No Excuses

The Brexit Thread

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The first thing I read when I wake up is this.....really....haha.

Nightmares for the rest of the weekend.

It'll only be a nightmare if he builds his government the way he builds hus mock drafts here :)

Still you would have free beers anytime as his first move.

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It'll only be a nightmare if he builds his government the way he builds hus mock drafts here :)

Still you would have free beers anytime as his first move.

 

 

And the finest wine known to humanity for the ladies! 

 

Because I'm cool like that.  :P.

 

Hail. 

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What the hell is Labour doing in the UK? If this isn't a golden opportunity to draw stark distinctions between themselves and those they oppose what is? And yet, where are they? Lost in a bitter internecine battle over who is ideologically pure enough.

Agreed, and whilst most like to target Farage and Johnson as the villains here, the situation isn't quite that clear cut. They deserve the stick they are getting, but they're aren't the main reason this unfolded the way it did. Johnson didn't even have the backing from within. They're are the easy soft targets.

It's been a selfish political power struggle across the board.

Corbyn said he supported remain and did **** all about it. The lost labour votes swung the decision in favour of leave.

And look know, the favourite for the Tory leader role is May, another remain supporter who did **** all to help Cameron.

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It pains me, genuinely pains me that we are even having discussions such as these on the 4th weekend here and the anniversary of the Somme. So much blood, so many tears, so much horror spilt out on the soil in hopes of a better tomorrow, the staggering price paid- and always in advance- so that we might heal as a species and grow into something better.

 

And then reality sets in again, the heavy boot on the neck as a Boris or a Donald uses those lofty ideals to wipe their ass with.

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http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/02/corbyn-keeps-watson-arms-length

 


Jeremy Corbyn’s aides are refusing to let Labour deputy leader Tom Watson hold a one-to-one meeting with him, claiming that Watson will try to “bully” the leader into resigning.

 

A senior Labour source, close to the embattled leader, said they had blocked Watson from talking privately to Corbyn because they have a “duty of care”. “They [Watson’s aides] want Watson to be on his own with Corbyn so that he can jab his finger at him,” the source said.

 

“We are not letting that happen. He’s a 70-year-old [sic] man. We have a duty of care … This is not a one-off. There is a culture of bullying. Maybe it’s a Blairite/Brownite thing.”

 

Really?

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Agincourt was over 600 years ago. Let it go.

 

Hastings was my thinking, but great finding as well lol

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Pretty amazing to see the seemingly inexorable creeping behemoth of bureaucracy overthrown. Proud of our cousins across the pond. They have chosen freedom and sovereignty over fear-mongering and race-baiting.

The U.K. will finally be able to negotiate their own trade agreements. They will no longer have unelected officials in Brussels forcing regulations down their throats that may make sense in Italy but none at all in the UK.

Couldn't agree more mate. Nigel Farage's speech followed by him saying "there's nothing on earth that would ever persuade to me vote for Hilary Clinton" completed the hat trick for me.

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http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/what-brexit-means-for-british-food?mbid=social_twitter

 

 

 

Now that the Leave campaign has won the referendum on Europe, it is clear that far more was at stake for British food in the E.U. than our right to misshapen fruit. Already, the president of the National Farmers’ Union, Meurig Raymond, has warned of food prices rising from the combination of a falling pound and the U.K.’s reliance on imported food. As a country that produces only around fifty-four per cent of what it eats, Britain starts to look vulnerable to fluctuating markets. For the first time since the Second World War, Britain’s ability to feed itself is in question. On June 24th, Tim Lang, a professor at City University and the leading U.K. food-policy expert, tweeted, despairingly, “EU shock. Very sad.” And then, “Food Plan B now needed. Will the people who voted Brexit be prepared to dig for Britain, work in picking fields and factories for low pay?”

 

One of the main reasons for establishing the E.U. in the first place—aside from peace—was to insure a plentiful food supply for entire populations. Sicco Mansholt was a Dutch farmer who became the E.U.’s first commissioner for agriculture, in 1958. Mansholt saw the union’s role as preventing any recurrence of famine, such as the terrible “Hunger Winter” suffered by the Netherlands in 1944 and 1945. Mansholt’s dream was for Europe to become as self-sufficient as possible in food.

 

 

 

In April, Lang co-authored—with Victoria Schoen—a “briefing paper” on the far-reaching impact of Brexit on British food. It is a sobering read. Lang and Schoen point out that, as of 2015, twenty-seven per cent of all food eaten in the U.K. (by value) was imported from the E.U. (compared with just four per cent from North America and four per cent from Africa). When it comes to fruits and vegetables, Britain is dependent on the E.U. for forty per cent of fresh produce. Lang sees this as a question of health as much as economics. Only thirty per cent of British adults currently eat the recommended five daily portions of fruits and vegetables, and only a tiny fraction of U.K. farmland is given over to horticulture—a hundred and sixty-four thousand hectares, out of 4.7 million hectares of crop-growing land. When the E.U. subsidies and tariff exemptions are gone, the odds are that plant foods will become more expensive, and that even fewer Brits will consume enough of them.

 

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The UK gets another Fourth of July kick in the balls. Farage quits on them after being a driving force behind Brexit.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-

Now when this blows up in the face of his "party" he can claim it wasn't his fault. That it would have worked if he was running things.

 

Best part of this with Farage is that he quits UKIP, but he remains an European Deputee...

 

That guy definately have no morale nor honor.

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You know - it's funny this announcement should be made on July 4th - the U.S' actual independence day.

 

I supposse one could draw some parallels between Mr. Farage's campaign to leave the EU and ours to leave Great Britain 240 years ago, but now that the Brexit campaign's two more visible leaders have steered clear of taking the reigns of the UK's transition away from the European Union, it seems there's at least one place where the two paths go in different directions: our most prominent advocates for independence stayed.

 

They signed their names on a document, a document that was approved on this day in 1776, that doubled as an arrest warrant if the revolution was unsuccessful. Many of them already had long, exhausting careers in public service. Yet, they stayed. They stayed to see this new nation out. They stayed at the expense of their reputations, their friendships, and their health.

Now, don't mistake this as over-romanticism of our founders. These were men - flawed, divided, egotistic, morally ambiguous (and, perhaps, from certain points of view - bankrupt) men whose case for independence, by and large, didn't focus primarily on the common American colonial.

 

But they stayed to see this revolution out, during the war and after the war's end. They took responsibility for this new nation in which the stakes were as high as one could imagine. It doesn't seem like Mr. Farage or Mr. Johnson can say the same.

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John Oliver got it spot in just before the vote:

One of the best things to come out of Britain in a long time. (that's intended as a compliment)

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One of the best things to come out of Britain in a long time. (that's intended as a compliment)

 

 

Being as both his parents are from the great City of L'pool, it's not hard to see where he get's his cutting, no B/S sense of humour from.  :D.

 

He was great on 'Mock the Week' on the BBC before hitting it big Stateside. An improv. stand-up based off topical news items thrown at them. Funny show. 

 

Hail. 

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Being as both his parents are from the great City of L'pool, it's not hard to see where he get's his cutting, no B/S sense of humour from. :D.

He was great on 'Mock the Week' on the BBC before hitting it big Stateside. An improv. stand-up based off topical news items thrown at them. Funny show.

Hail.

What I like most about his show is the information he imparts and the passion he delivers. The humor is a great addition, but it's more the cherry on top for me. Oh, and I love the use of HBO's money for the "screw you" stunts.

Sorry, off topic a bit... though I recommend him to everyone (YouTube has the show divided up for those without HBO).

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I just realized this whole Brexit thing is working out just like the episode of South Park where Cartman does the morning announcements.

 

David Cameron : Wendy Testaburger

Nigel Farage : Eric Cartman

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Agreed, and whilst most like to target Farage and Johnson as the villains here, the situation isn't quite that clear cut. They deserve the stick they are getting, but they're aren't the main reason this unfolded the way it did. Johnson didn't even have the backing from within. They're are the easy soft targets.

It's been a selfish political power struggle across the board.

To quote myself from a couple of days back, blame Farage and Johnson all you like but those two haven't lasted five minutes after the votes have been counted.

The people who will profit most will be those who remained silent during the fight. Quite a few people out there have played the long game to fall into positions of power after the event.

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http://www.cnbc.com/2016/07/06/british-pound-sterling-plunges-as-brexit-fears-continue-to-swirl.html?_source=twitter

British pound sterling plunges as Brexit fears continue to swirl

 

The British pound plunged to fresh 31-year lows on Wednesday, swamped by continued fears over the U.K. leadership vacuum and the country's potential exit from the European Union (EU).

 

The pound tumbled as low as $1.2796 during Asia trade on Wednesday, it's lowest since 1985, after ending Tuesday's trade around $1.2960. The U.K. currency later recovered to trade around $1.2881 at 12:27 p.m. SIN/HK.

 

Analysts were concerned that the continued political uncertainty will hurt capital inflows and spur companies to delay investments, potentially tipping the economy into a recession.

 

The Bank of England (BOE) had begun taking preemptive steps to protect the British economy in the wake of June 23 U.K. referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU).

 

On Tuesday, BOE Governor Mark Carney sent a clear message to Britain's cautious bankers: They needed to start lending more money. The central bank cut the amount of capital it required banks to hold in reserve, which freed up an extra 150 billion pounds ($196 billion) for lending.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36704783?ocid=socialflow_twitter

Brexit vote: Romanians anxious about future in UK

 

The UK's vote to leave the European Union has stunned most Romanians who live here, sowing confusion and doubt in a community that has grown dramatically since the country's accession to the EU in 2007.

 

Levels of anxiety in the community were heightened by headlines in Romania itself such as: "All Romanians to be kicked out of Britain after the referendum".

 

Many have felt increasingly vulnerable and disorientated, although the surge of xenophobic abuse directed at Poles has not been reported by Romanians.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/06/business/international/welsh-reject-eu-but-its-money-will-be-missed.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur

Welsh Reject E.U., but Its Money Will Be Missed

 

David Adams co-owns a painting business here. His leanings in the recent referendum to leave the European Union would seem obvious.

 

Grants from the European Union have funded many of the projects he works on, including the former bank branch he was painting last week in this city in southern Wales. European Union funds also helped him hire apprentices, including his own son. And Wales gets back far more money from the European Union than it pays in.

 

But many of the poorer places in Britain that receive the most aid from Europe also voted decisively to leave. Promises were made by the leaders of the so-called Leave campaign that exiting the European Union would lead to a bonanza of money no longer being sent to Brussels, the seat of the European government. After the vote, they almost immediately retreated from those promises, leaving the future of aid programs funded by Europe in peril.

 

Even some in Newport who knew what they stood to lose were conflicted over the vote.

 

“We get more back than we put in,” said Mr. Adams, 52, leaning against his van in spattered white work pants. “What the money has done is made the infrastructure of Wales much better, everywhere’s much more accessible because of the road infrastructure, things like that. That’s where all the E.U. money’s gone.”

Edited by visionary

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http://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-petition-idUSKCN0ZP0D4

British government rejects petition calling for second EU referendum

 

The British government has rejected an online petition signed by 4.1 million people calling for a new referendum on whether to leave the European Union.

 

Britons voted by 52 to 48 percent, or 17.4 million votes to 16.1 million, to leave the EU in a June 23 referendum, a result which most politicians have said should be respected but which some who voted "remain" are struggling to accept.

 

The petition called for the government to enact a rule that there should be another referendum if the vote for "remain" or "leave" was less than 60 percent based on a turnout of less than 75 percent.

 

The Foreign Office, the ministry that had steered through parliament the EU Referendum Act setting out the rules, responded that the legislation did not set a threshold for the result or for minimum turnout.

 

"The Prime Minister and Government have been clear that this was a once in a generation vote and, as the Prime Minister has said, the decision must be respected," it said.

 

"We must now prepare for the process to exit the EU and the Government is committed to ensuring the best possible outcome for the British people in the negotiations."

 

Both candidates to replace David Cameron as leader of the ruling Conservative Party and prime minister have said the result of the referendum should not be questioned and Brexit should be delivered.

 

"Brexit means Brexit," front-runner Theresa May, the interior minister, said in a speech announcing her bid. May had advocated staying in the bloc, but was not a leading figure in the "remain" campaign.

 

Her rival, junior energy minister Andrea Leadsom, was one of the most passionate advocates of Brexit ahead of the referendum and has said that Britain would flourish outside the EU.

 

 

 

https://twitter.com/AFP/status/751751485374029825

BREAKING Angela Eagle confirms she will challenge Jeremy Corbyn for leadership of the British Labour Party
8:14 AM
Edited by visionary

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http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-10/corbyn-defiant-as-party-cracks-joining-tories-in-u-k-disarray

After ‘Brexit’ Vote, Immigrants Feel a Town Turn Against Them

 

A few days after Britain voted to leave the European Union, Monika Baginski was in a supermarket, chatting with a friend on the phone in her native Polish, when a man followed her down the aisle. “You foreigner,” Ms. Baginski recalled him saying. “You’ll be out soon.”

 

Ms. Baginski, 32, said she was stunned. Until that moment, she had never been the target of abuse, even in Boston, a port town on the east coast of England where rancor between longtime residents and the fast-growing population of recent immigrants has been simmering for years.

 

But since Britain’s referendum vote to leave the European Union, latent hostility toward the new arrivals — most of whom came to Boston from Central and Eastern Europe under rules that let European Union citizens live and work anywhere in the bloc — has burst into the open, many immigrants say. Many in the Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish and Romanian communities in the area are anxiously considering whether they should stay in Britain, or whether they even want to.

 

“Something is broken in this town,” said Paul Gleeson, a Labour Party councilor in Boston, where 76 percent of voters supported leaving the European Union, the highest pro-“Brexit” proportion in the country. “This veneer of propriety has suddenly disappeared.’’

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-10/corbyn-defiant-as-party-cracks-joining-tories-in-u-k-disarray

Corbyn Confronts Dissent as U.K. Political Chaos Deepens

 

Jeremy Corbyn said he’ll confront a challenge to his U.K. Labour Party leadership head on as the fallout from the vote to leave the European Union sparks a splintering of his opposition group.

 

Corbyn, 67, has been battered since the watershed June 23 referendum. Dozens of his front-bench team have quit, he lost a no-confidence vote by a 172-40 margin and party elders have called for him to go. He faces a formal challenge on Monday when his former business spokeswoman, Angela Eagle, says she’ll announce a leadership bid.

 

“You would be surprised how much support there is out there from people who feel that I was elected a year ago with a very large majority and a very large mandate,” Corbyn said in an interview on the BBC’s “Andrew Marr Show” on Sunday. “We’re a party that’s going places and doing very well actually.”

 

Corbyn’s defiant tone sets the stage for more turbulence in U.K. politics. As infighting grips the country’s two biggest parties, investors, executives and the EU’s other 27 nations are waiting for the U.K. to spell out the mechanics of how it plans to leave the trading bloc. The pound has plunged to the lowest against the U.S. dollar in three decades.

 

Eagle, who said Corbyn has lost the confidence of his own party, set out her pitch for the leadership in an interview with Robert Peston on ITV.

 

“The country has now got huge challenges,” Eagle said. “It’s threatening our economy and it’s hurting people. We could have a very quick general election and I believe I’m the right person to lead the party into that election.”

Edited by visionary

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