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Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired


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4 minutes ago, mcsluggo said:

me too... but that certainly adds up the costs.

 

perhaps have the social workers ride as partners in some percentage of (rotating) patrol cars?      

 

Right, there has to be some way to possibly have social workers, or the orgs they are part of subcontracted out for this type of thing.  I am not sure what percentage of 911 calls mention mental illness as part of the call.

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Rochester police chief to retire amid Daniel Prude death protests

 

Rochester, New York, Police Chief La'Ron Singletary has submitted paperwork to retire, days after saying he had no intention of stepping down amid protests over the death of Daniel Prude in police custody.

 

Mayor Lovely Warren said that the chief and his command staff submitted their retirement papers.


"As a man of integrity, I will not sit idly by while outside entities attempt to destroy my character," the chief said in a statement. "The events over the past week are an attempt to destroy my character and integrity."


Singletary said he was stepping down after serving the department and community for 20 years "with honor, pride, and the highest integrity." The mayor said Singletary will stay in his role through the end of the month.


News of the retirements came on the same day that Prude's sister filed suit in federal court against Singletary, 13 other officers and the city of Rochester, alleging in part a department cover-up of the death.

 

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53 minutes ago, mcsluggo said:

me too... but that certainly adds up the costs.

 

perhaps have the social workers ride as partners in some percentage of (rotating) patrol cars?      

I’ve said from the start that what defund advocates are describing sounds like a very expensive overhaul.  The idea that you just throw in some social workers into a system of emergency response will not be simple or cheap.  There’s no obvious way to distinguish who is dangerous and who isn’t.  What happens when some of them get stabbed or shot?  What happens when they form their own union?

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Acevedo said Thursday that Chavez had been incapacitated by multiple Taser cartridges, bean bags and three gunshots before the four officers fired -- after he was down -- a total of 21 shots in the final moments of a 15-minute encounter.

This dude was already shot three times already!

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Ex-cops charged in George Floyd death point fingers at each other during first joint court appearance

 

Attorneys for the four ex-cops charged in the killing of George Floyd want separate trials — apparently so they can turn on each other.

 

The four men called for the cases to be separate during a joint court appearance Friday in Minneapolis.

 

The lawyers say their clients are likely to offer “antagonistic” defenses and that evidence against one suspect could prevent another’s right to a fair trial. They’re also seeking sequestered and anonymous juries and have asked the trials to be moved away from Minneapolis, saying the ongoing publicity has made it impossible for the four men to defend themselves.

 

Friday’s hearing marked the first time that all four suspects appeared together since Floyd’s death on May 25. Derek Chauvin, the only defendant still in custody, had joined previous hearings via video conferencing but had not appeared in person.

 

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California cop allegedly burglarized home after responding to death of elderly man

 

A California sheriff's deputy has been arrested and placed on administrative leave for allegedly burglarizing a home after responding to the death of an elderly man.

 

Steve Hortz was a 12-year veteran of the Orange County Sheriff's Department prior to his arrest on Thursday, the police department said.

 

In late July, Hortz responded to a call in Yorba Linda regarding an elderly man who died from apparent natural causes.

 

On Wednesday, an attorney representing the family estate called the police department to report some items missing from the home and shared home surveillance video that depicted Hortz entering the property at least three times and "exiting with stolen property," according to a police statement.

 

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In the first instance on July 27, Hortz entered while in uniform. He returned on Aug. 10 and Aug. 16 while in civilian clothes and stole weapon safes, ceiling fans and other boxes with unknown contents, authorities said.

 

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The documents show how the police attempted to frame the narrative in the earliest hours, playing up Mr. Prude’s potential for danger and glossing over the tactics of the officers who pinned him, naked and hooded, to the ground before he stopped breathing.

In a police report on the confrontation, marking a box for “victim type,” an officer on the scene listed Mr. Prude — who the police believed had broken a store window that night — simply as an “individual.” But another officer circled the word in red pen and scribbled a note.

“Make him a suspect,” it read.

 

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If you have to produce an ID when asked, the general public should know that.  If this isn’t the case police should be held accountable when they use it to justify an arrest (beating).  There shouldn’t be any confusion, but for some reason it’s a constant theme that the general public and police seem to be working with different rule books.  

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On 9/9/2020 at 12:40 PM, Destino said:

I’ve said from the start that what defund advocates are describing sounds like a very expensive overhaul.  The idea that you just throw in some social workers into a system of emergency response will not be simple or cheap.  There’s no obvious way to distinguish who is dangerous and who isn’t.  What happens when some of them get stabbed or shot?  What happens when they form their own union?

This is just a part of the reason why the incredibly poorly worded, simplistic defund police campaign is just silly. Police unions are one of the biggest impediments to reform and ought to be target número uno so that the other myriad issues, including decreasing the police’s scope of operations can be realistically addressed. 

 

49 minutes ago, NoCalMike said:

In what kind of F-D scenario is not having an ID on you grounds for being detained, let alone arrested and beat/choked within an inch of your life?   That was just outrageous.  

Being black.

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24 minutes ago, Destino said:

If you have to produce an ID when asked, the general public should know that.  If this isn’t the case police should be held accountable when they use it to justify an arrest (beating).  There shouldn’t be any confusion, but for some reason it’s a constant theme that the general public and police seem to be working with different rule books.  

 

Cops don’t like it when you try to exercise your rights.  My understanding is that in most situations you are not required to provide ID.  But you just happen to “fit the description” of something so they can arrest you and run your prints.  

 

I, a somewhat well-off white male, found they didn’t appreciate it when I exercised my right to remain silent and speak to an attorney (I didn’t do anything wrong but could tell they were trying to bait me).  I got arrested and had to spend a couple grand on an attorney.  When I FINALLY got in front of a judge, he asked the prosecutor if he had ever been to law school.  But the cops knew they got to make my life difficult.  Imagine those that couldn’t afford a lawyer.......or happen to be black.

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Seems like "Show me your ID" is the method that gets the ball rolling.  Unless someone is being detained or suspected of wrong doing and the police clearly state that, then I am not sure why producing an ID on demand is required.  I am not saying it isn't the law because legally I have no idea, and I am sure it varies state to state, maybe even city to city?  However, if the police ask for ID, and you either refuse or honestly don't have ID on you, then I don't see why that automatically escalates the situation by default.  I remember being young and took off out of my house plenty of times with no wallet or ID and didn't think anything of it because I didn't need my ID for anything I was planning on doing at that time. 

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1 hour ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

 

Cops don’t like it when you try to exercise your rights.  

I learned that early in life.  It was just a minor inconvenience but the message got through.  
 

I got stopped in ocean city while I was in high school.  Bull**** stop asking if I’d been drinking.  I hadn’t, in fact I was just arriving and I was late.  Last of my friends to get there and I had my bag in the backseat.  As you can imagine I was eager to be on my way, but I was polite and answered all his questions and made it clear I was entirely sober.  Cop asked if he could search my car.  Why would a situation where I had done exactly nothing wrong, not even a ticket, turn into a search? So I said no.  He clearly didn’t like it, but said he was going to run my ID and be right back.  
 

He made me wait for three hours.

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Louisville agrees to pay Breonna Taylor's family $12 million and enact police reforms in historic settlement

 

The city of Louisville, Kentucky, has agreed to pay $12 million to the family of Breonna Taylor and institute sweeping police reforms in a historic settlement of the family's wrongful death lawsuit.

 

Mayor Greg Fischer, Taylor's family and their attorneys announced the settlement at a joint press conference on Tuesday. Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was killed in her home by police on March 13.


As part of the settlement, the city agreed to establish a housing credit program as an incentive for officers to live in the areas they serve; use social workers to provide support on certain police runs; and require commanders to review and approve search warrants before seeking judicial approval, among other changes.

 

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3 hours ago, dfitzo53 said:

And yet her killers are still walking free.

This is what I don't get. Proper training and better hiring practices would be more efficient and cheaper in the long run.

 

Also, any settlements should come directly out of the police budget. They also shouldn't have a budget for settlements if they do have that ( I don't know).

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3 hours ago, Simmsy said:

This is what I don't get. Proper training and better hiring practices would be more efficient and cheaper in the long run.

 

Also, any settlements should come directly out of the police budget. They also shouldn't have a budget for settlements if they do have that ( I don't know).


This is going back quite a bit but the dept I was with had insurance for such things.

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(CNN)A Salt Lake City police officer was charged Wednesday in connection with allegedly ordering a police dog to attack a Black man who was surrendering to police, on his knees with his hands in the air.
 

Nickolas Pearce has been placed on administrative leave since video of the incident became public last month. He is now facing an aggravated assault charge, a second-degree felony.

 

CNN could not reach Pearce for comment.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/17/us/utah-police-dog-attack-surrendering-suspect-trnd/index.html
 

I hate this for two reasons.

1- cops shouldn’t be doing this.  Obviously.  Using an attack dog on a guy who has surrendered is criminal.
2- the article also fills us in on why the police where there:

 

Quote

Police approached Ryans at the residence around 3:30 a.m. saying they were responding to an incident of domestic violence, according to Ryans' lawyers. Ryans' daughter made the 911 call to police, according to a recording of the call released by police.

"My dad is doing very bad things to our family," the daughter says.

"He's yelling and screaming," she says, as raised voices are heard in the background.

"Did he strike your mom?" the operator asks.

The daughter answers: "Yes."

No little girl should have to call the police on her dad because he’s once again shown up to beat her mom.  Despite a restraining order.  By setting the dog on him this cop made this scumbag a victim himself and possibly earns him some settlement cash.  Might even make his family think twice about calling them next time he shows up.
 

Hopefully, he still gets charged for the abuse and sent to prison for a nice long time.

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On 9/15/2020 at 8:37 PM, TheGreatBuzz said:

My understanding is that in most situations you are not required to provide ID

That is not my understanding at all. My understanding, in this state, is that if the police become involved in a situation they will ID everyone. There's lots of reasons but the easiest and most common one I've heard is looking for people with warrants, cause that's how they get a lot of people with warrants - randomly coming across them in situations and finding they have a warrant (which usually also brings an additional charge of falsely identifying yourself, because usually they try that first, because they know they have a warrant)

 

my understanding is that they are not allowed to just walk up to you and ask for ID. actually, and I know this from unfortunate situations though it was a long time ago, my understanding is (in this state) they're not even allowed to come up and 'bother' you about anything unless they have an official reason to. Unless you're stationary (like if you were sitting on the curb). Then they can come up and ask you anything they want, but you're not obligated to give any answers so long as they are not acting in an official capacity of checking something out. But they're not allowed to stop you (like if you're walking down the sidewalk), and then ask you questions, unless they have a valid reason in the first place. The lawyer that explained this to me may have been wrong, and things may have changed since then (this was 17 years ago.) but that was my understanding at the time.
 

also, I think we should at a minimum wait until we can see the whole video. What happened beforehand? I’m not saying it was justified, I’m saying it’s awfully interesting we never see what starts the situation. 
 

And in a general note, the “I can’t breath” is going to be treated like the “I only had 2 beers” response. I’m not saying it’s right. Just saying I’m pretty sure that’s how it’s being treated. 

On 9/15/2020 at 8:40 PM, NoCalMike said:

am not sure why producing an ID on demand is required

Because the first thing they want to know is who you are. And there’s reasons for that. 
 

I do not know where the line in an interaction is that police can require an ID. My understanding is that if you’re in a vehicle that’s been pulled over, they absolutely may demand everyone’s ID. 
 

now, from the people I know, they didn’t beat you for it. They just arrested you and took you to booking until they could find out who you are.  Detained might be the 'correct' term here.
 

they also did the same thing with people who try the “no speak English” card. It is amazing how some learn English very quickly when they realize they’re going to be hauled off to the jail for ID and that simply saying “no speak English” isn’t a free pass to get the police to leave you alone. (Mentioning it cause I think it fits with the ID issue)

 

of course I imagine this varies by state. 

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39 minutes ago, Destino said:

Hopefully, he still gets charged for the abuse and sent to prison for a nice long time.

 

I don't see how he would get out of violating a restraining order and an additional account of domestic violence (unless previous issues only resulted in a restraining order and no charges/convictions...)

 

They're separate issues. Unless the powers that be bend to political pressure for some absurd reason. Cash settlement from the police, fine whatever. Doesn't mean you get to violate a restraining order and beat someone and get away with it.

 

if this was a situation where he was pulled over for reckless driving and then this happened, I could see them dropping the charges as part of the negotiation over the cash settlement (not sure if that's even legal? they would probably do it just to save face anyways.) Not domestic violence. Especially if it includes violating a restraining order in place for previous issues of domestic violence...

 

(i otherwise absolutely agree with your post)

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