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Tesla Model 3 Release


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Personal preference I guess. Never understood the love for these things. In south Florida they are everywhere and they look like a cheap model for a Maserati

 

The ridiculous speed and the fact that I haven't bought gas since January. 

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The ridiculous speed and the fact that I haven't bought gas since January. 

 

Trust me, I am a speed junkie... I used to build and sell muscle cars as side projects. Got old being in Fairfax County and never being able to use that speed. Lingenfelter Corvettes are true speed but going 2 mph in bumper-to-bumper got old real quick with a strong dual-friction clutch.

 

Glad you enjoy it, just not my cup of tea. Could buy a Prius for a lot less and still save on gas. Probably about a $75,000 difference.

 

Normally I wasn't buying a Mustang Cobra so save on gas but I can understand the benefits.

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I'm excited minimum of 215 mile range and a 0-69 under 6 seconds standard. All wheel drive will be available as well as a sub 0-60 of 4 seconds.

No gas, no oil change completely updated through wi-if. Autonomous driving included can't complain about much from what I've seen.

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Doesn't the volt only have a 40 mile range on a full-charge and then switches to the fuel reserve tank?

 

Gen 2 has 51 miles. In spring time its getting up to 60

 

Since I only have about a 3 mile commute, 51-60 miles is plenty for me. If I have to do a long ride, the hybrid engine kicks in. 

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Tesla has also done a solid job in getting recharging stations set up across the country. When and if this model drops and is bought at a significant higher rate than the previous models, that infrastructure will be tested. But I suspect the higher demand will also lead to more locations.

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↑↑↑

 

Tesla has a calculator (edit..apparently you have to click on the calculators tab below the pic of the car - an it also helps to have your recent electrical bill in hand) to get an estimate on electricity costs.

 

Or you could pair it with solar panels and their upcoming Tesla Powerwall. :D

 

https://www.teslamotors.com/models-charging/#/calculator

Edited by The Evil Genius
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Definitely am in no shape to get one by 2017.

 

Maybe by 2018-2019 range though.

 

Would love one as a stepping stone to a decked out Model S somewhere down the line.  That is a fancy looking car, and in the 35K range, I figure I can get a run-of-the-mill baseline Benz or BMW, or nab one of those babies.

 

And any issues will have hopefully been ironed out with the 2nd or 3rd year of production too.

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So how much do these things spike your electricity bill?

I think I'll stick with gas myself. The concept is interesting, but I'll wait for the long term results before essentially becoming a test pilot.

I wonder why no one has tried to design standardized modular batteries that can be exchanged for a fully charged one at a gas station. Kind of like propane tanks. I'm aware that they are heavy, but we're talking about gas stations, heavy equipment is no sweat for the ones with autoshops. Having the option to swap out for longer distances, in emergencies, or even because we all know batteries degrade over time and not having our car tied to just one would ease a lot of my concerns. It also provides a means of easily addressing safety issues with lithium ion batteries, which can explode when they aren't in great shape or improperly charged, by easily rotating damaged ones out of service. All of this using existing infrastructure and giving gas stations a role to play, even if it is less frequent than filling up.

I'm sure this idea is impossible for a thousand reasons, but it's fun to think about.

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I put down a deposit for one.  What the hell, why not.  If I change my mind at any time, I'll just take it back.

 

The front end of the Model 3 doesn't really do it for me. The rest is fine.  A ton is likely to change between now and production, so time will tell.

 

In terms of early production issues, the current reservation list is in the 6 digits at this point, so it's going to be 2018 or 2019 before I (theoretically) get one anyway.  By that time I may be driving a George Jetson car, because the future is always awesome.

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I wonder why no one has tried to design standardized modular batteries that can be exchanged for a fully charged one at a gas station. Kind of like propane tanks. I'm aware that they are heavy, but we're talking about gas stations, heavy equipment is no sweat for the ones with autoshops. Having the option to swap out for longer distances, in emergencies, or even because we all know batteries degrade over time and not having our car tied to just one would ease a lot of my concerns. It also provides a means of easily addressing safety issues with lithium ion batteries, which can explode when they aren't in great shape or improperly charged, by easily rotating damaged ones out of service. All of this using existing infrastructure and giving gas stations a role to play, even if it is less frequent than filling up.

I'm sure this idea is impossible for a thousand reasons, but it's fun to think about.

 

Not necessarily impossible.  

 

The video below is a one-off demo and raises obvious questions about infrastructure and cost, but Tesla's vehicles are designed to allow battery swapping as a possibility... someday.

 

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My wife and I already hoping to squeeze one of these into the budget a few years from now. Would be great for her commute to work for sure. Those drives to hills for photography would be a good time for one them as well. :) There's a charging station about a 1/2 mile from where we live and with Tesla being about an hour from here,I would imagine more are springing up now or in the near future. Cool. :) 

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Trust me, I am a speed junkie... I used to build and sell muscle cars as side projects. Got old being in Fairfax County and never being able to use that speed. Lingenfelter Corvettes are true speed but going 2 mph in bumper-to-bumper got old real quick with a strong dual-friction clutch.

 

Glad you enjoy it, just not my cup of tea. Could buy a Prius for a lot less and still save on gas. Probably about a $75,000 difference.

 

Normally I wasn't buying a Mustang Cobra so save on gas but I can understand the benefits.

You can't buy a Prius for what the model 3 costs. The model 3 Tesler costs $35000 and that's before a $10,000 worth of write off on Federal Taxes. There are states which also will rebate costs, but that's inconsistent.. So the model 3 is about a $25k car... maybe less depending on your state's incentive package.

I just drove (test drove) a Model S a week or so ago. I drove the medium one.. 0-60 in about 4.5 seconds. I was on the beltway in it, and stomped on the gas, and it put me in the back of my seat. There is no comparison between that S model and my BMW 330e I currently drive. the S was just an impressive as hell car.

I had one concern... I typically commute about 170 miles a day, which makes the auto drive feature really attractive to me..... That's two ways all in. If I'm charging the battery every day given it's 200-300 range depending on the package... I'm going to go through the 1000 charge cycles pretty quickly on that car.. 1000 charge cycles seems to be fairly limiting.. Now I do realize I can swap out the batteries for 30-50$ at the rapid charging station and that might fix this. Still sounds like a big hole in their business plan. Also read that about swapping out the batteries in Musk's book, haven't read it anywhere else yet.

I was really excited about was that auto driving feature in the S. It was pretty cool. Any word if that made it into the 3? And how much is it with that feature? It's not like self driving, it's more like a smart cruise control which includes steering. I set that thing to 40 on a stretch of road.. It picked up with the speed limit changed and told me the spread limit was now 35, only it won't change your speed for you.... Car pulls in front of me.. it slowed down for that, no problem, settled to a safe driving distance back. When the car in front of me turned off, the car accelerated back to my set desired speed.

One time I was going through an intersection and the car in front of me changed lanes. My care changed lanes too automatically to continue to follow the care in front. That was cool. The dealer attendant told me the car looks for the lines on the side of the road. If it can't find the lines it will follow the car in front as a default. So if their were lines and the car in front changed lanes, it would have treated that differently.. which I later saw it did.

Anyway, very cool very exciting. Test driving test things was fun... scheduled it about a week ahead of time. The car is a fun car to drive with a lot of pep. I drive a sports car and this care was super fast in comparison; and I wasn't driving the high end one either.

Edited by JMS
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I wonder why no one has tried to design standardized modular batteries that can be exchanged for a fully charged one at a gas station. 

 

they are still trying to settle on a battery type/composition, as well as different needs on different vehicles.

 

it has and is being looked at,but many questions must be answered first.

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My wife and I already hoping to squeeze one of these into the budget a few years from now. Would be great for her commute to work for sure. Those drives to hills for photography would be a good time for one them as well. :) There's a charging station about a 1/2 mile from where we live and with Tesla being about an hour from here,I would imagine more are springing up now or in the near future. Cool. :)

The "charging stations" are actually "rapid charging stations"... The car will take about 4 hours to charge from dead to full charge plugged into your home. It will take 20-30 minutes to achieve that charge at a rapid charging station. Or you have the option to swap out the batteries which takes about 2 minutes but costs about the cost of a tank of gasoline.. 30-40$ if you don't want to hang around for 20 minutes.

You can hit a button in the car and it shows you a map with all the rapid charging stations. We had only 3 here in the DC area. I regularly drive from DC to Boston, and was interested in seeing they had the infrastructure to make that trip pretty easily in 200-300 mile hops.

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You can't buy a Prius for what the model 3 costs. The model 3 Tesler costs $35000 and that's before a $10,000 worth of write off on Federal Taxes. There are states which also will rebate costs, but that's inconsistent.. So the model 3 is about a $25k car... maybe less depending on your state's incentive package.

 

a Prius runs about 24K with it's own rebates ect

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I wonder why no one has tried to design standardized modular batteries that can be exchanged for a fully charged one at a gas station.

I read they have that for the models S and X. Musk has built a series of rapid charging stations across the country. At the automated charging stations one option if you don't want to wait for the charge is to swap out the batteries which takes 2-4 minutes. We have 3 of those rapid charging stations in the DC area. Eyeballing the map in the car there appeared to be about 20-30 of them between DC and Boston.

So you charge your car every night at home and get about 200-320 miles per charge depending upon what package you own, each car has different packages. Home charge takes 4 hours for the 300 mile charge if the car is completely dead, less if not completely dead. If you are driving on a trip.. like me between DC and Boston... then you rely on the rapid charging stations.. Takes 1 hour to completely charge your batteries at a rapid charging station.. free of charge. If you don't want to wait, you can pay about the cost of a tank of gas and swap out your batteries. That too is an automated process and takes 2-4 minutes.

Here is a map of all the rapid charging stations they've got.. Their are a lot of them.. and the making system of each car will tell you which is closest to you and allow you to schedule it and such...

https://www.teslamotors.com/findus#/bounds/49.38,-66.94,25.82,-124.39?search=supercharger,&name=usa

Edited by JMS
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I wonder why no one has tried to design standardized modular batteries that can be exchanged for a fully charged one at a gas station. Kind of like propane tanks. I'm aware that they are heavy, but we're talking about gas stations, heavy equipment is no sweat for the ones with autoshops. Having the option to swap out for longer distances, in emergencies, or even because we all know batteries degrade over time and not having our car tied to just one would ease a lot of my concerns. It also provides a means of easily addressing safety issues with lithium ion batteries, which can explode when they aren't in great shape or improperly charged, by easily rotating damaged ones out of service. All of this using existing infrastructure and giving gas stations a role to play, even if it is less frequent than filling up.

I'm sure this idea is impossible for a thousand reasons, but it's fun to think about.

It's an excellent reasoning.

For this to work, on a large scale basis, we need the gas stations and other aftermarket on board.

Right now, Tesla is going the Apple route in that it's all done in house. That is a business model that will only work for a niche.

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