PeterMP

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About PeterMP

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    The Dirtbags
  • Birthday 07/11/1972

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  1. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Okay, you said they were being sold. "Because we constantly have depth problems and he trades them for veterans that either don't pan out or for cash." If he's trading them for cash, that's considered selling them, which isn't against NBA rules and isn't honestly that uncommon, but it has no upside in terms of competing. It isn't like they give you a break on your salary cap or an exemption based on the money you bring back from the sale. It is just straight cash going into the owners' pockets. Teams traded picks relatively often for what appear to be rentals. Milwaukee just traded a 1st round pick for George Hill. This off season they will cut George Hill (and pay him a a million dollars). Hill will play for them. He'll probably even be part of their playoff rotation, but they didn't trade a 1st round pick for hm. They traded the first round pick because Cleveland also took $20 million+ dollars of salaries off their books next year. Giving up a 1st round pick and paying George Hill a $1 million to go away at the end of the season is worth reducing their cap next year by $20+ million dollars. (With different motivations, the Sixers and Raptors have made pretty significant trades for guys that might turn into just rentals.) (I honestly think part of the problem here is that many Wizards fans don't have much context about what happens in the rest of the NBA. You're Wizards fans, but not NBA fans so some of the things that Ernie does that aren't actually that uncommon seem more egregious than they really are.) There's more to basketball than just how many points a player got. The starting lineup last year had a negative rating in the series against Toronto. Theirs has a positive rating. Two years ago against Boston, they were actually positive so that's a case where you might be able to argue a better bench would have helped. 4 years ago against Atlanta though, a negative rating for the 2 most common lineups, and theirs have a positive rating. Year before that against the Pacers negative rating for the Wizards most common lineup, but positive for the Pacers. Lots of teams have bad contracts. Like I said, Milwaukee just gave up a 1st round pick to get rid of 2. Indianapolis has $6+ million to Al Jefferson and Monta Ellis who aren't even in the NBA. (The Pacers have $2 million + for the next 4 years for Monta Ellis who hasn't played since spring of 2017.) Generally, if you want to consider who is the worse, you look at who has won the least (or lost the most). It is clear that the answer is Allen. By any reasonable quantitative measure Allen is worse.
  2. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Since Allen took over, the Redskins are 26th in wins. Since Ernie took over, the Wizards are 22nd in wins. Now, there are 2 more teams in the NFL than in the NBA, but in term of percentage of teams with more wins, there is a smaller percentage of NBA teams with more wins than the Wizards than NFL teams with more wins than the Redskins, and in terms of teams with fewer wins, there is a smaller percentage of teams with fewer wins below the Redskins than the Wizards. If you say Allen is a better GM than Ernie, then you are saying that even when comparing directly to the teams they are competing against that you don't care about winning games.
  3. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Okay, if he's selling 2nd round picks, that's almost certainly something that is coming from ownership. That's nothing more than a financial decision where that money goes right into the owners' pockets. From a basketball perspective, there is no upside to selling a 2nd round pick. Next, your problem is not your depth. During the playoffs rotations shorten anyway and benches are notoriously sketchy. Toronto appeared to have a great bench/depth last year, and they did nothing against the Cavs in the playoffs last year because Lebron essentially didn't leave the court and as good as their bench was they were no match for a dialed in and motivated Lebron. Your problem is the talent of your top 2 players. The Wall/Beal combination isn't as good as the other top combinations. Teams trade for soon to be free agents for 2 reasons: 1. They want their rights and plan on resigning them. 2. The trade was never about that player, but was about getting rid of salary or a player that was deemed a negative. And then they let them walk for one of two reasons: 1. Once they had the player in house, they decided the player was not what they wanted as a player/person. 2. They never really planned to hold onto that player. And the first thing can absolutely happen with 1st round picks so making the trade for a soon to be free agent doesn't really increase your risk of that. I don't want to go through ever Ernie transaction for you, but I suspect if you look at that move, you'll see one of those 2 things was true. But you are also selectively eliminating the cases where it works. Oubre was a trade where Ernie traded picks. He's now an important part of the rotation.
  4. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Why? It isn't like 2nd round picks routinely become valuable players. Multiple teams every year sell their 2nd round picks. Certainly, if trading 2nd round picks for other players, then selling them must be even more incompetent (but teams do it).
  5. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    You know why he made that trade. He made that trade because he had what was thought to be a really good team and there were no clear immediate difference makers at that point in the draft. He was looking for people that would make a different on what was thought of as a really good team. And Miller at the time was seen as a starter and not just a role player. Then they were gone in a few years because things fell apart (that season), and it didn't make sense to keep them while the Wizards were having to rebuild. The trade was generally well thought of at the time e.g.: http://www.espn.com/nba/draft2009/columns/story?columnist=ford_chad&page=DraftGrades-090626 WASHINGTON WIZARDS GRADE: A Analysis: Washington had the No. 5 pick in the draft but traded it, along with Etan Thomas, Darius Songaila and Oleksiy Pecherov, to the Wolves for Randy Foye and Mike Miller. The Wizards understood they were unlikely to get a player at No. 5 who could crack their rotation, and they wanted to be serious contenders right away in the East. I think the addition of Foye and Miller puts them there. The Wolves were willing to pay significantly more than any other team, giving up two solid starters. I don't think the Wizards could have done any better in getting value for the No. 5 pick. Because he said that they don't have a 2nd round pick for the next 4. They have a 2nd round pick in 3. Now, what Ernie does with it we'll see, but right now, the Wizards will have 2 picks in 3 years. Not 5. I'm not even a Wizards fan, and I know that.
  6. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Uh, hello? They just got the Cavs 2nd round in 2021 in the trade the other day. And they might get Atlanta's 2019 2nd round pick depending on where it falls, but probably not. It is true you only need a few player in the NBA to get better, but: 1. It is hard to be really bad in the NFL because of the parity in the NFL. 2. You can get good (and even great) players from more places (e.g. later in the draft). The net result is things balance out.
  7. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Nearly 25% seems pretty regularly to me. And the flip side of your point is that there almost certainly later round picks on good teams that don't start that would start for some not as good teams, and there's almost certainly people starting over better players because of contract and drafting positions. It works both ways. And it even happens at the level of great players. You can make the argument that the best player in the the last 40 years at the most important position in the NFL was taken in the 6th round. There's not a reasonable argument that a guy taken even in the 2nd half of the first round is one of the best players in the NBA in the last 40 years. The leagues are difference and your strategy for getting better has to be different. In the NBA, you need to value high first round picks differently than in the NFL. But that doesn't make it easier to get good in the NBA than the NFL. It makes it different.
  8. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Are you really suggesting that if Leonard would have gone to the Wizards at 6 the out come would have been the same as going 15th to San Antonio, where there wasn't pressure on start right away, the out come would have been the same? Leonard's considered a classic example of the development program of the Spurs. To suggest that he'd be the player that he became going to another team as a higher pick where there would have been pressure to play and perform right away is laughable. And oh, by the way you do realize that he forced his way out of San Antonio making San Antonio take much less than his true value back?
  9. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    You need more starters, but it is easier to get starters. There's a lot more guys starting and that even turn into good players in the NFL that are taken out of the first 2 rounds of the NFL draft then the NBA. And people keep forgetting Grunfeld didn't just build a team that was a regular playoff team once. He's done it twice.
  10. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    The flip side of that is the NFL teams regularly find starters in the 4th and 5th round of the draft. There isn't even a 3rd round of the NBA draft. Plenty of teams end up with high picks and end up no where.
  11. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Simplistically, Grunfeld has shown he can build a team that sustains winning for a period of years (he's done it twice). Allen hasn't. Which is why Grunfeld's teams have had more success in terms of making and even advancing in the playoffs. Allen's teams get lucky/fluky for a year, make the playoffs, and are right back to being mediocre or even bad the next year. Grunfeld might not understand how to actually build a champion, but Allen doesn't even understand how to build a team that's a playoff caliber team for a couple of years in a row. Even now, the Wizards are actually closer to being a real good team than the Redskins (with proper management and assuming equal luck).
  12. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    1. I'm not at all sure why it is easier to build a competitive team in the NBA than the NFL. It is certainly different, but at the end of the day you are competing against 32 vs. 30 teams. But the NFL is all about parity so it seems like that parity alone should get you close to competitive. 2. He was 34 years old, was struggling, never really was considered an upper echelon QB, and was signed to an awful contract. If he retires because of the injury, that might actually be a positive for Allen/Redskins. 3. And the Redskins aren't/haven't been? The Redskins have been one PR disaster after another. I also don't think the Wizards are really a laughing stock. It isn't like they've been Kings bad as long as the Kings, and this year, it isn't like they are the Rockets who talked about having championship aspirations and have fallen completely flat. Their struggling, and part of that's maybe because their top FA pickup and an expected starter has been injured. (not that I'm going to claim that Howard is the answer. I always though that was a pickup that could go either way and that they could be worse with him vs. Gortat.) That's not really been the case over Grunfeld's whole career, and there have certainly been years where winning the NFC East or making it as a wildcard in the NFC East have not been that big of an accomplishment.
  13. PeterMP

    Who is the worst general manager in D.C? (poll)

    Easily Allen. Redskins have made the playoffs 2 times in 8 years and never won a playoff game. (I'm counting this year as out of the playoffs). Grunfeld's teams have been in the playoffs 8 times in 14 years and won the first round a few times. Grunfeld's teams have been to the 2nd round of the playoffs at at higher percentage than Allen's have made the playoffs. They have nobody to play the most important position in the sport (and realistically all of the at least the major US professional sports) and have no way to get somebody that's actually going to be any good at it. The Redskins are almost certainly going to have to go backwards before they go forward again.
  14. PeterMP

    ***2018-19 NBA Season Thread***

    Steph Curry doesn't believe in the moon landing. https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2810107-stephen-curry-says-he-doesnt-believe-man-landed-on-the-moon?utm_source=cnn.com&utm_campaign=editorial&utm_medium=referral
  15. PeterMP

    The Official Washington Wizards Thread: The JOHN WALL ERA

    Who was Leonard accountable to last year when the Spurs said he was healthy to play and he refused to play? There are plenty of reports that the real problem was that Leonard didn't want to be in San Antonio because it was hurting his marketability. That's worse than anything that anybody on the Wizards team has done. Lebron dictated the Heat's number 1 pick in the draft to them, and left anyway. When Lebron was there, him and Wade ran the Heat. If you have premiere player and he's not buying in in the NBA, there's very little you can do. If that off season before the injury issue the Spurs would management decided that Leonard wasn't buying in and was listening to people that didn't have the Spurs or winning as their top interest (e.g. people saying he under rated because San Antonio was too small of market), trading him and bringing back comparable on the court talent would have been impossible. Nobody in the NBA is trading that kind of talent as there is a problem with it so you can't bring back equal talent unless there is a problem. If John Wall has been doing things in practices, games, and in the locker room Ernie isn't happy with, for most of his career, Ernie really couldn't do much because he couldn't trade John Wall and bring back a comparable player. As I've said, there have been issues with Whiteside's effort since he signed the max deal. What have the Heat done to hold him accountable? (And that's a case where they can't trade him because nobody wants that contract.)