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Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired


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Pasco County Sheriff Chris Nocco took office in 2011 with a bold plan: to create a cutting-edge intelligence program that could stop crime before it happened.

 

What he actually built was a system to continuously monitor and harass Pasco County residents, a Tampa Bay Times investigation has found.

 

First the Sheriff’s Office generates lists of people it considers likely to break the law, based on arrest histories, unspecified intelligence and arbitrary decisions by police analysts.

 

Then it sends deputies to find and interrogate anyone whose name appears, often without probable cause, a search warrant or evidence of a specific crime.

 

They swarm homes in the middle of the night, waking families and embarrassing people in front of their neighbors. They write tickets for missing mailbox numbers and overgrown grass, saddling residents with court dates and fines. They come again and again, making arrests for any reason they can.

 

One former deputy described the directive like this: “Make their lives miserable until they move or sue.”

 

In just five years, Nocco’s signature program has ensnared almost 1,000 people.

 

At least one in 10 were younger than 18, the Times found.

 

Some of the young people were labeled targets despite having only one or two arrests.

 

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I have no issue with data driven police work so long as it shows results and doesn’t harass people to the point that it prevents them from building a normal law abiding life.  I imagine it’s hard to earn respect and hold down a job if cops are showing up handing out fines for trivial BS.  Who would want to rent or live next to a person with cops circling constantly?  No one.  
 

That program sounds like it’s built around the idea of harassing people until they move away, more than anything else.  That’s terrible.  Cops shouldn’t get to decide who to harass maliciously without recourse.  They’re job is to enforce the law not decide who should live where.  
 

That being said, the word “only” should not appear before “one or two arrests” regarding young people.  Forgetting to do homework is a small mistake.  Breaking into a location to steal expensive motorized bikes with your friends is a heist (this is one example described in the article).  Adults do real jail time for that.  There’s no “only” for crimes like that.  Once will destroy your life if a judge decides you’re adult enough.  

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Multiple stories just today of horrible, department-wide bull**** (the LA sheriffs forming a club where you have to kill people to join, and then the TB PD harassing people who aren't breaking the law). Funding needs to be reduced now.

 

 

also, wondering in that TB story, if people that are being harassed without breaking the law can take advantage of FL's crazy stand your ground law and defend themselves

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9 minutes ago, mammajamma said:

Multiple stories just today of horrible, department-wide bull**** (the LA sheriffs forming a club where you have to kill people to join, and then the TB PD harassing people who aren't breaking the law). Funding needs to be reduced now.

 

That LA stuff has been wild for a while.  They’re basically gangs, complete with tattoos, within the department.

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Tempe officer holds Black man at gunpoint while searching for white suspect

 

A Tempe police officer is under investigation after the department says he held a Black man at gunpoint while searching for a white suspect. 

 

According to a news release from the Tempe Police Department, Officer Ronald Kerzaya responded to the Hawthorn Suites hotel near Loop 101 and Southern Avenue on Aug. 29 for a report of a man with a gun. The manager of the hotel told Kerzaya the suspect was a white man wearing a black T-shirt and tan pants. The manager said the suspect left out of the west side of the building.

 

Kerzaya then went to the west side of the building to search for the suspect. That's when a Black employee wearing a light gray shirt and black pants was exiting the building and identified himself as an employee. Kerzaya then held the man at gunpoint "until he could confirm that he was an employee of the hotel," the press release states. 

 

Body worn camera footage released by the Tempe Police Department shows Kerzaya holding the man at gunpoint for three minutes while he confirmed with dispatch that the man was an employee at the hotel. Kerzaya is heard on the footage telling the Black employee, "I am responding to somebody with a firearm who matches your description." Though just two minutes earlier on the same footage, Kerzaya confirms with the hotel manager that the suspect with the gun was a white man.

 

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Bay Area police officer charged in fatal shooting of Black man under CA’s tougher deadly-force law

 

A White officer has been charged with felony manslaughter in the fatal shooting in April of a Black man in a Walmart store, a crime alleged under a newly strengthened California law that requires police to use deadly force only when needed to defend human life, the county prosecutor said.

 

San Leandro Police Officer Jason Fletcher, 49, was charged Wednesday with voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of Steven Taylor, 33, after the pair scuffled over a baseball bat inside the store in the Northern California city, according to officials and court documents.

 

The charge comes amid intense nationwide scrutiny of police conduct following the death and severe injury of a string of Black men while in custody. California lawmakers last year enacted one of the strictest police deadly force measures in the country after a Sacramento prosecutor declined to charge two officers who killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed Black man, in his grandmother’s backyard.

 

During the San Leandro confrontation, Taylor did not pose an immediate threat to police when Fletcher shot him to death, prosecutors determined, said Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley.

 

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Tennessee trooper is arrested and charged with assault after being caught on film ripping off the face mask of a protester who was filming a traffic stop

 

A Tennessee Highway Patrol trooper who was fired for allegedly ripping the face mask off a man filming a traffic stop has now been arrested and charged with assault.  

 

Harvey Briggs, 52, was arrested and charged with assault Thursday at about 9pm. He was released on a $1,000 bond at about 11.30pm that night, WKRN reported. 

 

Briggs' arrest comes nearly a month after he was caught on camera getting right up into the face of a protester and supposedly yanking off his face mask near the Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville, Tennessee. 

 

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21 hours ago, China said:

That's why funding needs to go away from police and put towards social services that are better equipped to handle situations like those.

I agree but I also think we should expect cops not to blast 13 year olds having mental breaks.  I don’t accept that this is something that requires a tremendous amount of training and study to figure out.  If you can’t get him to calm down, you back away and ask for help.  Decent people can figure out not to shoot the kid.  

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Call police for a woman who is changing clothes in an alley? A new program in Denver sends mental health professionals instead.

 

A concerned passerby dialed 911 to report a sobbing woman sitting alone on a curb in downtown Denver.

 

Instead of a police officer, dispatchers sent Carleigh Sailon, a seasoned mental health professional with a penchant for wearing Phish T-shirts, to see what was going on.

 

The woman, who was unhoused, was overwhelmed and scared. She’d ended up in an unfamiliar part of town. It was blazing hot and she didn’t know where to go. Sailon gave the woman a snack and some water and asked how she could help. Could she drive her somewhere? The woman was pleasantly surprised.

 

“She was like, ‘Who are you guys? And what is this?'” Sailon said, recounting the call.

 

This, Sailon explained, is Denver’s new Support Team Assistance Response program, which sends a mental health professional and a paramedic to some 911 calls instead of police.


Since its launch June 1, the STAR van has responded to more than 350 calls, replacing police in matters that don’t threaten public safety and are often connected to unmet mental or physical needs. The goal is to connect people who pose no danger with services and resources while freeing up police to respond to other calls. The team, which is not armed, has not called police for backup, Sailon said.

 

“We’re really trying to create true alternatives to us using police and jails,” said Vinnie Cervantes with Denver Alliance for Street Health Response, one of the organizations that helped start the program.

 

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14 hours ago, Destino said:

I agree but I also think we should expect cops not to blast 13 year olds having mental breaks.  I don’t accept that this is something that requires a tremendous amount of training and study to figure out.  If you can’t get him to calm down, you back away and ask for help.  Decent people can figure out not to shoot the kid.  

 

agreed.

 

but it highlights a basic fundamental problem: that some employees are better employees than others.  Full stop.   in every single profession.   but armed police (with the huge amount of power that is entrusted with them) that are bad employees have the potential to cause a helluva lot more problems than a piss-poor Blockbusters employee.       

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10 hours ago, China said:

Call police for a woman who is changing clothes in an alley? A new program in Denver sends mental health professionals instead.

 

A concerned passerby dialed 911 to report a sobbing woman sitting alone on a curb in downtown Denver.

 

Instead of a police officer, dispatchers sent Carleigh Sailon, a seasoned mental health professional with a penchant for wearing Phish T-shirts, to see what was going on.

 

The woman, who was unhoused, was overwhelmed and scared. She’d ended up in an unfamiliar part of town. It was blazing hot and she didn’t know where to go. Sailon gave the woman a snack and some water and asked how she could help. Could she drive her somewhere? The woman was pleasantly surprised.

 

“She was like, ‘Who are you guys? And what is this?'” Sailon said, recounting the call.

 

This, Sailon explained, is Denver’s new Support Team Assistance Response program, which sends a mental health professional and a paramedic to some 911 calls instead of police.


Since its launch June 1, the STAR van has responded to more than 350 calls, replacing police in matters that don’t threaten public safety and are often connected to unmet mental or physical needs. The goal is to connect people who pose no danger with services and resources while freeing up police to respond to other calls. The team, which is not armed, has not called police for backup, Sailon said.

 

“We’re really trying to create true alternatives to us using police and jails,” said Vinnie Cervantes with Denver Alliance for Street Health Response, one of the organizations that helped start the program.

 

Click on the link for the full article

 

 

i LOVE the idea of this... but i also recognize that there is a LOT of missing information between a scene and what is reported to a dispatcher --- and like police, it is not as if dispatchers are hired from the most elite hiring pools (some are going to be great, some...less so)

 

i admit to being a bit concerned what happens when an unarmed woman in a Phish shirt is sent alone into a scary/untenable situation

 

 

(which is not to say i don;t want to try this.... just to highlight there really ARE no easy answers here)

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1 hour ago, mcsluggo said:

i admit to being a bit concerned what happens when an unarmed woman in a Phish shirt is sent alone into a scary/untenable situation

 

 

(which is not to say i don;t want to try this.... just to highlight there really ARE no easy answers here)

 

If it was up to me, I would still send an officer or two with the social worker, as back up in case the situation escalated.  I wouldn't make it an either/or.

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Just now, NoCalMike said:

 

If it was up to me, I would still send an officer or two with the social worker, as back up in case the situation escalated.  I wouldn't make it an either/or.

me too... but that certainly adds up the costs.

 

perhaps have the social workers ride as partners in some percentage of (rotating) patrol cars?      

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