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I want to sue the republican party for willful denial of scientific evidence about climate change.


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Carbon emissions to soar in 2021 by second highest rate in history

 

Carbon dioxide emissions are forecast to jump this year by the second biggest annual rise in history, as global economies pour stimulus cash into fossil fuels in the recovery from the Covid-19 recession.

 

The leap will be second only to the massive rebound 10 years ago after the financial crisis, and will put climate hopes out of reach unless governments act quickly, the International Energy Agency has warned.

 

Surging use of coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel, for electricity is largely driving the emissions rise, especially across Asia but also in the US. Coal’s rebound causes particular concern because it comes despite plunging prices for renewable energy, which is now cheaper than coal.

 

Speaking exclusively to the Guardian, Fatih Birol, the executive director of the IEA, and one of the world’s leading authorities on energy and climate, said: “This is shocking and very disturbing. On the one hand, governments today are saying climate change is their priority. But on the other hand, we are seeing the second biggest emissions rise in history. It is really disappointing.”

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

California program overestimates climate benefits of forest offsets - study

 

California's forest carbon offset program has generated tens of millions of credits that have questionable value in fighting climate change, a nonprofit group of scientists said this week.

 

CarbonPlan, a group that researches the integrity of programs designed to offset carbon emissions, said that 29% of the forest carbon offsets it analyzed in California's cap and trade program overestimated the amount of carbon emissions they were offsetting, totaling 30 million tonnes, worth about $410 million.

 

"Rather than improve forest management to store additional carbon, ecological and statistical flaws in California's offsets program create incentives to generate credits that do not reflect real climate benefits," said the analysis https://carbonplan.org/research/forest-offsets-explainer.

 

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39 minutes ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

Hehe......hehe.....”Glory Hole”

 

BTW, that "Glory Hole" is the same one from this meme:

 

divided+by+zero.jpg

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Wyoming stands up for coal with threat to sue states that refuse to buy it

 

Republican governor says measure sends message that Wyoming is ‘prepared to bring litigation to protect her interests’


Wyoming is faced by a transition to renewable energy that’s gathering pace across America, but it has now come up with a novel and controversial plan to protect its mining industry – sue other states that refuse to take its coal.

 

A new state law has created a $1.2m fund to be used by Wyoming’s governor to take legal action against other states that opt to power themselves with clean energy such as solar and wind, in order to meet targets to tackle the climate crisis, rather than burn Wyoming’s coal.


Wyoming is America’s largest coal-producing state, digging up nearly 40% of the coal produced nationally each year. The state is heavily dependent upon revenues from mining to run basic services and as it produces 14 times more energy than it consumes, selling coal to other states is a vital source of income.

 

The measure sends a message that Wyoming is “prepared to bring litigation to protect her interests,” said a spokesman for Mark Gordon, the Republican governor of the deeply conservative state, which strongly backed Donald Trump in the last two presidential elections.

 

Trump promised, but failed, to revive a coal industry in deep decline across the US, with Wyoming’s mining sector shedding thousands of jobs in recent years as utilities switch to cheap supplies of gas and states such as California move to phase out polluting fuel sources from their power generation.

 

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1 hour ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

How are you going to sue just because someone doesn't want to buy your product?

Jokes aside, I had the same thought. Maybe it means if states cancel contracts before the terms are settled?

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On 4/20/2021 at 2:03 PM, China said:

Carbon emissions to soar in 2021 by second highest rate in history

 

Carbon dioxide emissions are forecast to jump this year by the second biggest annual rise in history, as global economies pour stimulus cash into fossil fuels in the recovery from the Covid-19 recession.

 

The leap will be second only to the massive rebound 10 years ago after the financial crisis, and will put climate hopes out of reach unless governments act quickly, the International Energy Agency has warned.

 

Surging use of coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel, for electricity is largely driving the emissions rise, especially across Asia but also in the US. Coal’s rebound causes particular concern because it comes despite plunging prices for renewable energy, which is now cheaper than coal.

 

Speaking exclusively to the Guardian, Fatih Birol, the executive director of the IEA, and one of the world’s leading authorities on energy and climate, said: “This is shocking and very disturbing. On the one hand, governments today are saying climate change is their priority. But on the other hand, we are seeing the second biggest emissions rise in history. It is really disappointing.”

 

Click on the link for the full article

 

 


2020: Factories shut down low emissions

2021: Factories reopen: Ahhh carbon monoxide emissions growing at explosive rate
 

Disingenuous article. I’m sure the world be a better place with all those factories closed... 👀 

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1 hour ago, CousinsCowgirl84 said:

I’m sure the world be a better place with all those factories closed...


.... with all those factories operating, with less CO2 emissions. 

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3 hours ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

How are you going to sue just because someone doesn't want to buy your product?

 

2 hours ago, youngestson said:

Jokes aside, I had the same thought. Maybe it means if states cancel contracts before the terms are settled?

 

It's an argument based on the Constitutional principle that states may not discriminate in commerce based on state of origin.  Of course the argument is shoddy in this case because declining demand for coal has to do with the product itself, not because it comes from Wyoming.  But it's not like stupid legal arguments ever stopped someone from filing a lawsuit or threatening one (e.g. - see thread title).

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1 hour ago, CousinsCowgirl84 said:


that’s fine of course.  But you don’t have to write a disingenuous article to make your point.  

 

Didn't your post try to make the point that people want those factories to stay shut down?  

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Larry said:

 

Didn't your post try to make the point that people want those factories to stay shut down?  


not really.

 

Maybe my post was disingenuous too... 🤯

Edited by CousinsCowgirl84
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  • 4 weeks later...

A 20-Foot Sea Wall? Miami Faces the Hard Choices of Climate Change.

 

hree years ago, not long after Hurricane Irma left parts of Miami underwater, the federal government embarked on a study to find a way to protect the vulnerable South Florida coast from deadly and destructive storm surge.

 

Already, no one likes the answer.

 

Build a wall, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers proposed in its first draft of the study, now under review. Six miles of it, in fact, mostly inland, running parallel to the coast through neighborhoods — except for a 1-mile stretch right on Biscayne Bay, past the gleaming sky-rises of Brickell, the city’s financial district.

 

The dramatic, $6 billion proposal remains tentative and at least five years off. But the startling suggestion of a massive sea wall up to 20 feet high cutting across beautiful Biscayne Bay was enough to jolt some Miamians to attention. The hard choices that will be necessary to deal with the city’s many environmental challenges are here, and few people want to face them.

 

“You need to have a conversation about, culturally, what are our priorities?” said Benjamin Kirtman, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Miami. “Where do we want to invest? Where does it make sense?

 

“Those are what I refer to as generational questions,” he added. “And there is a tremendous amount of reluctance to enter into that discussion.”

 

In Miami, the U.S. metropolitan area that is perhaps most exposed to sea-level rise, the problem is not climate change denialism. Not when hurricane season, which begins this week, returns each year with more intense and frequent storms. Not when finding flood insurance has become increasingly difficult and unaffordable. Not when the nights stay so hot that leaving the house with a sweater to fend off the evening chill has become a thing of the past.

 

The trouble is that the magnitude of the interconnected obstacles the region faces can feel overwhelming, and none of the possible solutions is cheap, easy or pretty.

 

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Ice shelf protecting Antarctic glacier is breaking up faster

 

A critical Antarctic glacier is looking more vulnerable as satellite images show the ice shelf that blocks it from collapsing into the sea is breaking up much faster than before and spawning huge icebergs, a new study says.

 

The Pine Island Glacier's ice shelf loss accelerated in 2017, causing scientists to worry that with climate change the glacier's collapse could happen quicker than the many centuries predicted. The floating ice shelf acts like a cork in a bottle for the fast-melting glacier and prevents its much larger ice mass from flowing into the ocean.

 

That ice shelf has retreated by 12 miles (20 kilometers) between 2017 and 2020, according to a study in Friday’s Science Advances. And the crumbling shelf was caught on time-lapse video from a European satellite that takes pictures every six days.

 

“You can see stuff just tearing apart," said study lead author Ian Joughin, a University of Washington glaciologist. “So it almost looks like the speed-up itself is weakening the glacier. ... And so far we’ve lost maybe 20% of the main shelf.”

 

Between 2017 and 2020, there were three large breakup events, creating icebergs more than 5 miles (8 kilometers) long and 22 miles (36 kilometers) wide, which then split into lots of littler pieces, Joughin said. There also were many smaller breakups.

 

“It’s not at all inconceivable that the whole shelf could give way and go within a few years,” Joughin said. “I’d say that’s a long shot, but not a very long shot.”

 

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Here's a set of pictures from  the journal article cited the journal article cited in the story above.

 

F2.large.jpg?width=800&height=600&carous

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