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Presidential Election:11/3/20- On to Iowa 2/3 & New Hampshire 2/11

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Tulsi boycotting the debate (a flawed, yet national forum), which is another opportunity to talk to democratic voters about why she is the best candidate. However I bet she will keep going on Tucker Carlson to aid in Fox News's goal to use her as a proxy to paint the entire field of Democrats as bad.  Come on Tulsi be smarter.  Those Fox News viewers are never going to vote for you. 

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2 hours ago, Fresh8686 said:

 

Only the Top 3 are prospective nominees. Pete has no minority support.  Michael's only shot is a contested convention and he got it;

The Bernie voters would stay home. Amy is going nowhere.

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Every time I see these polls I have to wonder if they are just indicators of the popular vote and have little indication or breakdown of how it translates into the EC?

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49 minutes ago, NoCalMike said:

Every time I see these polls I have to wonder if they are just indicators of the popular vote and have little indication or breakdown of how it translates into the EC?

 

Yes, but Trump not getting over 43% is good news.  

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Why Do So Many Regular Heartland Voters Live in a Bubble?

 

When Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax proposal came up during the October Democratic debate in Ohio, Pete Buttigieg was ready with a big statement. From the perspective of the “industrial Midwest” that he calls home, Buttigieg said, plans like Warren’s were all too familiar—the work of “Washington politicians, congressmen, and senators saying all the right things, offering the most elegant policy prescriptions,” who can’t get anything done in the real world. In the end, “nothing changes,” Buttigieg lamented—and “the empty factories that I would see out the windows of my dad’s Chevy Cavalier when he drove me to school” remain empty.

 

The attack encapsulated the Democratic primary perfectly. You can’t throw a rock at the 2020 field without hitting a rival of Bernie Sanders’ and Elizabeth Warren’s who says their platforms are fantasies that insult the common sense of regular heartland Americans.

 

Buttigieg had plenty of company in October. “I think we owe it to the American people to tell them where we’re going to send the invoice,” said Amy Klobuchar when the subject of “Medicare for All” came up. “What really bothers me about this discussion, which we’ve had so many times, is that we don’t talk about the things that I’m hearing about from regular Americans.”

 

Joe Biden, in his comments about universal health coverage, complained that Sanders and Warren’s plans would adversely affect a hypothetical family involving “a fireman and a schoolteacher.” (Women can be firefighters too, Joseph!) Plain ol’ folks, using the wisdom they’ve honed by doing the family budget with an adding machine at the kitchen table of their farmhouse, know that it would be impossible for the United States to pay for universal health care or public college programs, and that such utopian daydreams are the domain of activists and eggheads you’d find inside liberal “bubbles”—a Harvard faculty lounge, say, or on a collective farm in Vermont.

 

The antidote to such sheltered, unrealistic dreaming, these candidates have argued, is their own willingness and ability to unite the country’s regular folk behind more modest plans. Said Klobuchar: “You know, this isn’t a flyover part of the country to me. The heartland is where I live. And I want to win those states that we lost last time.” She described having worked closely with the late John McCain, suggesting that the experience would help her persuade “independents and moderate Republicans” to vote for her. Biden—who calls himself “Middle-Class Joe” and often mentions that he grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania—also cited his friendship with McCain. He has said that he will be able to pass legislation through Congress because Republicans will have an “epiphany” about national unity after Donald Trump is removed.

 

In November’s debate, Buttigieg made a similar argument: “I’m running to be the president for that day the sun comes up and the Trump presidency is behind us, which will be a tender moment in the life of this country. And we are going to have to unify a nation that will be as divided as ever.” He explained that he’s demonstrated the ability to unify as mayor of South Bend, Indiana: “I know how to bring people together to get things done. I know that from the perspective of Washington, what goes on in my city might look small, but frankly, where we live, the infighting on Capitol Hill is what looks small.” (Buttigieg’s present appeal to any given individual might be best measured by how much the “frankly” in that sentence makes them want to puke.)

 

Biden and Buttigieg are the candidates for voters who think Sanders and Warren are too extreme on policy, but also for the ones who want the election, purely on the level of tone, to be about “bringing the country together” instead of leading one group to victory over another. (The phrase pops up repeatedly when voters and elected officials give their endorsements of Biden and Mayor Pete.) This pitch has been very effective. Together, Biden and Buttigieg have the support of about 40 percent of the Democratic electorate nationally and in Iowa. Their support skews older, which tracks with a New York Times poll of Iowa that found that while “85 percent of voters under 30 said they preferred a nominee promising fundamental change,” 7 in 10 of those older than 65 wanted a candidate who would bring back “normalcy in Washington.”

 

Click on the link for the rest

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2 hours ago, BRAVEONAWARPATH said:

 

 

Because like most bullies, he's really a coward and afraid to face tough questions about the impeachment and all his lies.

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I wonder what things would be like if some of these candidates were out there campaigning for impeachment instead of the presidency.

Edited by visionary

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3 hours ago, visionary said:

I wonder what things would be like if some of these candidates were out there campaigning for impeachment instead of the presidency.

Like Tom Steyer?

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Thanks for the name change. I think my invention of IMPOTUS ought to go viral. Hasn’t yet been pick d up, but ya got to start somewhere 

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My call for laws against voter suppression include judges that order purges of voter lists except for dead people.

 

It's up to every individual to make sure their registration is current. If a person moves, it's up to them to update their registration including removal if to a different location.

 

I removed my name from Fairfax county when I moved so I could register in Texas. I wanted to make sure my votes count.

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