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The Official QB Thread- With Howell the Season Went and the #2 Pick, What's next. Including Rookie QB Talk.


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6 hours ago, redskinss said:

Ok guys help me out.

Do I start lamar Jackson against a steelers defense that has given him fits in the past or do I give Howell his first start of the season against a bad bears defense?

 

 

Always take the rushing upside at QB, dude. Even if Lamar can’t complete passes, he’s dominating on the ground 

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I wonder who Sam has around as mentors. I figure college coaches and his dad, but old QBs? Old Redskins QBs? Other teams QBs? Other players? Failed QBs? 

 

I used to wonder about this as I was building my team of mentors. I'd think about who Jason Campbell or Donovan McNabb or Steve Young would call after a bad game. Do they just go to their teammates or locker room? Do they just go home to the family? And how do they make sure that it's not a stone rolling down a hill gaining momentum? 

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3 minutes ago, Thinking Skins said:

I wonder who Sam has around as mentors. I figure college coaches and his dad, but old QBs? Old Redskins QBs? Other teams QBs? Other players? Failed QBs? 

 

I used to wonder about this as I was building my team of mentors. I'd think about who Jason Campbell or Donovan McNabb or Steve Young would call after a bad game. Do they just go to their teammates or locker room? Do they just go home to the family? And how do they make sure that it's not a stone rolling down a hill gaining momentum? 

I believe his main man is the qb coach/trainer he’s worked with since HS.  There was a really interesting Keim interview with the guy… sounds like a really good parternship.  And then I know he’s become close with Daniel Jones (for better or for worse).  Obviously there’s EB, Pritchard and Zampese as well, though I don’t know what kind of relationship is there beyond professional.

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18 minutes ago, skinny21 said:

I believe his main man is the qb coach/trainer he’s worked with since HS.  There was a really interesting Keim interview with the guy… sounds like a really good parternship.  And then I know he’s become close with Daniel Jones (for better or for worse).  Obviously there’s EB, Pritchard and Zampese as well, though I don’t know what kind of relationship is there beyond professional.

Very interesting regarding the HS coach, thanks for that. I hope he is tight with one of the team coaches as well. Love the question @Thinking Skins

 

Where in the world did this unity with Dimes come from. That is disheartening considering he leads a division rival (and the team I dislike the most) plus that he really isn't that great and has some bad habits we want Howell to avoid or rid himself of. 

 

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good read 

 

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/38568901/the-rise-commanders-qb-sam-howell

 

"He was always in the building," Mack Brown said. "He has no hobbies. He's a football junkie, a gym rat. Before he had his current girlfriend, it was Valentine's Day and I said, 'You got a date? Doing anything? He said, 'Yeah, I've got a date with Madden.' We used to laugh and say he's been in the building more than I have."

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22 minutes ago, skinny21 said:

I believe his main man is the qb coach/trainer he’s worked with since HS.  There was a really interesting Keim interview with the guy… sounds like a really good parternship.  And then I know he’s become close with Daniel Jones (for better or for worse).  Obviously there’s EB, Pritchard and Zampese as well, though I don’t know what kind of relationship is there beyond professional.

 

I think Jacoby Brissett is also a mentor of sorts for Sam.

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44 minutes ago, skinny21 said:

I believe his main man is the qb coach/trainer he’s worked with since HS.  There was a really interesting Keim interview with the guy… sounds like a really good parternship.  And then I know he’s become close with Daniel Jones (for better or for worse).  Obviously there’s EB, Pritchard and Zampese as well, though I don’t know what kind of relationship is there beyond professional.

I'm not mad about this. I was thinkins about this a lttle the other day when I posted the stats about the QBs with 3 ints and 8 sacks and saw some notable names (Warren Moon, Randall Cunningham, Troy Aikman, Sam Darnold, etc) and seeing that you say thats a nice club to belong to. But then you say that the set of QBs in the NFL is a nice set to belong to. So Even though Daniel Jones doesn't quite belong to this exact club right now, the game he had on Monday night just about gets him entry (if we say 3 turnovers instead of 3 ints). Plus there's this whole rivalry thing about Jones going to Duke and Howell going to NC which I'm sure gets them going. 

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1 hour ago, Thinking Skins said:

I wonder who Sam has around as mentors. I figure college coaches and his dad, but old QBs? Old Redskins QBs? Other teams QBs? Other players? Failed QBs? 

 

I used to wonder about this as I was building my team of mentors. I'd think about who Jason Campbell or Donovan McNabb or Steve Young would call after a bad game. Do they just go to their teammates or locker room? Do they just go home to the family? And how do they make sure that it's not a stone rolling down a hill gaining momentum? 

 

From what I heard Brissett and big time so.  That's supposedly who he's closest too aside from Dyami.  Keim among others have talked about it.  Brissett for example was the one who spearheaded the get together in South Florida with the receivers.  He's shared with him what he's learned from being in the QB room with Brady, etc.  The vibe I get is Brissett has been a mentor on steroids for Howell.  And Brissett in general has the reputation for being a super good guy.

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Just now, Skinsinparadise said:

 

From what I heard Brissett and big time so.  That's supposedly who he's closest too aside from Dyami.  Keim among others have talked about it.  Brissett for example was the one who spearheaded the get together in South Florida with the receivers.  He's shared with him what he's learned from being in the QB room with Brady, etc.  The vibe I get is Brissett has been a mentor on steroids for Howell.  And Brissett in general has the reputation for being a super good guy.

I hear that, but IMO, they can't have that close of a relationship where Howell's calling Brissett up after a game like Buffalo. But then again, how much closer can it get outside of a locker room with a former QB like Campbell or Smith though so maybe you're right. Maybe though he just keeps it all inside and just doesn't really open up to anybody and just balls out. 

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The rise of Commanders QB Sam Howell

ASHBURN, Va. -- Sam Howell needed to make a choice.

It was a day before North Carolina's 2019 spring game, and the true freshman quarterback was playing rock, paper, scissors to determine which candidate for the starting quarterback job would get first chance at impressing the coaches.

Howell won (he chose scissors), and it was the only opportunity he needed.

Howell was competing with two redshirt freshmen for the job: Cade Fortin and Jace Ruder. Howell's talent was obvious. But coach Mack Brown didn't know how he'd handle the pressure.

 

But when Howell took the field, he delivered on one of his first throws.

"He turned it loose and zipped it. It was a perfect strike. We all said, 'Wow,'" Brown said. "That was one of the first times we knew he wasn't going to panic in front of people."

 

There were hiccups: Howell tossed three picks early in those spring practices. He didn't throw another one.

"I was worried about him losing his confidence," Brown said. "He didn't even blink. Very mature for his age and experience. He does not get rattled."

Those traits helped enable Howell to go from becoming North Carolina's first true freshman starting quarterback to being named the ACC's rookie of the year. His 38 touchdown passes set an FBS record for a freshman. He helped elevate the Tar Heels almost immediately before leaving after three years as the school's record holder in 27 different categories, including passing yards (10,283), passing touchdowns (92) and career passing efficiency (164.2).

 

Looking back to that first season at North Carolina, it's clear why there's a belief Howell can succeed in the NFL. From his preparation to his demeanor, Howell displayed key traits that helped him go from a prized recruit, to early enrollee, to program-changer.

It's what Washington hopes he'll become for a franchise that hasn't had the same quarterback as full-time starter for more than three seasons since 1993, and hasn't had a first-team All-Pro quarterback since Joe Theismann in 1983.

"He's special," said Brown, whose first season at UNC coincided with Howell's, "and he's the reason we're sitting here where we are. [North Carolina] won five games in the two years before us, then went to four straight bowls. If you ask me the No. 1 reason, it would be Sam Howell."

 

HOWELL SAT AT his locker on Sept. 27, casually chatting with a media member. Moments later, he was having a conversation with backup quarterback Jacoby Brissett, whose locker was next to his. Next, someone from the equipment room wandered over for a brief exchange. It would have been difficult for an outsider to have known just three days earlier, Howell had thrown four interceptions in a 37-3 loss to the Buffalo Bills -- his worst performance as a pro.

"I put that game behind me and worry about the next game," Howell said of his philosophy. "I go back to my process, doing what's always worked for me and never losing that confidence.

"Ever since the game ended Sunday, I was excited for the next game just because I'm ready for another opportunity, I'm ready to go out there and play like myself again."

The next game: He threw for 290 yards and one touchdown in an overtime loss to the undefeated Philadelphia Eagles.

That demeanor was shaped long ago. Howell has always been low-key about his success and didn't panic over his miscues.

 

"As far as getting emotional, that's never been him," said his father, Duke, who was his offensive coordinator at Sun Valley High School in the Charlotte area. "When he was in high school, he would throw a pick and I was up in the booth and I'd get on the headset and all I could do was hear him breathe. He never said a word. I'd ask what happened and he'd say such and such. I'd go back and watch the film and, yeah, that did happen."

It's part of why Howell is comfortable in tense situations. In the last two minutes of the half and regulation this season, he has thrown for a league-high 375 yards with three touchdowns to one interception. Washington has scored 34 points in those situations, including a tying touchdown on the final play of regulation Sunday. The 23-year-old Howell said in the huddle his job is to, "Just try to calm the storm."

 

..."He was always in the building," Mack Brown said. "He has no hobbies. He's a football junkie, a gym rat. Before he had his current girlfriend, it was Valentine's Day and I said, 'You got a date? Doing anything? He said, 'Yeah, I've got a date with Madden.' We used to laugh and say he's been in the building more than I have."

Duke witnessed his son's football evolution in the spring of 2020, when he lived at home during the pandemic. He'd catch Howell on videoconferences with his Tar Heels coaches.

"Just the things he knew, that he had learned in one year, they put a lot on him," Duke said. "He was talking about defensive fronts, knowing the fronts to check to a good play. Most quarterbacks are studying coverages. He was more IDing the front, making calls, what the protections are, checking the protections. Stuff like that; he was light years ahead from the year before."

Because Howell enrolled in January -- cutting short his senior year of high school -- he needed to catch up fast. Howell did not have a veteran quarterback to learn from. His two competitors were both redshirt freshmen. But, at a time when he should have been prepping for his final high school baseball season, he was displaying his promise in UNC's spring practices.

"We went to town on learning the offense," said Longo, now at Wisconsin. "We set up a schedule to meet and he didn't miss a minute. He pounded the film and he'd come in every day and have a list of questions and have an agenda. He's just incredible from a want-to standpoint. His talent was ahead in the spring. Everything else was by the summer."

Personal quarterback coach Anthony Boone said that rapid growth is not surprising. He has experienced it while working with Howell as well.

"It's not something you had to tell him; he just did it," Boone said. "He read online, 'This is what quarterbacks do,' and he took it to heart."

 

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/38568901/the-rise-commanders-qb-sam-howell

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Skinsinparadise said:

The rise of Commanders QB Sam Howell

ASHBURN, Va. -- Sam Howell needed to make a choice.

It was a day before North Carolina's 2019 spring game, and the true freshman quarterback was playing rock, paper, scissors to determine which candidate for the starting quarterback job would get first chance at impressing the coaches.

Howell won (he chose scissors), and it was the only opportunity he needed.

Howell was competing with two redshirt freshmen for the job: Cade Fortin and Jace Ruder. Howell's talent was obvious. But coach Mack Brown didn't know how he'd handle the pressure.

 

But when Howell took the field, he delivered on one of his first throws.

"He turned it loose and zipped it. It was a perfect strike. We all said, 'Wow,'" Brown said. "That was one of the first times we knew he wasn't going to panic in front of people."

 

There were hiccups: Howell tossed three picks early in those spring practices. He didn't throw another one.

"I was worried about him losing his confidence," Brown said. "He didn't even blink. Very mature for his age and experience. He does not get rattled."

Those traits helped enable Howell to go from becoming North Carolina's first true freshman starting quarterback to being named the ACC's rookie of the year. His 38 touchdown passes set an FBS record for a freshman. He helped elevate the Tar Heels almost immediately before leaving after three years as the school's record holder in 27 different categories, including passing yards (10,283), passing touchdowns (92) and career passing efficiency (164.2).

 

Looking back to that first season at North Carolina, it's clear why there's a belief Howell can succeed in the NFL. From his preparation to his demeanor, Howell displayed key traits that helped him go from a prized recruit, to early enrollee, to program-changer.

It's what Washington hopes he'll become for a franchise that hasn't had the same quarterback as full-time starter for more than three seasons since 1993, and hasn't had a first-team All-Pro quarterback since Joe Theismann in 1983.

"He's special," said Brown, whose first season at UNC coincided with Howell's, "and he's the reason we're sitting here where we are. [North Carolina] won five games in the two years before us, then went to four straight bowls. If you ask me the No. 1 reason, it would be Sam Howell."

 

HOWELL SAT AT his locker on Sept. 27, casually chatting with a media member. Moments later, he was having a conversation with backup quarterback Jacoby Brissett, whose locker was next to his. Next, someone from the equipment room wandered over for a brief exchange. It would have been difficult for an outsider to have known just three days earlier, Howell had thrown four interceptions in a 37-3 loss to the Buffalo Bills -- his worst performance as a pro.

"I put that game behind me and worry about the next game," Howell said of his philosophy. "I go back to my process, doing what's always worked for me and never losing that confidence.

"Ever since the game ended Sunday, I was excited for the next game just because I'm ready for another opportunity, I'm ready to go out there and play like myself again."

The next game: He threw for 290 yards and one touchdown in an overtime loss to the undefeated Philadelphia Eagles.

That demeanor was shaped long ago. Howell has always been low-key about his success and didn't panic over his miscues.

 

"As far as getting emotional, that's never been him," said his father, Duke, who was his offensive coordinator at Sun Valley High School in the Charlotte area. "When he was in high school, he would throw a pick and I was up in the booth and I'd get on the headset and all I could do was hear him breathe. He never said a word. I'd ask what happened and he'd say such and such. I'd go back and watch the film and, yeah, that did happen."

It's part of why Howell is comfortable in tense situations. In the last two minutes of the half and regulation this season, he has thrown for a league-high 375 yards with three touchdowns to one interception. Washington has scored 34 points in those situations, including a tying touchdown on the final play of regulation Sunday. The 23-year-old Howell said in the huddle his job is to, "Just try to calm the storm."

 

..."He was always in the building," Mack Brown said. "He has no hobbies. He's a football junkie, a gym rat. Before he had his current girlfriend, it was Valentine's Day and I said, 'You got a date? Doing anything? He said, 'Yeah, I've got a date with Madden.' We used to laugh and say he's been in the building more than I have."

Duke witnessed his son's football evolution in the spring of 2020, when he lived at home during the pandemic. He'd catch Howell on videoconferences with his Tar Heels coaches.

"Just the things he knew, that he had learned in one year, they put a lot on him," Duke said. "He was talking about defensive fronts, knowing the fronts to check to a good play. Most quarterbacks are studying coverages. He was more IDing the front, making calls, what the protections are, checking the protections. Stuff like that; he was light years ahead from the year before."

Because Howell enrolled in January -- cutting short his senior year of high school -- he needed to catch up fast. Howell did not have a veteran quarterback to learn from. His two competitors were both redshirt freshmen. But, at a time when he should have been prepping for his final high school baseball season, he was displaying his promise in UNC's spring practices.

"We went to town on learning the offense," said Longo, now at Wisconsin. "We set up a schedule to meet and he didn't miss a minute. He pounded the film and he'd come in every day and have a list of questions and have an agenda. He's just incredible from a want-to standpoint. His talent was ahead in the spring. Everything else was by the summer."

Personal quarterback coach Anthony Boone said that rapid growth is not surprising. He has experienced it while working with Howell as well.

"It's not something you had to tell him; he just did it," Boone said. "He read online, 'This is what quarterbacks do,' and he took it to heart."

 

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/38568901/the-rise-commanders-qb-sam-howell

 

 

good read. guy has a lot of knowledge and works hard. 

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55 minutes ago, DWinzit said:

Very interesting regarding the HS coach, thanks for that. I hope he is tight with one of the team coaches as well. Love the question @Thinking Skins

 

Where in the world did this unity with Dimes come from. That is disheartening considering he leads a division rival (and the team I dislike the most) plus that he really isn't that great and has some bad habits we want Howell to avoid or rid himself of. 

 

He talked about in on Hang Time.  They’re both from Charlotte and during covid they connected and became friends.  So same hometown, same sport/position, played for rival schools (Duke/UNC), and of course Jones had the experience of making it into the NFL.  I doubt there’s any mentoring in terms of teaching qbing skills though.

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4 minutes ago, ixcuincle said:

good read. guy has a lot of knowledge and works hard. 

 

So many failures in the NFL with young QBs.  Common theme among coaches on that front.

 

A. Can't process the field fast enough

 

B.  Work ethic

 

Howell certainly has B.  And I suspect he's fine as to processing the field quickly too but will see.  I am definitely optimisitc about him.  As Keim likes to say his work ethic reminds him of Kirk when he was in the building.

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10 minutes ago, Skinsinparadise said:

 

So many failures in the NFL with young QBs.  Common theme among coaches on that front.

 

A. Can't process the field fast enough

 

B.  Work ethic

 

Howell certainly has B.  And I suspect he's fine as to processing the field quickly too but will see.  I am definitely optimisitc about him.  As Keim likes to say his work ethic reminds him of Kirk when he was in the building.

 

This was evident in the first preseason appearance by Howell.  Yes, it was against 4th stringers, but he did not look completely lost.  I distinctly remember Matt Corral looking very lost in that game.  I don't even know if he's still on a roster and he was drafted before Howell.  

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9 minutes ago, Warhead36 said:

Man what a coup it'd be if he could turn into a franchise QB. We are soooo due some good luck and landing one in the 5th round would be gigantic. 

Not to mention the schadenfreude for Tanya Snyder's gimp. 

 

Idiot.

Just now, DJHJR86 said:

 

This was evident in the first preseason appearance by Howell.  Yes, it was against 4th stringers, but he did not look completely lost.  I distinctly remember Matt Corral looking very lost in that game.  I don't even know if he's still on a roster and he was drafted before Howell.  

Also Desmond Ridder is a JAG. 

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The best article IMO on Sam is one I've posted multiple times but I'll post again for those who missed it

 

Sam Howell wants to be the greatest QB ever

The North Carolina gunslinger may be the gem in this mysterious quarterback class. Oddly enough, he's been hiding in plain sight. Yes, his goals are quite lofty, too.

When Sam Howell starts to answer the question, it sure sounds like he’ll off-ramp into Cliché County. A safe haven with the biggest moment of his football life closing in. Can’t blame him, really.

Are you the best quarterback in the draft?

“Oh yeah. No doubt,” he begins. “But at the end of the day, it’s not about that for me. It’s not about being the best quarterback in this draft. It’s about going into a team with a good situation.”

But he’s not finished.

“Obviously I am so confident in who I am, and my game, that I think I’m the best quarterback in the NFL already. That’s just who I am as a person and who I’ll continue to be.”

He didn’t stutter and he’s not trying to be provocative, either. This is sincerely what Howell, the 6-foot, 224-pound record-setter from North Carolina believes. Through this conversation, he adds that it’s his goal to go down as the greatest player ever, too. Howell insists one must think in this manner to play the position.

“Confidence,” he adds,” is definitely something you have to have.”

 

...He wasn’t smashing records as a dink-and-dunk distributor in a popgun offense, either. At the NFL Combine, Howell displayed the strongest arm in the group with a throw of 59 miles per hour — the fourth-fastest throw measured since 2008.

After banner seasons in 2019 and 2020, Howell lost two receivers and two backs to the NFL and his passing numbers dipped in 2021. Even then, he introduced a new skill in his repertoire by rushing for 828 yards and 11 touchdowns. He also happens to be the youngest quarterback in the class at 21 years old.

 

It’s hard to believe he’s been mostly an afterthought on the national level. We’re not discussing Sam Howell nearly enough.  

Probably nobody’s surprised more than the man himself who repeats that he isn’t using the silence as motivation whatsoever.

“My three years of film at North Carolina speak for itself,” Howell says. “I have no limitations athletically. I can make any throw on the field, and I can use my legs as a weapon in the running game. Mentally, I can master any playbook any coordinator would want to run. There would be no limitations with where that coordinator would want to go with that system. And I think my ability to rally a team and get a group of guys going and all working towards one goal is one of my strengths. I truly believe I do that better than anyone.”

 

...His creed as an athlete is point-blank: “Every single thing I do is with a purpose and that purpose being to win. I have a lot of goals, a lot of dreams and things I want to accomplish in my life.”

One of those dreams is being the greatest ever. Putting something so lofty into reality, to him, starts with outworking everyone. North Carolina’s head coach, Mack Brown, has called Howell the hardest worker on the team and Howell says he takes pride in knowing he prepared better than anybody else on any given field. “What can I do to separate myself that other people won’t do?” he adds. Howell seeks and edge — always.

 

...“It’s almost mind-boggling how impressively sharp he is,” says Boone, who runs the “QB Country” Charlotte division. “He’s got the ability to process and learn at an extremely high level. That’s what’s going to keep him in the league a long time and, in my opinion, longer than the guys in his class.

 

“The media has hyped all these other guys. OK, so this guy ran a 4.4. Great. How many guys are going to need to run a 4.4 day-in and day-out besides Lamar Jackson? Not many. Lamar Jackson is the only one whose 4.4 speed actually translates. Him, Kyler Murray, but everyone else who runs a 4.4 may spray it a little bit or may not process at a high level. That’s great if it helps but the most successful guys who have played the position don’t run 4.4s or they don’t throw it 70 yards. Nowadays, we’re trying to change the mold of what the quarterback position looks like and what it feels like and what’s important. Look at the intangibles. Look at red-flag issues. That stuff matters. I don’t want to give a guy $20 million and worry about him doing something crazy when he’s not around the facility. That’s a big responsibility. I think more people try to spend time finding what’s wrong with him and pick at little things rather than just flat-out saying, ‘Listen. He’s probably the safest pick in the draft.”

 

...He has spoken to a few teams who’ve tried to poke holes and, every time, his response is the same: “This dude is a damn machine.” He calls Howell the prototypical counter. He’s not necessarily flashy — at all — but Boone compares him to New Orleans Saints great Drew Brees. He sees that level of upside. And that’s a name Howell isn’t afraid to bring up himself.

Brees managed just fine as a 6-footer, retiring as the league’s all-time leading passer.

 

“I’m a huge fan of Drew Brees,” Howell says. “I’m in love with the way he prepares for games. You can tell he has a plan for the ball before the ball is even snapped. He’s always on time. … Obviously, he’s not the biggest guy. And late in his career, he wasn’t the strongest guy. He didn’t have the strongest arm. But you really couldn’t tell the difference. He’s always on time and always knew where he wanted to go with the ball. You just have to find those throwing lanes.”

 

Howell makes clear that there’s nothing anyone could say that’d motivate him more than he already is. Slights mean little. Don’t hold their breath for a zinger to the local media about making a team pay for the duration of his career.

“I don’t play this game to prove my doubters wrong,” Howell says. “That’s just now who I am.”

Because, again, his motivation comes from a different place. (His voice is laced with a southern bluntness.)

“To be the greatest who ever played the game,” he says. “That’s truly what I want to accomplish in my life, and what I can accomplish.”

 

...“I play with a fearless mindset,” Howell says. “I’m not scared of anybody. I’m going to throw my body on the line and do whatever I can to help my team win games. I think playing with that fearless mindset is contagious throughout the team. That’s why I do it. I want to set the tone for my team and let everybody know, ‘We’re here. It’s going to be a fight. No one’s going to walk in here and have an easy game. If they want to beat us, it’s going to be a dog fight.’”

 

As for being the best QB in the sport right now? And wanting to be the greatest ever?

It’s no act. He’s not reading from a script. If anything, Howell is described by scouts as an extremely quiet kid. Simply, this is how he lives his life day to day. Howell’s coach has been hearing this same exact stuff as far back as high school.

Now, Boone cannot wait to see Howell get a chance to put those words into action.

Maybe this draft is memorable after all.

 

“Listen,” he says, “this kid has been telling me this same kind of stuff his entire life. He broke every single record in North Carolina, in the history of the state. He broke every record at Chapel Hill, in the history of the school. I’m not going to put it past him. Just because of the kind of dude he is.

“The way he works. The way he prepares. Who he is.”  

 

https://www.golongtd.com/p/sam-howell-wants-to-be-the-greatest

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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When Howell has been kept clean, he is completing 73.8%% of his passes for 7.2 Y/A with three touchdowns and an interception compared to a 48.6% completion rate, 5.9 Y/A with one touchdown and four interceptions when pressured.

If you were starting Justin Herbert, Deshaun Watson, or Geno Smith to this point, Howell is arguably the top streamer of the week.

 

https://www.sharpfootballanalysis.com/fantasy/commanders-bears-week-5-fantasy-football-preview-worksheet-rich-hribar-2023/

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34 minutes ago, skinny21 said:

I’m gonna do everyone a solid by adding this disclaimer - this video will literally take 20+ minutes off your life.

 

(though you do learn which shorts are Howell’s favorite… so there’s that)

 

Well she is not a mentor in his life, maybe she is, but at least he has support off the field as well. We all need a balance in our lives to keep us grounded. :) 

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On 10/4/2023 at 11:10 AM, skinsfan66 said:

I am thinking Brian Daboll scammed the Giants as a good coach.  He lost it on the side line berated his QB everytime he came off the field. His OL looked like s... 11 sacks. They could not Run, Pass.  Do they have any NFL starter grade WR's on the team to get open? Some great offseason they had? On the 98 yd pick six by the rookie CB, he made a great move for a great play.   

This whole situation in NY is such a beautiful thing to watch unfold. Did Dan Snyder buy into their ownership or something? I hope John Mara is ****ing crying every week when he signs Dan Jones' paycheck. 

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2 hours ago, Skinsinparadise said:

 

So many failures in the NFL with young QBs.  Common theme among coaches on that front.

 

A. Can't process the field fast enough

 

B.  Work ethic

 

Howell certainly has B.  And I suspect he's fine as to processing the field quickly too but will see.  I am definitely optimisitc about him.  As Keim likes to say his work ethic reminds him of Kirk when he was in the building.

And if Sam Howell works out for us, which I believe he will, credit will be due to RR for 1). drafting Howell in the 5th round and 2). bringing in EB to develop him. 

 

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27 minutes ago, kingdaddy said:

This whole situation in NY is such a beautiful thing to watch unfold. Did Dan Snyder buy into their ownership or something? I hope John Mara is ****ing crying every week when he signs Dan Jones' paycheck. 

image.jpeg.d5764d72bee8785c310dc006b641c470.jpeg

And if Sam Howell works out for us, which I believe he will, credit will be due to RR for 1). drafting Howell in the 5th round and 2). bringing in EB to develop him. 

 

This is where I will cite my dscussion with Craig Hoffman because he was saying to fire RR for his draft fails in the first round and I was saying 

 

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RR may have found a STEAL at the most important position IN ALL OF SPORTS IN THE FIFTH ROUND. He was trying to debate me on the "value" of a first and second rounder over lower round picks but I was telling him that there is nothing more valuable than a QB and nothing cheaper than a low round pick so this is a win win scenario. And, the Galdi / Sheehan argument goes that this league is not about defense any more its all about having a good to great QB. the above average defenses can hold you above water for a while but they will crumble like the rest without a QB. So what RR is doing right now is getting us out of that "at best" middle of the pack and into that potential top tier of the league (regardless of who the coach is). 

 

True, we could have spent picks better on OG/OT and other picks, but I still wonder if Ron would use them similar to how Ron is using our S and our rookies this year and how he used our rookies last year and the year before. Basically it takes a stroke of luck (bad luck for somebody else) and really good play by the rookie to get them on the field. Just look at whats going on with our OG. We could shuffle the line and put Cosbi at RT and the rookie at OG and have Wiley on the bench and have a younger potentially better line, but we're not because he hasn't "earned it". 

 

 

Edited by Thinking Skins
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