Dan T.

Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired

Recommended Posts

Trying to decipher this legitimately gave me a headache.

I think he's comparing anger at the Flint Water Crisis to anger or lack of anger over abortion.

(but I'm not certain)

Edited by visionary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh, why bother? Even if you do succeed in figuring him out, you don't get anything worthwhile out of the exercise.

 

 
...Investigators found the accused officers had affected drug deals both inside and outside prison walls — including large quantities of cocaine and crystal meth — by exploiting the supposed impunity of their position in law enforcement. According to WJCL, the indictments state officers “agreed to wear their uniforms during the drug transports to deter law enforcement interference.”...

 

 

No harm done to the community. It's just good ole professional courtesy AKA police impunity.
 

 

 

Former Pepper Pike officer accused of using police database to stalk rape victim

PEPPER PIKE, Ohio -- A Former Pepper Pike police officer faces charges of rape, sexual battery, menacing by stalking and misusing a police database, according to an indictment announced this week. Jeffrey L. Martin, 55, used the Ohio Law Enforcement Gateway to gather information that allowed him to stalk the rape victim, the indictment said.

Martin was first arrested Dec. 14. Charges filed in Bedford Municipal Court say he also followed the rape victim several times. He used a firearm during the rape, the indictment said, but it is unclear how.

Martin followed the victim several times, including to the Bedford Police Department when she reported the rape, court records said. He is also accused of claiming to be a private investigator in an attempt follow the woman onto the Ursuline College campus, records said.

The Pepper Pike Police Department suspended him four times during his tenure,according to his personnel file... 

 

Still waiting on someone to credibly explain away why the police are more likely to be rapists.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://bnonews.com/news/index.php/news/id3637

LAPD officers James Nichols and Luis Valenzuela charged with raping women

 

James Nichols, 44, and Luis Valenzuela, 43, are alleged to have carried out their series of assaults between December 2008 and March 2011 while they worked as partners. The sexual assaults are alleged to have been carried out in various locations, including in their police vehicle.

 

According to prosecutors, the sexual assaults targeted four women aged 19, 24, 25 and 34 after they were arrested by the officers for narcotics-related offenses. Most of the sexual assaults were carried out while the officers were on duty, according to the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office.

 

Nichols and Valenzuela have been charged with multiple counts each of sexual assaults, including forcible rape, rape under color of authority, oral copulation under color of authority and oral copulation by force. In addition, Valenzuela has been charged with one count of assault with a firearm for allegedly pointing a gun at one of the victims.

Edited by visionary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More rapists with a badge. At least we don't get the "respect the badge" crowd trying to defend even this.

I wouldn't be surprised if there are a few of them right now thinking, "Well, it is a stressful job and..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh, why bother? Even if you do succeed in figuring him out, you don't get anything worthwhile out of the exercise.

 

 

No harm done to the community. It's just good ole professional courtesy AKA police impunity.
 

 

Still waiting on someone to credibly explain away why the police are more likely to be rapists.  

 

i think the position selfselects people that want to abuse power... no doubt.  Which would mean that there would be a statistically significant increase in the percentage of the police population that are rapists, compared to the general population.... which is a HUGE difference from saying cops are rapists.  

 

Which is what your post seems to say. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think the position selfselects people that want to abuse power... no doubt.  Which would mean that there would be a statistically significant increase in the percentage of the police population that are rapists, compared to the general population.... which is a HUGE difference from saying cops are rapists.  

 

Which is what your post seems to say. 

I hear you but if you think about it, the end result is the same. That is to say, not all cops are rapists but rapists prefer to be cops. It makes stalking easier, decreases the chances of getting caught and when you are caught, it decreases the sentence. Ditto for spouse abusers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think the position selfselects people that want to abuse power... no doubt.  Which would mean that there would be a statistically significant increase in the percentage of the police population that are rapists, compared to the general population.... which is a HUGE difference from saying cops are rapists.  

 

Which is what your post seems to say. 

 

But saying cops are rapists fits the preferred narrative.

Edited by tshile

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may also be something about putting on the badge that makes people act in ways they wouldn't ordinarily. For example, consider the Stanford prison experiment, which showed that merely being named a prison guard had profound psychological effects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may also be something about putting on the badge that makes people act in ways they wouldn't ordinarily. For example, consider the Stanford prison experiment, which showed that merely being named a prison guard had profound psychological effects.

I was actually just thinking about that experiment too. Apparently once put in a position of such power over others, many of the (ostensibly) normal people in that experiment became borderline sadistic and abusive towards the ones who were playing the "prisoner" roles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you see it in other roles too. when given any sort of power the worst comes out in some people.

 

you see it in IT in people snooping in places they don't belong. in the NSA/CIA (I forget which one it was) we had the report of analysts (a lot of them) abusing their access to the digital information their spying programs collected, using it to spy on girl friends, x wives, family/friends.

 

people suck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But saying cops are rapists fits the preferred narrative.

Your attempt to accuse somebody of saying "cops are rapists", to spin a narrative, might have worked better if someone had actually said "cops are rapists".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may also be something about putting on the badge that makes people act in ways they wouldn't ordinarily. For example, consider the Stanford prison experiment, which showed that merely being named a prison guard had profound psychological effects.

Granted, I'm doing a whole lot of assuming, from a long ways off. But I wonder if their training might well reinforce such tendencies, too.

Disclaimer: my total knowledge of police officer training comes from the fact that I once worked with a woman whose husband was going through training to be a Chesapeake police officer. In the 80s.

But an awful lot of the things she described seemed like very powerful team building exercises. In many ways similar to military basic training. And a big part of such training seems focused on creating the notion that anybody who puts on that uniform is superior to everybody who doesn't.

Now, I can certainly see why it is actually NECESSARY to ingrain that attitude into people, so they can do that job. They actually have to believe that they an handle things that lesser mortals can't. Further, they have to be absolutely certain that, with one word into the radio, their whole "gang" will be there, to win whatever conflict might happen.

If they don't believe those things, deep inside, then can they do the job?

But that type of attitude can also lead to an "us vs them" worldview, for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear you but if you think about it, the end result is the same. That is to say, not all cops are rapists but rapists prefer to be cops. It makes stalking easier, decreases the chances of getting caught and when you are caught, it decreases the sentence. Ditto for spouse abusers.

 

but the thing is, we are identifying a fundamental factor that make law enforcement challenging in all circumstances everywhere.  period.  not just in Louisiana, or in Mass, or in the FBI oppressing poor bird watchers in Oregon.... but everywhere.     It is why police forces are terrifying in places like Egypt and Nigeria with weak institutions and weak institutional control, and even in places like Mexico and South Africa that have relatively stronger institution/control/oversight.  

 

... one point that shouldn;t be missed is that <first> we NEED police.  There is no possible substitute for them, and without them we are all ****ed (because yes... it isn;t just police officers that potentially suck when they get their hands on power), and <second> for all the excesses that have been highlighted in this thread, the USA (and rich countries in general) do a surprisingly good job of actually succeeding in minimizing <or at least reducing> the inherent potential for abuse by law enforcement.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

this doesn;t mean that it shouldn;t always be refined, improved -- and we should CERTAINLY be worried about the possibility of backsliding to Bull Connor days, or even  not as bad as that... but we actually do a pretty good job of controlling for this inherent risk. 

Edited by mcsluggo
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... but we actually do a pretty good job of controlling for this inherent risk. 

 

I agreed with the majority of your post, but I do have to disagree here. Do you really think our country, as a whole, does a good job of controlling the risk of corruption among law enforcement when we have very obvious examples of it not being the case at all in LA, Chicago, Ferguson, Alabama, Baltimore, more towns than I'd like to name in Texas and NYC? 

 

What we have is a long standing tradition in law enforcement of marginalizing minorities and low income communities. It isn't "a bad apple here and there" for far too many departments, it's a way of life. Now that it has been brought to the forefront of discussion, that it is even discussed during presidential debates, it can no longer be dismissed or ignored when the technology is now in place to throw the cops word vs. the victim's word excuses out the window. 

 

Although we agree improvements need to be made, I believe we differ on how far we have to go to start seeing progress. Beginning to see progress would mean police departments aren't being forced to deal with their employees who are out of control. Beginning to see progress would mean a man who was fired from one police department for use of excessive force too many times, incompetence, or sexual assault, isn't immediately hired by another department in the same state, much less this country. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agreed with the majority of your post, but I do have to disagree here. Do you really think our country, as a whole, does a good job of controlling the risk of corruption among law enforcement when we have very obvious examples of it not being the case at all in LA, Chicago, Ferguson, Alabama, Baltimore, more towns than I'd like to name in Texas and NYC? 

 

What we have is a long standing tradition in law enforcement of marginalizing minorities and low income communities. It isn't "a bad apple here and there" for far too many departments, it's a way of life. Now that it has been brought to the forefront of discussion, that it is even discussed during presidential debates, it can no longer be dismissed or ignored when the technology is now in place to throw the cops word vs. the victim's word excuses out the window. 

 

Although we agree improvements need to be made, I believe we differ on how far we have to go to start seeing progress. Beginning to see progress would mean police departments aren't being forced to deal with their employees who are out of control. Beginning to see progress would mean a man who was fired from one police department for use of excessive force too many times, incompetence, or sexual assault, isn't immediately hired by another department in the same state, much less this country. 

 

i think we see the same thing.  

 

but i see a glass half full towards controlling and inherent risk, and you see a glass half empty... but its just semantics.... we both see where important improvements can, and need to, take place.

 

perhaps they will only take place if people are angry enough...?   i hope not.  

 

 

 

 

 

(anger forces reform, but it also tends to generate bad reform, that has to be fixed later ---- every reform, of any kind, that is named after a victim tends to suck ----  i suppose there is some optimum level of unrest, enough above complacency to generate change, enough below anger to allow for sensible measured reform)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Notice the "good cop" standing to the left of the one assaulting this kid....doing nothing to stop it. I wonder if she reported him? Good thing the officer is Black. Clearly having Black cops is the panacea many seem to think it is.(Click link for video and rest of article...since the site wouldn't let me embed it. :angry: )

Baltimore School Police Officer Seen Slapping Young Man In Video

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A shocking video recorded at a city school. Now the head of the Baltimore school police force is on administrative leave–and two of his officers reassigned–for what was caught on tape.

Ava-joye Burnett explains what happened.

The school system didn’t even know about the video until WJZ brought it to their attention. They are appalled at what they saw–an officer hitting and kicking a young man. Profanity laced and slap after slap–even a kick–video recorded at Reach Partnership High has people outraged.

“He’s lucky that wasn’t my little brother because I would be in jail right now. He had no right doing that,” said David Lucas.

WJZ has now learned the chief of Baltimore City school police, Marshall Goodwin, has been placed on administrative leave. Baltimore City schools says it didn’t even know about the video until WJZ called them asking for an explanation....

Edited by The Sisko

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'm willing to unilaterally state that 2 seconds of video that removes what happened before and after is ALWAYS a problem.   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why?

You know... To shoot, or not to shoot, that is the question. That one approach scene was interesting. Interesting in that you would let the person get that close, then go for a gun and not a taser.

The suspect that had a damn knife that was shot was ordered to drop it, then was not only shot, and incapacitated, but shot several more times, for good measure.

"To shoot or not to shoot" just continues to send the wrong message. Your gun isn't your only tool. And not only that, every scene shown pales in comparison to many of the high profile incidents that have been shown and/or documented.

And the one drill where the guy is coming from behind the car, that to me is the most difficult situation. But even if you make a judgment call, the dude had a freaking gun, and was walking toward you. You may get on paid leave, but that should be the end of it. It was you or him. But this just doesn't reflect the nature of most of the incidents THAT PEOPLE ARE PROTESTING.

Edited by Mr. Sinister
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.