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Presidential Election 2024: 11/5/24- Democracy Dies or Survives


88Comrade2000

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14 minutes ago, Califan007 The Constipated said:

 

What has he skated on?...He still has at least four indictments/trials, almost 100 charges, and hasn't won a case yet.

The guy is still walking the streets. I think that justifies my statement.

 

But I’m not getting into a battle of semantics with you. I would rather pour glass broken glass into my eyeballs. 😆

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3 minutes ago, AlvinWaltonIsMyBoy said:

The guy is still walking the streets. I think that justifies my statement.

 

But I’m not getting into a battle of semantics with you. I would rather pour glass broken glass into my eyeballs. 😆

 

You redefined "skating" to fit your cynicism, and then gave yourself an out by claiming it's "semantics" lol...OK, then.

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If nothing else, this Colorado Supreme Court ruling etches into history the treachery of Donald Trump. The ruling reads like a "no duh" summary of everything we witnessed.  He incited and engaged in an insurrection.  We watched, horrified as it unfolded.  For the first time in America's history, we did not have a peaceful transfer of power.

 

This ruling cuts through all the noise from the willfully ignorant and/or morally repugnant in the MAGA cult and the cowardly political apologists and enablers who are trying to rewrite recent history. 

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7 minutes ago, Califan007 The Constipated said:

 

You redefined "skating" to fit your cynicism, and then gave yourself an out by claiming it's "semantics" lol...OK, then.


the guys nickname is literally “Teflon don” and you’re in here grilling people over saying he skates on things cause someone redefined the term 

 

😆 

Just now, Dan T. said:

If nothing else, this Colorado Supreme Court ruling etches into history the treachery of Donald Trump. The ruling reads like a "no duh" summary of everything we witnessed.  He incited and engaged in an insurrection.  We watched, horrified as it unfolded.  For the first time in America's history, we did not have a peaceful transfer of power.

 

This ruling cuts through all the noise from the willfully ignorant and/or morally repugnant in the MAGA cult and the cowardly political apologists and enablers who are trying to rewrite recent history. 


this and, I don’t know I guess I’m lame, but I still respect the processes. 
 

 

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17 minutes ago, The Evil Genius said:

What's this senile queef talking about now?

 

Senile queef lol 😂

 

 

12 minutes ago, tshile said:


the guys nickname is literally “Teflon don” and you’re in here grilling people over saying he skates on things cause someone redefined the term 

 

😆

 

 

Did you pay attention to how he defined "skating"?...If you did, you'd better understand my response.

Edited by Califan007 The Constipated
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Quickly read through the opinion and dissents.  It was a 4-3 opinion... but the dissenters didn't all line up. 

 

The opinion basically said, "It is so obvious that the President is an Officer of the United States, there's no questioning it."  And reversed the District Court. 

 

Two of the dissents said Trump hasn't been given "due process", because there has not been a conviction and the state of Colorado has not instituted a process to do a 13th amendment review of the candidates.  The third dissent avoided a complaint about due process and says that Colorado law hasn't instituted a process to adjudicate a 13th amendment review.  Just lots of legal jargon about whether 13A is "self-executing".  

 

So because Colorado law doesn't specify a removal process, Trump can stay on the ballot?  This is an insane case.  I don't even know how this is appealable to the Supreme Court.  Federal law doesn't control it, so the only thing they could say is "the President is not an officer of the United States", but then you would upend provisions like impeachment.  

 

So, to me this is it. SCOTUS stays out of this.  Or they uphold the ruling.  To not uphold the ruling would threaten Federalism or the Constitution itself.  States don't have rights to run their elections (Federalism). Or the thirteenth amendment is meaningless (Constitutuon).  

 

I am going to be so pissed if we get this "non-precedential opinion" which handwaves over Colorado and says "You can't enforce the 13th amendmemt". 

 

Yet, I think out of, decline to hear, uphold, or overturn, we are likely to get overturn... because they are not impartial.  They are political.  

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17 minutes ago, Fergasun said:

 

So because Colorado law doesn't specify a removal process, Trump can stay on the ballot?  This is an insane case.  I don't even know how this is appealable to the Supreme Court.  Federal law doesn't control it, so the only thing they could say is "the President is not an officer of the United States", but then you would upend provisions like impeachment.  


the idea that there is not process to adjudicate the 13th, and that being an issue, is not insane. I’m not saying it’s right or anyone has to agree with it, but it’s a legitimate issue to take. 
 

the idea there needs to be a higher standard of proof is also not insane. 
 

and the Supreme Court doesn’t only rule on federal matters so the fact that it’s a state working in state elections isn’t a reason they can’t look at it. The question is whether tge states action is inline with the constitution and that’s literally what they’re for. 
 

none of that is meant to endorse the dissent. I personally think he obviously is what the amendment is about and should not be allowed on the ballot. He did it on live tv it’s not really refutable. 

Edited by tshile
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Lol... 14A section three... yeah... you guys got me.... I was skimming through "section 3" as 13 maybe?

...

All he had to do is not engage in insurrection.  

 

They are all acting like "this is just trying to keep political enemies off the ballot." 

 

And this is a guy "running against him?".  Everyone should be like, "our guy just got disqualified in one state.  Let's stop acting like he's no criminal. He's a criminal!!"

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I took all my money out of the stock market because DJT said "we're going to see a crash the likes of which we've never seen."

 

But then, perhaps in the same speech, he says he saw someone say that the market is doing so well because "they" think Trump is getting reelected.

 

The guy just floods the zone with contradictory bull****. Man, it's depressing enough that we all are subjected to following a ****ty football team......

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Full text:

 

"The 14th Amendment's Reckoning: The Case of Donald Trump's Disqualification"

 

In the labyrinth of American constitutional law, the 14th Amendment emerges as a cornerstone, a beacon of civil liberties and a safeguard against tyranny. Section 3 of this amendment, often overshadowed by its more frequently cited counterparts, holds a key to understanding the architecture of American democracy. It reads as a stark reminder, a post-Civil War relic, intended to prevent those who betray the Union from holding office.

 

At its core, this provision is a testament to the fragility of democracy and the perpetual threat of its erosion from within. This clause, born out of the ashes of rebellion, serves as a bulwark against those who would, through insurrection or rebellion, seek to dismantle the democratic fabric of the nation. It embodies the collective resolve of a nation to preserve its democratic ethos, ensuring that the reins of power never fall into the hands of those who have attempted to subvert the constitutional order.

 

The #Colorado #SupremeCourt's ruling to disqualify Donald Trump from the ballot and from holding office under this seldom-invoked section of the 14th Amendment marks a watershed moment in American jurisprudence and political history. This decision does not merely interpret the law; it echoes the cries of accountability and justice that have reverberated through the halls of democracy since the harrowing events of the Capitol insurrection.

 

#Trump's role in inciting the insurrection represents more than just a breach of legal boundaries; it signifies a profound betrayal of the democratic principles upon which the United States was founded. His actions, and the subsequent insurrection, tore at the very fabric of the nation, threatening to unravel the threads of order, liberty, and justice that have been carefully woven over centuries.

 

In disqualifying Trump, the Colorado Supreme Court has not only upheld the letter of the law but also the spirit of democracy. This ruling serves as a stark reminder that #democracy, though resilient, is not invulnerable. It requires constant vigilance and an unwavering commitment to the principles of #justice and accountability. This ruling stands as a testament to the ongoing struggle to preserve democratic values in the face of adversity. It reminds us that the lessons of history must not be forgotten, that the specters of insurrection and tyranny continue to loom over our collective conscience.

 

The decision by the Colorado Supreme Court is not just about one man or one insurrection; it is about setting a precedent that those who seek to undermine democracy will be held accountable.

 

As we move forward, this moment in history will be scrutinized, debated, and analyzed. It will be seen as a pivotal point where the judiciary rose to protect the sanctity of democracy. This decision, steeped in the principles enshrined in the 14th Amendment, reaffirms the idea that democracy, though often tested, is ultimately defined by its ability to hold its leaders accountable, to stand firm against the tides of insurrection and to emerge stronger in its commitment to the ideals of liberty and justice for all.

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Actually it was 4 Republicans and 2 "unaffiliated voters", but still the point remains.

 

Heard one of the talking heads reiterate that they believe many Republicans would love to finally be rid of Trump as a political leader and are more than content with this ruling, and hope it remains in place after it goes to the SC (which is most definitely will). I buy that.

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