BenningRoadSkin

NY Times: Miscarrying at Work - The Physical Toll of Pregnancy Discrimination

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, thegreaterbuzzette said:
em·pa·thy
/ˈempəTHē/
noun
 
  1. the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.
     
    I believe I have more then explained that I have empathy for others. There's a difference between what I believe is the root cause of an issue and how I would treat someone in the situation that needed help. When you are presented a problem and expected to come up with a solution, the process to do so - and the outcome may be very ugly. In no way represents how someone with that problem should be treated. 

    I was diagnosing & hypothesis a cure, not providing care. Very different philosophies. 
     
     

 

You didn't help yourself with your attack on our entire generation.  Think most of us want to do the right thing, but disagree on what the right thing is.  Regardless of intent, how a policy is implemented directly effects how they are treated.  It effects how people perceive others based on the lines we draw in the sand with our laws. Eventually anyways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Renegade7 said:

 

You didn't help yourself with your attack on our entire generation.  Think most of us want to do the right thing, but disagree on what the right thing is.  Regardless of intent, how a policy is implemented directly effects how they are treated.  It effects how people perceive others based on the lines we draw in the sand with our laws. Eventually anyways.

 

I'm not sure if you are reading my posts with a very skewed mindset or what....I just went back to look at my posts referencing Millennials :

 

"Why are millennial incredibly strained financially? 

I'm a millennial.

What makes millennial so special that they can't be financially set too?"

 

Those were legitimate questions, as I don't like when people try to say this generation is so handicapped and incapable. That opinion is out of empowerment, not derogatory. I think any generation has items you can point to about how they were harder or easier. 

 

all other posts mentioned Millennial, because it was reply or referencing someone elses' comment. Not to single them out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, thegreaterbuzzette said:

 

I'm not sure if you are reading my posts with a very skewed mindset or what....I just went back to look at my posts referencing Millennials :

 

"Why are millennial incredibly strained financially? 

I'm a millennial.

What makes millennial so special that they can't be financially set too?"

 

Those were legitimate questions, as I don't like when people try to say this generation is so handicapped and incapable. That opinion is out of empowerment, not derogatory. I think any generation has items you can point to about how they were harder or easier. 

 

all other posts mentioned Millennial, because it was reply or referencing someone elses' comment. Not to single them out. 

 

Hmm... think you should go to the next page then

 

Quote

Give me 100 Millenials who "cant afford life" I bet you at least 90% of them made repeated bad financial choices to get there. 

 

You were wrong for that, but we already had that convo, we don't need to have it again.

 

I'm convinced you're good people and we're not going to agree on everything, neither is a bad thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most millennials entered the job market or began college during the 2007 financial crisis. The wage depression and debt burden that came from it will have a lasting impact for a long time.

 

It is absolutely infuriating reading posts  promoting anecdotal junk.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, PleaseBlitz said:

 

Wow, I can't even with this.  Are you really saying that men go through the same thing as women when birthing a kid?  What.  The.  ****.  

 

No... I have two, I’m quite aware of the differences. 

 

Despite my posts about understanding the burden people starting families puts on an employer, I think it’s a shame our society makes being a working mother so difficult.  I could go on for paragraphs but pretty much everyone here knows what I’d say. 

 

Along with that I think society has completely neglected the role of the father. I’m assuming that’s mainly because our society comes from a long history of the father only working and the mother doing the “motherly” things. 

 

We know the father being involved is important but the idea of paternity leave is not really a thing outside of a portion of our workforce. And I’m guessing but I bet there’s some correlation between industries and what they offer. I bet a construction worker doesn’t get any paternity leave. 

 

I don’t know how everyone else was but I basically do everything while my wife tends to nursing and healing. I could have used 3 or 4 weeks of leave. *She* could have used me getting 3 or 4 weeks of leave. 

 

The doctors appointments alone you have to have to go for the first two months for the child and the mother are just nonstop. We had minor difficulties and I shuffled my family to specialists seemingly every day 40+ minutes away in loudoun and fairfax. I can’t imagine having serious issues. 

 

I recall reading an article about some place in Europe where people get a year off with a new born.  Not for healing but because they believe it’s that important to the family structure and well being of their society. 

 

I agree with them. 

 

(Hopefully I didn’t just make that up...)

Edited by tshile
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, No Excuses said:

Most millennials entered the job market or began college during the 2007 financial crisis. The wage depression and debt burden that came from it will have a lasting impact for a long time.

 

It is absolutely infuriating reading posts  promoting anecdotal junk.

 

I'm confused at if your reference is saying the article was anecdotal junk or those of us posting our experiences are anecdotal junk? In all honesty both are really. 

I graduated college in 2008, right smack dab in the thick of it. My first post-college job paid a whooping $12 an hour even though it required a secret security clearance. I get it. I then moved to Guam as my husband was military. Took 3 months til I finally got a job paying $8/hr with guarantee of 0 hours a week and no benefits or paid leave. But I knew I had to start somewhere every time I relocated. 

I get my anecdotal experience isn't everyone's. But I've also seen so many that started at min wage, with a few years of solid work ethic climb the ladder quite quickly. It happens a lot. It may not for everyone, but by reaching out to the right resources, it can be attainable. 

If anyone is reading this, and wants help on how to attain their goals - I'm happy to help!

5 minutes ago, tshile said:

(Hopefully I didn’t just make that up...)

You didn't. But their taxes are INSANE. And if the majority of US population is for their taxes being 70%, then as a democratic republic, let's do it. Unfortunately I don't think people would be on board with that. Those other countries, that has ALWAYS been their norm, so there's no change curve to compete with. 

Edited by thegreaterbuzzette

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, thegreaterbuzzette said:

 

You didn't. But their takes are INSANE. And if the majority of US population is for their taxes being 70%, then as a democratic republic, let's do it. Unfortunately I don't think people would be on board with that. Those other countries, that has ALWAYS been their norm, so there's no change curve to compete with. 

 

I get your point about getting support, but I’m general I’m for taxes so long as we’re getting something for it. 

 

I will happily pay higher taxes if means my kids are getting a better shot at having a healthier life (and by extension, other’s kids)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, tshile said:

 

I get your point about getting support, but I’m general I’m for taxes so long as we’re getting something for it. 

 

I will happily pay higher taxes if means my kids are getting a better shot at having a healthier life (and by extension, other’s kids)

We agree on that! I always shudder when I hear "lets lower taxes!" from politicians (I know, confusing with my political party choice)

Same reason even though I choose not to have kids, I always vote in favor of items that increase public education. It makes a better society and a better life for me! I could start an entire thread on how education shouldn't be tied to property taxes alone. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

I guess we both read that differently.  I took it more as an explanation as to why employees don't pay attention to the info provided then a statement that liberals need to stop making new laws.  I see where you got that though.  I'll let @thegreaterbuzzette explain her intention with that post.

 

The logic here isn't hard:

 

1.  Bad things happen at work to people because they don't know their rights.

2.  They don't their rights because they ignore the notices they get because they get too many notices.

3.  They get too many notices because liberals keep passing laws that require employers to keep putting out notices.

 

I'm going the other way.  The problem is that they don't have enough (easy) access to the information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, PeterMP said:

I'm going the other way.  The problem is that they don't have enough (easy) access to the information

Perhaps you missed the link I posted.  The info is there.  Just gotta look for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously, all millennial are not the same, but there is no doubt that the ones that (tried) entered the job market during the great recession were dealt an economic blow they will never really recover from..

 

Even the Fed's research agrees:

 

https://www.pymnts.com/debt/2018/millennials-recovery-great-recession-federal-reserve/

 

 

3 minutes ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

Perhaps you missed the link I posted.  The info is there.  Just gotta look for it.

 

Did you miss the word easy?

 

Most employer handbooks are not accessible online through google.

Edited by PeterMP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, PeterMP said:

Did you miss the word easy?

Like I posted earlier, I found all the info needed on a random states laws and how to address grievances in less than 5 minutes.  I've met hookers that weren't that easy.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

Like I posted earlier, I found all the info needed on a random states laws and how to address grievances in less than 5 minutes.  I've met hookers that weren't that easy.  

 

1.  Did the women in the story have an actual legal grievance under NV law?

 

Please render your legal opinion.

 

2.  Like I posted earlier, if it isn't working, it is a failure.  You can excuse the failure or do something else/more.

 

Considering we're talking about dead babies here, I'll side on the do something else/more side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, PeterMP said:

 

1.  Did the women in the story have an actual legal grievance under NV law?

 

Please render your legal opinion.

 

2.  Like I posted earlier, if it isn't working, it is a failure.  You can excuse the failure or do something else/more.

 

Considering we're talking about dead babies here, I'll side on the do something else/more side.

Is a miscarriage a dead baby?  Interesting position for a liberal.

 

I'd have to research more to form my own legal opinion and it's late.  I don't believe I am excusing the failure.  I'm just not putting all the blame in the same place as you 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

Is a miscarriage a dead baby?  Interesting position for a liberal.

 

I'd have to research more to form my own legal opinion and it's late.  I don't believe I am excusing the failure.  I'm just not putting all the blame in the same place as you 

 

I'm only a liberal in a world where there is no real conservative political party.  The Republican party is not the conservative Republican party of my father.

 

Today we just have liberal and stupid.

Edited by PeterMP
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JSSkinz said:

From what I just read ITT's annual cost is $45,000 - $85,000 per year?  That's as much as it cost to attend Harvard, what about that school would make you sign up for that?

 

 

I explored them when I was in the middle of my BS. Decided not to. I’m hindsight I’m obviously glad, but the truth is they were appealing. 

 

When youre working two jobs, with no satisfying career prospects, trying to start a family, and driving 40 minutes to take classes all night... doing everything online at your own pace is quite enticing. The cost becomes justifiable to you (even if it wouldn’t if you were level headed and felt you had options)

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, No Excuses said:

Most millennials entered the job market or began college during the 2007 financial crisis. The wage depression and debt burden that came from it will have a lasting impact for a long time.

 

It is absolutely infuriating reading posts  promoting anecdotal junk.

 

Last thing I read (and I don’t think it’s changed) was that a house was the biggest and best investment vehicle for majority of people (makes sense, most people don’t take out loans that big for anything else)

 

my generation lost years on that investment. My friends, early millennials, lost a good 10 years on that. They’re looking for their first house in their mid 30’s. 

 

Right when housing was at the best time to jump in, they had no means to do it. Worse, the further you get away from being the field you just borrowed a ton of money to get an education in because there’s no jobs, the less desirable you become to the employers. I know plenty of people with careers they never wanted or got a degree in because that’s the only jobs they could get out of school. 

 

Those opportunities are lost forever.

 

This should be preface to conversations discussing the millennials but it’s rarely even recognized anywhere in the conversation. 

Edited by tshile
  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@tshile it took me a few years to overcome my natural instinct to say "shut up and work harder" about millennials, but I agree with you 100%. There's really no way around the facts here - they had to deal with an environment that many of us didn't and that shouldn't be ignored. 

 

I lost a bunch on my second house when things blew up too. But, the flip side to that is that I was fortunate enough to buy my first house in 2003, so I made $50K per year for three years that I used as equity for my second house (which sadly I bought at the peak). So even though my house depreciated by over $100K, at least that was only eating into my equity and I was still "above water" so to speak. 

 

Point being...the recession hit everyone (I honestly thought when I bought that house for $650K in 2006 that I'd likely eventually sell it for $1M), but some of us had an opportunity to establish ourselves professional and financially to handle the hit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.