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I want to sue the republican party for willful denial of scientific evidence about climate change.


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Major Oil Companies Take A Pass On Controversial Lease Sale In Arctic Refuge

 

One of the Trump administration's biggest environmental rollbacks suffered a stunning setback Wednesday, as a decades-long push to drill for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ended with a lease sale that attracted just three bidders — one of which was the state of Alaska itself.

 

Alaska's state-owned economic development corporation was the only bidder on nine of the parcels offered for lease in the northernmost swath of the refuge, known as the coastal plain. Two small companies also each picked up a single parcel.

 

Half of the offered leases drew no bids at all.

 

"They held the lease in ANWR — that is history-making. That will be recorded in the history books and people will talk about it," said Larry Persily, a longtime observer of the oil and gas industry in Alaska . "But no one showed up."

 

The sale generated a tiny fraction of the revenue it was projected to raise.

 

It was a striking moment in a 40-year fight over drilling in the coastal plain, an area that's home to migrating caribou, polar bears, birds and other wildlife. It also potentially sits atop billions of barrels of oil, according to federal estimates.

 

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Bill Gates: Climate change could be more devastating than Covid-19 pandemic—this is what the US must do to prepare

 

“As awful as this pandemic is, climate change could be worse.” So says billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates in a recent blog post.

 

“A global crisis has shocked the world. It is causing a tragic number of deaths, making people afraid to leave home, and leading to economic hardship not seen in many generations. Its effects are rippling across the world,” Gates wrote. “Obviously, I am talking about COVID-19. But in just a few decades, the same description will fit another global crisis: climate change.”

 

To prevent the deaths, damage and destruction that will come with a warming planet requires innovation, he said.

 

That has become more clear than ever before because though the pandemic has brought travel and economic activity almost to a standstill, greenhouse gas emissions still haven’t been reduced enough to stave off the worst ramifications, Gates said.

 

“What’s remarkable is not how much emissions will go down because of the pandemic, but how little,” Gates wrote. “The relatively small decline in emissions this year makes one thing clear: We cannot get to zero emissions simply—or even mostly—by flying and driving less.” That’s not to say that reducing consumption of fuel that emits carbon gas emissions is not a worthy goal, just that it is not enough, Gates said.

 

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Coronavirus causes largest U.S. greenhouse gas emissions drop since World War Two: report

 

 U.S. greenhouse gas emissions fell 10.3% in 2020, the largest drop in emissions in the post-World War II era, as the coronavirus crippled the economy, according to a report released Tuesday by the Rhodium Group.

 

The economic fallout from the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 - especially in big emitting sectors like transportation, power and industry - resulted in a sharper emissions drop than the 2009 recession, when emissions slid 6.3%.

 

The drop means that the United States would outperform its pledge made under the Copenhagen climate accord to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 17% below 2005 levels by 2020. Emissions will actually drop by 21.5% compared with 2005.

 

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New U.S. Strategy Would Quickly Free Billions in Climate Funds

 

Federal officials, showing how rapidly the Biden administration is overhauling climate policy after years of denial under former President Donald J. Trump, aim to free up as much as $10 billion at the Federal Emergency Management Agency to protect against climate disasters before they strike.

 

The agency, best known for responding to hurricanes, floods and wildfires, wants to spend the money to pre-emptively protect against damage by building seawalls, elevating or relocating flood-prone homes and taking other steps as climate change intensifies storms and other natural disasters.

 

“It would dwarf all previous grant programs of its kind,” said Daniel Kaniewski, a former deputy administrator at FEMA and now a managing director at Marsh & McLennan Companies, a consulting firm.

 

The FEMA plan would use a budgeting maneuver to repurpose a portion of the agency’s overall disaster spending toward projects designed to protect against damage from climate disasters, according to people familiar with discussions inside the agency.

 

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Biden signs 'existential' executive orders on climate and environment

 

US President Joe Biden has signed a series of executive orders designed to address climate change, including a new ban on some energy drilling.

 

The orders aim to freeze new oil and gas leases on public lands and double offshore wind-produced energy by 2030.

 

They are expected to meet stiff resistance from the energy industry and come as a sea change from Donald Trump, who cut environmental protections.

 

"Today is climate day at the White House," said Mr Biden on Wednesday.

 

"We have already waited too long," Mr Biden told reporters at the White House. "And we can't wait any longer."

 

Mr Biden said the US "must lead" a global response to the climate change crisis.

 

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An invisible, odorless gas is pitting Texas against the Biden administration

 

Deep in the heart of Texas, above an oil patch about the size of Kansas, a little team in a small plane is trying to reveal a big problem.

 

They are methane hunters. With an infrared camera and a Picarro Cavity Ring-Down Laser Spectroscope, they fly spirals over pumps and compressor stations that stretch to both horizons. With each tight corkscrew, the little airplane sniffs out and measures planet-cooking, climate-changing pollution as the region below braces for an energy revolution amid a cold civil war.


The Picarro spectrometer is so sensitive, it caught the number of carbon dioxide molecules in my breath as we walked around the hangar. In the sky, it counts the density of carbon dioxide molecules on their way to heating up the sea, land and sky for the next 300 to 1,000 years.


More importantly, it also measures methane, which is 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide over the next 20 years. You know it better as natural gas. Heating and cooking are not the only methane culprits. Two-thirds of emissions come from belching cows, factory farms and rotting landfills. But as any Texan will tell you, it's a lot easier to control gas coming out of the ground than gas coming out of cows.

 

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In a state that once sang ‘Freeze a Yankee,’ the myth of an invincible Texas crumbles

 

Forty years ago, Texans felt so indestructible that we sang along when a Dallas radio station played “Freeze a Yankee”:

 

Cut off the gas, turn off the oil

And let ‘em all freeze and boil

 

After the most costly storm in state history destroyed homes, businesses, cities and lives, songwriter Bob Arnold of Dallas said last week was “just completely embarrassing” for Texas.

 

“Now the Yankees are not freezing — we are,” he said.

 

If you thought the last week was the end of the nightmare, think again.

 

Both years Texas had record winter cold — 1899 and 1949 — they were followed by deadly floods.

 

In 1899, our coldest winter on record was followed by 12 straight days of rain that June, inundating Waco, Belton and much of Central Texas along the Brazos and Colorado rivers.

 

In Fort Worth, the low temperature last week was 2 below zero. That matched a chilly low Jan. 31, 1949.

 

Three months later — barely time to recover — more than 10 inches of rain turned the Trinity River into a sea 14 blocks wide.

 

The 1949 flood killed 10 people and pushed 13,000 people out of their waterlogged homes.

 

Climate change makes events like last week less likely, not more likely, Nielson-Gammon said.

 

Yes, we get more hurricanes, wildfires, tornadoes and drought. But there’s no indication that we are getting more extreme cold or winter storms.

 

Jennifer Francis, an Arctic climate-change scientist at the Massachusetts-based Woodwell Climate Research Center, agreed that we can expect fewer record cold spells.

 

But she didn’t let Texas leaders off the hook.

 

She wrote by email: “Lawmakers chose to ignore the chorus of scientists who warned that extreme events like this one will still happen, thus leaving millions of people and basic infrastructure vulnerable to damaging impacts of severe weather like this.”

 

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They ignored us right up to the storm.

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5 minutes ago, China said:

In a state that once sang ‘Freeze a Yankee,’ the myth of an invincible Texas crumbles

 

Forty years ago, Texans felt so indestructible that we sang along when a Dallas radio station played “Freeze a Yankee”:

 

Cut off the gas, turn off the oil

And let ‘em all freeze and boil

...do you want us to freeze or boil? Even their songs need to be regulated.

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Hundreds of snowmen surround Capitol, protesters urge Romney to take climate action

 

Over hundreds of snowmen are currently surrounding the State Capitol, Sunday.

 

On February 21, hundreds of snowmen have appeared outside the Utah State Capitol building holding signs demanding a price on carbon to save their ‘endangered species’, targeting their delivery at Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney.

 

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The snowmen are also seen displaying Twitter handle @pricecarbonplz. A Twitter account known for highlighting snowmen from all around the country also demanding a price on carbon.

 

According to a press release, doppelganger snowmen were also on the other side of the country last week outside Chuck Schumer’s New York office demanding climate action.

 

No organization has claimed responsibility for the mirror gatherings.

 

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Annapolis, Battling Sea Level Rise, Sues 26 Oil Companies

 

The city of Annapolis, Md., one of the oldest state capitals in the nation, is sinking into the quickly-rising Chesapeake Bay. Last year, the city experienced 65 days of flooding. By mid-century, it's expected to see 360 days of flooding a year.

 

The blame for this, city leaders say, falls in part on big oil. That's why Annapolis has filed suit against more than two dozen companies that city officials say are responsible for rising sea levels — and for the tens of millions of dollars climate change is costing Annapolis taxpayers.

 

"This lawsuit is not trying to solve climate change. It is designed to help Annapolis survive climate change," said Mayor Gavin Buckley, during a press conference.

 

"The fossil fuel industry knew for the past 50 years that their industry was pushing the environment to a tipping point, where combating climate change would become progressively difficult. The companies worked to deceive people of the danger, hiding their knowledge and engaging in an intentional campaign to mislead the public about the science," Buckley said.

 

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Rich NIMBY assholes strike again:

 

“They Aren’t Used to Losing”: Rich Hamptonites Clash Over an Offshore Wind Farm

 

Should Joe Biden’s plans for a huge expansion of renewable energy across the US survive the gamut of congressional bickering, a very different obstacle threatens progress—wealthy homeowners who enjoy sweeping scenic views.

 

Wainscott, a hamlet in the wealthy New York enclave of the Hamptons, is the unlikely setting for a rancorous battle over what would be the state’s first offshore wind farm. A flurry of angry letters to the local newspaper has escalated to petitions, the hiring of high-powered lobbyists and now lawsuits, in what could presage similar quarrels elsewhere as the Biden administration seeks to support a national boom in new wind turbines at sea and on land.

 

The subject of this turmoil isn’t even the wind turbines themselves, a 15-strong cluster called South Fork wind farm that would sit about 35 miles off Montauk, the extreme eastern end of New York’s Long Island. The upscale eastern tip of Long Island, a narrow landmass that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean, is fringed by beaches and is known for its wineries, upscale dining and opulent homes. Wainscott is on the southern flank of Long Island and so the turbines wouldn’t be visible from its beach, but a cable to connect the wind farm would have to burrow underneath the hamlet’s beach and several of its streets to join with a substation further inland.

 

The prospect of this underground extension cable, which would help provide power to about 70,000 Long Island homes, has enraged a cadre of Wainscott property owners, including Ronald Lauder, of cosmetic company Estée Lauder money, who have congregated in a group named Citizens for the Preservation of Wainscott. Gouri Edlich, chair of the group, has criticized the wind farm’s developer, the Danish company Ørsted, for being “heartless” and “tone deaf” and claimed that Van Scoyoc has “simply turned over our beach and our rural community to this multinational developer.”

 

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CAN A HUGE BALLOON DROPPING CHALK FROM THE SKY HELP SLOW CLIMATE CHANGE?

 

In the race against climate change, scientists at Harvard University propose that dimming sunlight could cool down the planet.

 

But what does that mean? The ambitious project involves launching a huge balloon into the stratosphere, carrying 600kg of calcium carbonate - or chalk, which would be sprayed 12 miles above the Earth’s surface.

 

Scientists will then monitor how the dust particles interact with the atmosphere. It’s a process known as solar geoengineering.

 

The chalk would, in theory, reflect sunlight and in turn slow global warming. Some experts predict the sky would also shift from blue to white during daylight hours.

 

Originally announced in December 2020, the idea has recently received backing from Microsoft co-founder and 4th richest person in the world, Bill Gates, which has raised its profile significantly. The experiment will allegedly cost around $20 million (€16.8 million).

 

The balloon launch test, which could happen as soon as June of this year, will take off from the town of Kiruna in Sweden. The country is described as having “promising flight trajectories and significant experience launching scientific balloons” by the Keutsch Group at Harvard.

 

Critics of the project are sceptical, claiming that cooling the planet in this way would only mask the problem of climate change rather than offering any sort of solution.

 

Engineering the climate with what is essentially an artificial sunshade doesn’t address the root cause of the crisis - the amount of carbon generated by fossil fuels all over the world.

 

Many fear that it could undermine international commitments to act under the 2015 Paris climate agreement and could also have unwanted side-effects.

 

We spoke to Johanna Sandahl, president of The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, Sweden’s largest environmental organisation.

 

“It must be stopped,” she begins.

 

“We’re talking about a technology with the potential for extreme consequences that could alter hydrological cycles, disrupt monsoon patterns and increase drought. It stands out as unmanageable and too dangerous to ever be used,” Sandahl tells Euronews Living.

 

Isadora Wronski, head of Greenpeace Sweden, agrees.

 

“It is extremely risky in many ways,” she tells Euronews Living. “If implemented at the scale necessary to have an impact on global temperatures, they could cause inherently unpredictable shocks to the climate system.”

 

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More:

 

The first test of a project backed to spray millions of tonnes of chalk into the stratosphere, in an attempt to 'dim the sun' and cool the Earth, could happen in June.

 

Harvard University experts will test the system by sending a large balloon 12 miles above the Swedish town of Kiruna and have it drop 2kg of chalk dust into the stratosphere.

 

The aim of the estimated $3 million mission, backed by billionaire Bill Gates, is to have the chalk deflect a portion of the sun's radiation, stop it from hitting the surface, and cool the planet.


The idea has been heavily criticised since its inception, with project director Frank Keutsch even calling the need for this scale of geo-engineering 'terrifying'.

 

And experts have warned that the unusual technique could be disastrous for weather systems in ways nobody can predict.

 

Backed by a range of private donors including Gates, the test mission is launching from Sweden as they could offer a launch by the end of this summer. 

 

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That Ron Johnson idiot tried to make some dumb claims about how Greenland "used to be green, but now it is icy, so therefore the effects of climate change are not too bad" (paraphrasing).  When confronted by actual facts he brushed it off of course saying "Well, that is just what I assumed"   

 

These are the people who control our fate when it comes to this issue. 

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47 minutes ago, The Evil Genius said:

It's going to be a long summer.

 

At the rate we are going, you ain't seen nothin' in terms of "long summers" yet.  They're gonna be nice and long by mid century.

 

On the bright side we could always just start building housing in the oceans were the layer of plastic refuse floating on the surface should provide some nice shade.

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On 4/5/2021 at 3:08 PM, The Evil Genius said:

It's going to be a long summer. 

 

 

 

 

Not just California...

 

Southwest braces for water cutbacks as drought deepens along the Colorado River

 

Unrelenting drought and years of rising temperatures due to climate change are pushing the long-overallocated Colorado River into new territory, setting the stage for the largest mandatory water cutbacks to date.

 

Lake Mead, the biggest reservoir on the river, has declined dramatically over the past two decades and now stands at just 40% of its full capacity. This summer, it’s projected to fall to the lowest levels since it was filled in the 1930s following the construction of Hoover Dam.

 

The reservoir near Las Vegas is approaching a threshold that is expected to trigger a first-ever shortage declaration by the federal government for next year, leading to substantial cuts in water deliveries to Arizona, Nevada and Mexico.   

 

Arizona is in line for the biggest reductions under a 2019 agreement that aims to reduce the risks of Lake Mead falling to critical lows.

 

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Check this:

 

https://arachnoid.com/NaturalResources/

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First-Ever Observations From Under Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ Are Bad News

 

Glaciers all over Antarctica are in trouble as ice there rapidly melts. There’s no Antarctic glacier whose fate is more consequential for our future than the Thwaites Glacier, and new research shows that things aren’t looking good for it.

 

Researchers have known that the Thwaites Glacier is in trouble due to encroaching warm waters, but they’d never actually analyzed data from beneath the glacier’s float ice shelf—until now. A new study published in Science Advances on Friday presents the first-ever direct observations of what’s going under the infamous ice shelf, including the temperature and salinity of the water that’s flowing under it as well as the strength of the current.

 

What they found is pretty troubling. The authors explain that the supply of warm water to the glacier’s base is larger than scientists previously believed, which means it’s even more unstable than we thought. Given that it’s often called the “doomsday glacier,” that’s particularly ominous.

 

Thwaites glacier a broad, vast hunk of ice that flows from the West Antarctic ice sheet into Pine Island Bay, a part of the Amundsen Sea. The 119,300-square-mile (192,000-square-kilometer) ice shelf is disappearing faster than any other one in the region in large part because of the waters circulating beneath it and wearing away at its base. If it collapses completely, it could have a devastating effect on global sea level rise.

 

All this has very serious consequences for those living along the coast. Thwaites Glacier’s collapse would raise sea levels by 1.5 to 3 feet (0.5 to 0.9 meters), and could also trigger an even worse chain of events because it could initiate the collapse of another nearby imperiled ice shelf, the Pine Island Glacier. Together, these shelves act as a braking mechanism on land ice that, if released into the open waters, could push seas up to 10 feet (3.1 meters), overwhelming coastal cities around the world.

 

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On 4/6/2021 at 5:40 PM, China said:

 

Not just California...

 

Southwest braces for water cutbacks as drought deepens along the Colorado River

 

Unrelenting drought and years of rising temperatures due to climate change are pushing the long-overallocated Colorado River into new territory, setting the stage for the largest mandatory water cutbacks to date.

 

Lake Mead, the biggest reservoir on the river, has declined dramatically over the past two decades and now stands at just 40% of its full capacity. This summer, it’s projected to fall to the lowest levels since it was filled in the 1930s following the construction of Hoover Dam.

 

The reservoir near Las Vegas is approaching a threshold that is expected to trigger a first-ever shortage declaration by the federal government for next year, leading to substantial cuts in water deliveries to Arizona, Nevada and Mexico.   

 

Arizona is in line for the biggest reductions under a 2019 agreement that aims to reduce the risks of Lake Mead falling to critical lows.

 

Click on the link for the full article

 

Check this:

 

https://arachnoid.com/NaturalResources/

 

Western states on verge of worst drought in modern history

 

Some scientists believe the Western United States is on the verge of a permanent drought. 

 

A permanent drought is characterized by an unchanging dry climate, sparse vegetation and increased risk of wildfires.

 

Recent years have seen expansive droughts and longer fire seasons, following the year 2000 when scientists say the Western U.S. entered a megadrought. Found to be the second worst in 1,200 years, the megadrought was spurred by a combination of dry elements and climate change brought on by human activity.

 

Over the last 20 years, the two worst droughts occurred in 2003 and 2013.

 

The concern is heightened as the Western states enter the summer dry season, with the U.S. Drought Monitor anticipating the driest conditions leading to water restrictions and an aggressive fire season.  

 

The U.S. Drought Monitor currently reads that Western states are experiencing temperatures ranging from 4 to 15 degrees above normal, and last year’s wet season saw 25 percent to 50 percent of its average rainfall. 

 

Complicating matters, the West’s southern areas only received 50 percent to 75 percent of their normal snowpack. In the West, lakes, rivers, and reservoirs depend on melting snow to replenish them. These then provide water to residents. For example, the Colorado River provides water for 40 million people and 5 million acres of farmland, according to an article by ABC. 

 

This is a recurring issue, with snowpack decreasing by 25 percent in Western states over the last 40 years. Now, the combination of lack of water, dry conditions and increased temperatures has caused concern as the area reenters fire season.

 

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Business to Biden: Join us

 

Business to Biden: If you raise the bar on climate, we will, too.

 

Big investors and a list of blue-chip corporations asked President Joe Biden to commit to cutting U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in the next decade by at least 50 percent from 2005 levels.

Audacious? Maybe. But the fact is that plenty of companies already are well on their way there, with or without Washington. And in a letter to Biden on Tuesday, they made him an offer.

 

“If you raise the bar on our national ambition, we will raise our own ambition to move the U.S. forward on this journey,” the group wrote. “While an effective national climate strategy will require all of us, you alone can set the course by swiftly establishing a bold U.S. 2030 target.”

 

“You can count on our support.”

 

WHO SIGNED — Tech: Adobe, Apple, HP, Dell Technologies, Microsoft, SAP. Utility and energy bigs: PG&E, Exelon, SUEZ. Industrials: Siemens, Saint-Gobain, General Electric, Deutsche Post DHL Group. Food brands: McDonald’s, Mars, Nestle, and Danone North America. Fashion and retail giants: Ralph Lauren, Gap, H&M, Levi Strauss & Co., Nike, IKEA, Walmart, YKK. And more: Philip Morris, Sodexo.

 

“The urgency could not be clearer: climate change poses an existential threat to society and to business,” Levi’s Chief Sustainability Officer Jeffrey Hogue said. “Addressing the climate crisis requires rapid action at an economywide scale.”

 

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US, China agree to cooperate on climate crisis with urgency

 

The United States and China, the world’s two biggest carbon polluters, agreed to cooperate to curb climate change with urgency, just days before President Joe Biden hosts a virtual summit of world leaders to discuss the issue.

 

The agreement was reached by U.S. special envoy for climate John Kerry and his Chinese counterpart Xie Zhenhua during two days of talks in Shanghai last week, according to a joint statement.

 

The two countries “are committed to cooperating with each other and with other countries to tackle the climate crisis, which must be addressed with the seriousness and urgency that it demands,” said the statement, issued Saturday evening U.S. time.

 

Meeting with reporters in Seoul on Sunday, Kerry said the language in the statement is “strong” and that the two countries agreed on “critical elements on where we have to go.” But the former secretary of state said, “I learned in diplomacy that you don’t put your back on the words, you put on actions. We all need to see what happens.”

 

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Five Culinary Winners and Losers of Climate Change

 

All over the world, the cultivation of food decorates the fabric of our landscape.

 

Yet warming temperatures are remaking our surroundings—and with them, our culinary world. The cultivation of crops is shifting northward or to higher elevations. Just like animals, some crops are losing ground to climate change, whereas others are gaining it.

 

Here we take a look at several winners and losers of global delicacies over the next century.

 

Loser: European Spirits

One key ingredient to the potent spirit absinthe is the botanical Artemisia genipi, commonly called wormwood, which grows in high alpine environments.

A study in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution found that botanicals used in absinthe, eau de vie, and traditional medicines are at risk of losing habitat. The plants develop at the foot of melting glaciers, where ice has recently retreated. But if the glaciers retreat too quickly, competition among plants could reduce the diversity of plant life in the glacier’s shadow.

 

Winner: Czech Truffles

Climate change in central Europe will increase the appearance of one species of truffles, Tuber melanosporum (Périgord truffle), in the Czech Republic, according to a study in Scientific Reports published last year.

Because of more favorable factors encouraging truffle growth—like temperature, precipitation, elevation, and soil pH—the area suitable for Périgord truffles will expand by 2050. 

 

Loser: Spanish Olive Oil
By 2100, the output of southern Spain’s olive oil could drop by 30% because of changing climate. That’s bad news for Andalusia, which produces a third of the world’s olive oil.

 

Winner: Canadian Wine

In just 40 years, the bitter cold winters in northeastern Canada may be just right for European wine varieties. Freezing temperatures are giving way to more temperate weather, meaning that frigid temperatures won’t harm more delicate grapes.

Pinot noir could have a 70%–90% chance of favorable growing conditions in Quebec by 2050. In the nearby Estrie region, which borders northern Vermont, there could be a 70% chance of favorable growing conditions for European grapes. 

 

Too Soon to Call: Ethiopian Coffee
The seed responsible for the most popular coffee in the world, arabica, originated in the Ethiopian highlands. But its homeland is in trouble: A study in Nature Plants predicts that 39%–59% of the country’s low-elevation coffee cultivation is at risk. The range depends on how much more greenhouse gas emissions humans put into the atmosphere.

 

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