Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired


Recommended Posts

49 minutes ago, Llevron said:

Thats what I would think, no way do I know what the rules actually are so this is just my opinion. But I, personally, would fault them if what I described above was the case. I do get your point though. Violent guys, armed, with a hostage, fleeing to god knows where pose an obvious threat too. I just dont think unloading 19 guns in the middle of the street with civilians in the cross fire is in any way a good judgment call and I would fault them for that. 

 

Right. The video seems to suggest the UPS truck was toast, they weren't going to be able to flee.  At that point I thought what might happen was more cops continue to show up, maybe they create a perimeter and evacuate civilians from the area.   The situation was sticky, but it never seems like a particularly great idea to just start unloading your guns in the middle of an area where civilians are sitting idle.   

 

At the least they could use a situation like this to examine future policy to work on continued ways to limit "collateral damage"

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, NoCalMike said:

At the least they could use a situation like this to examine future policy to work on continued ways to limit "collateral damage"

 

Yea and thats what I mean by faulting them. Not saying the officers should be fired or even reprimanded. But if they are not trained for this stuff, then either they should be or there should be a plan of action to get them out of the way and get a swat team in place or something. 

 

Im not at all im saying the police are bad guys in this particular case.....right now. Of course im never going to discount the possibility. But they could have legit made the wrong decision thinking it was their only course of action and in that kind of situation I can understand it. But that would still make them wrong imo. 

12 minutes ago, StillUnknown said:

 

Because they are the real victims here

 

**** is comical to me

 

Its not even worth it man

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.local10.com/news/local/2019/12/06/they-murdered-him-family-of-ups-driver-killed-in-shootout-lashes-out-at-police/

 

Quote

’They murdered him:’ Family of UPS driver killed in shootout lashes out at police

MIRAMAR – While mourning his death, the family of the UPS driver killed in Thursday’s shootout in Miramar is also lashing out at police who they believe are responsible for the loss of life.

“They murdered him,” said Joe Merino, the stepfather of Frank Ordonez. “I hope you can understand that and how I feel because it could have been prevented.”

While admitting he’s not a police officer, Merino wonders why there was a rush to open fire at the truck before other options were considered.

*Click link for more*

Link to post
Share on other sites

when do we find out who shot the innocent victims?  Surely there must be some forensic evidence, right?  Anyone know who started firing first?  I assume it was the criminals in the truck but I haven’t seen it definitively stated.  Did the police try to deescalate the situation at all?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Destino said:

when do we find out who shot the innocent victims?  Surely there must be some forensic evidence, right?  Anyone know who started firing first?  I assume it was the criminals in the truck but I haven’t seen it definitively stated.  Did the police try to deescalate the situation at all?

 

You trust them to admit it if they actually fired first? 

 

I've seen some people claiming the robbers used the UPS driver as a meat shield against the police. I saw the helicopter footage, they used civilians as shields in their vehicles. Multiple vehicles. At least three. Regardless of who shot first, that bystander in their vehicle is dead because they intentionally brought fire to their direction by hiding behind him or her. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a police officer, nor do I have any kind of training on police procedure, so I will ask for conversation's sake.  In a situation like this where the chopper had sights on the truck, police cars in pursuit, would it not have been better to have allowed the UPS truck to get out of a major traffic jam spot, sort of lead them away and then pounce where the risk to civilians was much lower?  The UPS driver is going to be in danger regardless, hard to get around that fact, however thinking of what could possibly go wrong by not only opening fire in the middle of the highway surrounded by civilians in their car, and then on top of that running to those vehicles to take cover?

 

It just doesn't come off well in a procedural sense.

Edited by NoCalMike
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, NoCalMike said:

It just doesn't come off well in a procedural sense.

 

You wonder if those cops were taught any kind of procedure at all. Initiating a gunfight in the middle of a crowded highway with pedestrians everywhere, while there is a hostage in the UPS truck itself? Using civilians as meat shields by using their cars for cover while in said shootout? Christ these cops are morons. Some people need to be held accountable for this **** show.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Watching the videos just after this happened,it's tough to say who shot first. Did see possible flashes from a weapon on the passenger side of the truck once it did start. I got the impression from the press conference that they're saying the suspects shot first. This is not completely unbelievable since they shot it out with the Jewelry store owner,(wounding an employee),before hijacking the UPS truck and kidnapping the driver. Easy to say they did no matter what though. The video I posted above,(you can hear the bullets whizzing by when the shooting starts),shows pedestrians strolling down the sidewalk towards where the chase was heading before the shooting starts.  That's gotta be one of the all time worst situations to be in if you're a cop and the bad guys start shooting. The bystander killed,btw,was in the car stopped in front of the person taking the video in the one I posted. All that said and instincts not withstanding,hiding behind bystanders' vehicles?  Yikes. SMDH  I'm with NCMike on this one. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TryTheBeal! said:

More guns are needed out on the streets.

 

There should be vending machines on each corner.  Like those for newspapers.  Just put in a quarter and grab a gun real quick so you can defend yourself.  Then have dropoff boxes, like mailboxes to return them when you're done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They charged him with assault because some skittish adults were frightened by an 11 year old boy playing dress up at a public park?  That’s embarrassing for everyone involved, or at least it should be.  Some people have no shame. 
 

On the bright side, the kid wasn’t murdered by cops that drove their car at him and shot him before he even had a chance to obey their commands.  

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We talk about police accountability all the time, but DAs too often get a pass.  They wield tremendous power, especially over the vast majority of America that can not afford a defense team.  Yet we almost never hear about any of them being held responsible for wrongful convictions where evidence was hidden or ignored.  Not when witnesses were intimidated, coaches, or u ethically incentivized.  They just banish people to prison, destroying their lives, and when the truth is revealed face no consequences.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.yahoo.com/news/got-tired-hunting-black-hispanic-165530610.html

 

'I Got Tired of Hunting Black and Hispanic People'

The New York TimesDecember 8, 2019, 8:55 AM PST
 
 

 

Quote

 

NEW YORK — At a police station tucked into an end-of-the-line subway terminal in South Brooklyn, the new commander instructed officers to think of white and Asian people as “soft targets” and urged them to instead go after blacks and Latinos for minor offenses like jumping the turnstile, a half-dozen officers said in sworn statements.

 

“You are stopping too many Russian and Chinese,” one of the officers, Daniel Perez, recalled the commander telling him earlier this decade. Another officer, Aaron Diaz, recalled the same commander saying in 2012, “You should write more black and Hispanic people.”

 

The sworn statements, gathered in the last few months as part of a discrimination lawsuit, deal with a period between 2011-15. But they are now emerging publicly at a time when policing in the subway has become a contentious issue, sparking protests over a crackdown on fare evasion and other low-level offenses.

 

The commander, Constantin Tsachas, was in charge of more than 100 officers who patrolled a swath of the subway system in Brooklyn, his first major command. Since then, he has been promoted to the second-in-command of policing the subway system throughout Brooklyn. Along the way, more than half a dozen subordinates claim, he gave them explicit directives about whom to arrest based on race. Those subordinates recently came forward, many for the first time, providing signed affidavits to support a discrimination lawsuit brought by four black and Hispanic police officers.

 

The officers claim they faced retaliation from the New York Police Department because they objected to what they said was a long-standing quota system for arrests and tickets, which they argued mainly affected black and Hispanic New Yorkers.

 

The authorities have deployed hundreds of additional officers to the subways, provoking a debate about overpolicing and the criminalization of poverty. Videos of arrests of young black men and of a woman selling churros in the subway system have gone viral in recent weeks. Demonstrators have taken to the subway system and jumped turnstiles in protest.

 

Six officers said in their affidavits that Tsachas, now a deputy inspector, pressured them to enforce low-level violations against black and Hispanic people, while discouraging them from doing the same to white or Asian people. Tsachas declined to comment when reached by telephone this week, but his union representative said the inspector denied the allegations of misconduct. The Police Department also declined to address the allegations. The department has said in the past that its enforcement of fare evasion is not aimed at black and Hispanic people.

 

More than three years ago, when Tsachas was promoted to his current rank, the police commissioner at the time, William J. Bratton, said that allegations Tsachas pushed quotas were false. “I have full faith and support in him,” Bratton said. He added that Tsachas had “the requisite skills and comes highly recommended.”

 

Most of the people arrested on charges of fare evasion in New York are black or Hispanic, according to data the Police Department has been required to report under local law since 2017. Between October 2017 and June 2019, black and Hispanic people, who account for slightly more than half the population in New York City, made up nearly 73% of those who got a ticket for fare evasion and whose race was recorded. They also made up more than 90% of those who were arrested, rather than given a ticket.

 

Some elected officials have complained about the apparent racial disparity in arrests, saying it may indicate bias on the part of officers or an unofficial policy of racial profiling by the police. “The focus of black and brown people, even if other people were doing the same crime, points to what many of us have been saying for a while,” the city’s public advocate, Jumaane Williams, said. “The same actions lead to different results, unfortunately, depending on where you live and an overlay of what you look like.”

 

Enforcement has surged nearly 50% in 2019, as city police officers issued 22,000 more tickets for fare evasion this year compared to 2018, according to Police Department data from Nov. 10. While the affidavits focus on a time period that ended nearly five years ago, they suggest at least one police commander openly pushed racial profiling when making arrests in the subway.

 

“I got tired of hunting Black and Hispanic people because of arrest quotas,” one former officer, Christopher LaForce, said in his affidavit, explaining his decision to retire in 2015. In the affidavits, the officers said that different enforcement standards applied to different stations across Transit District 34, which spanned stations across South Brooklyn: Brooklyn’s Chinatown in Sunset Park; neighborhoods with large Orthodox Jewish communities; a corner of Flatbush that is home to many Caribbean immigrants; and the Russian enclave around Brighton Beach.

 

“Tsachas would get angry if you tried to patrol subway stations in predominantly white or Asian neighborhoods” LaForce said in his affidavit. He added that the commander would redirect officers to stations in neighborhoods with larger black and Hispanic populations. Diaz, who retired from the Police Department last year, described in his affidavit how on one occasion Tsachas seemed irritated at him for having stopped several Asian people for fare evasion and told him he should be issuing tickets to “more black and Hispanic people.”

 

At the time, Diaz said, he was assigned to the N Line, which passes through neighborhoods with large numbers of Chinese Americans. He had arrested multiple residents of that neighborhoods for doubling up as they went through the turnstiles, according to his affidavit. Other officers described similar experiences. Some of the officers claimed in affidavits that Tsachas urged his officers to come up with reasons to stop black men, especially those with tattoos, and check them for warrants. Of the six officers, all but one is retired. They are all black or Hispanic. The affidavits were given to The New York Times by one of the four officers who has sued the Police Department, Lt. Edwin Raymond.

 

The allegations in the affidavits were bolstered by a police union official, Corey Grable, who gave a deposition in June in the same lawsuit that recounted his interactions with Tsachas. He recalled Tsachas had once complained about a subordinate who Tsachas said seemed to go for “soft targets.” Unsure what that meant, Grable asked if the officer was ticketing old ladies for minor offenses? Tsachas responded: “No, Asian.” Grable, who is black, asked, “Would you have been more comfortable if these guys were black or Hispanic?” “Yes,” Tsachas replied, according to Grable’s recollection.

 

Tsachas joined the Police Department in 2001 and patrolled public housing developments in Harlem for five years. He later analyzed crime patterns in Queens and across the city before being transferred to the Transit Bureau. He was a captain in 2011 when he was appointed to command Brooklyn’s District 34, a position he held for at least four years. In 2015, he took command of neighboring Transit District 32, where Raymond, who is currently suing him, worked. At the time Raymond held the rank of police officer.

 

Raymond has charged in the lawsuit that Tsachas blocked his promotion by giving him a low evaluation as punishment for not making enough arrests. Raymond, who is now a patrol supervisor in Brooklyn, recorded a conversation in October 2015 in which Tsachas encouraged him to arrest more people and gave an example of the sort of arrest he did not want: a 42-year-old Asian woman with no identification arrested on a charge of fare beating. “That’s not going to fly,” he said, according to the recording, first described in a New York Times Magazine article.

 

Raymond, who still had the rank of police officer at the time, responded that it was unconstitutional to consider race when deciding whom to arrest. Tsachas, a captain at the time, then apologized, saying the comment “didn’t come out the way it’s supposed to.” Raymond said he believed Tsachas should not have been promoted. “It’s a spit in the face of communities of color that this man is given more power after being exposed as a bigot,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 
Link to post
Share on other sites

VIDEO: ‘You just hit me’: Footage shows disgraced Fife police sergeant, 40, trying to frame his wife

 

A disgraced police sergeant, who tried to frame his wife by headbutting a door and claiming she punched him, has lost his job and been ordered to carry out community service.

 

He hoped to land his estranged wife in trouble but his plan backfired when a teenager filmed his “bizarre” ham acting antics on her mobile phone.

 

Footage above this story shows Murphy yelling “you just hit me, I cannot believe you just hit me” when there was no one close to him at the time.

 

He hoped to land his estranged wife in trouble but his plan backfired when a teenager filmed his “bizarre” ham acting antics on her mobile phone.

 

Footage above this story shows Murphy yelling “you just hit me, I cannot believe you just hit me” when there was no one close to him at the time.

 

Click on the link for the full article and video

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...