sustainable and consistent foundation. But even that is based on your level of individuation and support network when trying times depress the reactivity and combustion that is what inherently gives motivation its energetic “lift”. 

 

Thats also how certain kinds of depression work by the way. It hustles people to internalize depression with a hit of comfort, kind of like people dealing with long term cold exposure wanting to fall asleep in the snow. And then that internalization numbs the reactivity of certain internal systems to stimulus which causes both pain/stress and saps the motivation to easily do anything about it. 

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16 hours ago, Skinsinparadise said:

That's the PFF write up.  I'll miss Cooley's takes on players, he wasn't always right but he was eerily spot on often.  TJ Watt who Cooley loved (I liked him before the draft too but not to the extent that Cooley did), ranked #5 here.    Cooley was also big on Allen Robinson over Paul Richardson in FA, he was right on that too among other things.   As for Chase, I recall Cooley in a podcast during the college season last year said Chase is the most impactful player right now in football aside from Lamar Jackson. 

 

https://www.pff.com/news/nfl-rankings-the-nfls-top-25-edge-defenders-ahead-of-the-2020-nfl-season

17. CHASE YOUNG, WASHINGTON FOOTBALL TEAM

It might seem like madness to rank a rookie this high before he has taken an NFL snap — we have all seen highly touted rookies amount to nothing at the next level — but it speaks to just how dominant Young was in college and how confident we are in his transition. PFF College grading has done an excellent job highlighting elite pass-rushers from the college ranks, and the two dominant edge rushers at Ohio State who preceded Young — the Bosa brothers — both hit the ground running in the NFL. Young produced the highest pass-rush grade we have ever seen in college (95.4) and the best pass-rush win rate (22.3%). He should be a force right out of the gate.


Was there any biped that thought Richardson was better than Robinson?

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6 hours ago, volsmet said:


Was there any biped that thought Richardson was better than Robinson?

 

Nope but he was making the case it's not even close and Robinson was a stud.  At that point Robinson wasn't coming off a year where he didn't look like a stud so I don't recall anyone on the FA thread pounding the table like he should be a slam dunk FA target though some of us did like him.  Cooley gushed so much about Robinson that Robinson himself thanked him for it on twitter. 

 

But yeah Cooley has been really good at calling FA busts that this team has signed in advance.  Nailed a bunch of players in the draft.  He loved by the way Drew Lock in that draft.   I told you on the draft thread one time, his views mirrors yours quite a bit on college players. 

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8 hours ago, Fresh8686 said:

@Skinsinparadise

 

Thats also how certain kinds of depression work by the way. It hustles people to internalize depression with a hit of comfort, kind of like people dealing with long term cold exposure wanting to fall asleep in the snow. And then that internalization numbs the reactivity of certain internal systems to stimulus which causes both pain/stress and saps the motivation to easily do anything about it. 

 

I agree generally with some slight exceptions.  My post isn't directed at you but i am not parroting off Keim's point about dudes who are driven and why they are the much better bets everything being equal.  

 

Depression I agree comes in many forms.   I worked in homes with people suffering from manic depression which wasn't always a fun ride -- that's obviously the most common biological form of it aside from clinical depression.

 

The college I came from was big on social cognition as to the focus of their psychology department including when it came to behavior patterns like depression.   And the gist of the theory stems from how an individual goes about processing information on a day to day basis can color their personality and behavior.  How do you internalize information.  Some people are just wired personality wise or learn to wire themselves (via real mentors or mentors from TV, reading-self help, etc) to even parlay negative feedback into fuel (if you listen for example to Adrian Peterson he lights up talking about how people trashing him, and how it drove him).  And some can't handle it. 

 

Having a good social network makes anything in life easier, I agree.  But it's also not the be all and end all and you can create your own positive reinforcement or model even if they aren't in your backyard.  You can also have a weak social support structure or even mostly a negative one -- yet cling to an outlier who you find supportive or maybe a book or two or a hero on TV of whatever moves someone.  Depends somewhat how you are wired.  Some of it is of course can be flat out inherent personality.

 

Going back to the Geron Christian example.  He was lucky he wasn't cut and or was replaced. You don't always have the luxury of waiting for it to click at some point.   Let's say it works out for him here.  If so it demanded some luck because they could have given up on him and if part of his problem according to some was his upper body strength (until this season) then another team might not have taken him on either.  It's fortunate that supposedly the light got switched on in year 3.    But sometimes your time runs out when you are waiting for fuel to push yourself to the next step. 

 

Guys like Brady or Adrian Peterson or many great players seem to be fueled (at least according to them) about them wanting it bad and driving themselves to it without that drive waxing and waning that much.   And again there are exceptions to everything.  I am sure there are some great players who might not be that driven but their talent carries them through or some dudes have the light turned on and then remain self-motivators throughout their career.  But as a betting guy, I'd put my money on the players who are consistently driven and don't need something to snap to get them going. 

 

 Brady talked about working like a dog when drafted by the Patriots even though the idea was he'd have no shot at starting but he worked himself into being noticed.  Christian by his own admission took the opposite route, he didn't think he had a shot so he didn't work that hard at it.  it's cool but I'd bet on dudes with Brady's psyche everything being equal. 

 

Bringing this back to one of the points i made earlier on this thread.  I do think if we drafted a dude like Jordy Nelson instead of Devin Thomas, he would have succeeded here.  It didn't take long to learn Thomas was a bit of a knucklehead and among other things came to his first camp out of shape.  Terry McLaurin succeeded here just like I think Nelson would have (another dude was big talent and high intangibles) even though it was a crap show.  It's why I think Jamal Adams was a still a stud safety also playing for a crap show team.    That is, a really talented player with major drive to be great is likely to succeed almost anywhere because they wire themselves for success and they aren't as driven by externals.   

 

Bringing this home, Chase Young to me screams will be a great player because he seems to have wanted to be great for a long time.  He visualized being a great player and according to him he continues to do so.  Meditates.  Is a healthy freak as for eating habits.  On and on.  He is willing to do anything to give him that edge.   You add that to his mega talent and I think the result is super stardom.  Will see. 

 

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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7 hours ago, TheShredder said:

They need to shut him down from possibly tearing more of that hip flexor or he won't ever be 100% this year. 


Im not real knowledgeable on hip flexor.  Ive heard about them.  But they already worked him back into practice slowly, right?

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2 hours ago, Vanguard said:


Im not real knowledgeable on hip flexor.  Ive heard about them.  But they already worked him back into practice slowly, right?

It's very much an interior core related muscle.  Hard to surgically repair, not like a typical sports hernia.  They would have done an MRI for sure.  Could be caused by over training.  Even slight tears take 2-4 weeks to heal.  Why risk it?  49'ers shut down Bosa for similar issues. 

 

hip-flexors-1024x630.png.71f26f561f981ed04579f81457a145d6.png

Edited by TheShredder
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@Skinsinparadise

 

No doubt and I agree that those players would have had a better chance here based upon their internal make-up. For the record I actually don't think Geron Christian will succeed to the point of ever being great and I'm just hoping for Donald Penn level production or better, because at this time he seems to lack the requisite level of mental and emotional intensity despite his physical gifts.

 

Psychology was my major in college as well and I've spent the last ten years building a movement based model of the internal systems/structures behind consciousness that describes and explains why people are "wired" certain ways and how that can change or not and how things actually internalize within people and the chemistries that go into effect based on the type of internalization, it's depth, and it's level of system-wide inter-connectivity, which then has a determinant effect on our personality, beliefs, and capabilities. It's a system I draw upon in my player evaluations for the draft thread and use to self-heal nerve and muscle damage in my own body and even have talked a little about on Michael Gervais' page who is the Seahawks Sports Psychologist.

 

Anyways, the only minor quibble I have with what you wrote above is that you seem to be selling support network's a little short or maybe not considering how brutal life can be without shelter, especially as a kid? Also, support networks are more than just social networks and include the things you mentioned, plus more basic levels of shelter, nurturing, and exposure to cognitive nuance/depth, plus the quality of the very environment one is in at a given time.

 

I think we are on the same page, but I want to make sure we are threading the needle in that we agree we need people/outside stimulus to be and become in a healthy way, while also needing to develop ourselves and individuate through self-derived means and consistent action. Even guys like Tom Brady or other self-driven people need others and the right kind of environment to succeed. They especially need others, because that type of intensity needs to have other people around to counter-balance it so it doesn't lead in unhealthy directions. Humans are dynamic creatures, but the range for humanity is so large, that we need a diversity of others to counter-balance and reflect to us the unique feedback we need to progress properly so we all fit together in harmony like shiplap panels. And when we don't get accurate or healthy feedback it ****s us up as people and slows us down, especially as kids, because then we got to spend all this time deprogramming ****ty internalizations and replacing them with healthy ones.

 

Anyways, thanks for the cool convo man and sorry for the delayed response.

 

 

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