steve09ru

The Grilling and Cooking Thread

Recommended Posts

Again, I didn't pay that, but yes

Price the stainless steel one. I think it is $15k or something

Chargriller Akorn costs about 300 and if cook has skills produces same Edited by Redskins Diehard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chargriller Akorn costs about 300 and if cook has skills produces same

A Vietnamese street vendor could smoke all of us with 3 pieces of coal and an old wire grate, so not sure your point

People tend to spend the extra money to get components that last longer and handle more use. If the Chargriller steel grills are any indication of their quality and I think I would pass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Vietnamese street vendor could smoke all of us with 3 pieces of coal and an old wire grate, so not sure your point

People tend to spend the extra money to get components that last longer and handle more use. If the Chargriller steel grills are any indication of their quality and I think $300 is way too much

You said the broken grill was too expensive to replace so posted a less expensive option that you will likely get the same results from.

I don't know anything about the steel grills you are referring to. Good thing you went with the one that lasts longer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You said the broken grill was too expensive to replace so posted a less expensive option that you will likely get the same results from.

I don't know anything about the steel grills you are referring to. Good thing you went with the one that lasts longer

I have an Akorn & love it. Only paid $149 for it 3 years ago. Is it a BGE? No, but I can hold 250 for 13 hours without a problem. One of the sites I visit (Kamadoguru.com) have people reporting they can hold 225 for 24+ hours without adding charcoal on an Akorn. 

 

The hottest I've had the Akorn is about 700 degrees to cook pizza. I'd be afraid of taking it much higher than that for fear of ruining the seals between the lid & lower section. However, if I wasn't going to  close the lid to cook, I'd have no problem getting it up higher. I don't eat steak that much so I really don't have a need to get the smoker very hot. Most things (besides pizza) are on the low & slow cooking mode. So my criteria for success is being able to hold a steady temp for a long duration. The Akorn can do it without a problem. 

 

I think what Zoony is referring to are the 'regular' (non-Kamado-style) Chargriller grills that are out there (gas & charcoal) - they aren't known for their longevity. But pretty much anything besides a Weber has a pretty short lifespan.

 

When I hit the MegaMillion on Saturday night I'll get that stainless steel monster Zoony posted above...

Edited by GoSkins0721

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, that's already on my list!

 

You won't be sorry.

 

I'll put the Slow N' Sear up against almost any smoker on the market.  It holds temps, rock-solid, for over 8hrs.  

 

In addition to smoking, it can be used to produce afterburner type heat, for searing, (I prefer reverse searing), steaks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at a Kroger in RVA yesterday & saw they have the newer model Chargriller Akorn for $329. It's the one with the smoker & side cart similar to this one. 

 

If you're in the market for one of these, keep your eye on them until they go on sale - usually in mid-late-June. They'll have them for 1/2 price. 

 

 

 

41KgQBEgYiL.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoking chicken tonigh. I finish it off over direct heat to get a nice crispy char. Probably one of my favorite things I think I like it better than just about anything

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad somebody bumped this thread. I've got a good handle on temp control with the kettle for the basics now I think, and we've got a freezer full of meat to demolish this spring and summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoking chicken tonigh. I finish it off over direct heat to get a nice crispy char. Probably one of my favorite things I think I like it better than just about anything

 

Yeah, it's tough to beat crispy chicken especially when it's smoked on a grill. 

 

I have a 16.5 lb turkey that's getting smoked on the Akorn tomorrow. I just bought a spiralizer so I'm going to try some smoked spiral sweet potatoes to go along with it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fired up the pit last weekend for my baby's birthday, finally getting the hang of pork butt ...I still prefer brisket.

 

the ribs were killer 

pecan smoke is delicious

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoked a chuck roast yesterday, on the Weber kettle with the Slow n Sear.

Dry-brined it, the day before, and used a basic beef rub, (garlic powder, mustard, onion powder, sugar, black pepper & chipotle)

10hr @ 230°, with a couple of hickory chunks. I pulled it when the internal temp hit 207, and stuck it in a faux cambro, for a couple hours.

It wass excellent. If you've never smoked a "chuckie", I can highly recommend it. The method for smoking, is nearly identical to pork butt. The main difference is that you need to take it to a higher temp, (if you want pull it), and resting it,(for at least an hour, two is better), is critical

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rick, did you do anything to seal the lid of your Weber kettles?  I'm considered getting a gasket kit or some high-temp silicone sealant.  I was toying with some wood chips (not a long smoke, just chips to add flavor) and it made it very clear that lots of air leaked around the lid.  Even with the vents almost all the way closed I couldn't get the temp in the indirect area below about 300.

 

I have my Slow n Sear on the way (and I probably needed less charcoal) so I'm going to try those two things first, but I'm wondering if I should seal the lid better before I try to do long smokes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rick, did you do anything to seal the lid of your Weber kettles? I'm considered getting a gasket kit or some high-temp silicone sealant. I was toying with some wood chips (not a long smoke, just chips to add flavor) and it made it very clear that lots of air leaked around the lid. Even with the vents almost all the way closed I couldn't get the temp in the indirect area below about 300.

I have my Slow n Sear on the way (and I probably needed less charcoal) so I'm going to try those two things first, but I'm wondering if I should seal the lid better before I try to do long smokes.

Don't bother with sealants and stuff like that. All kettles leak, and a little leak produces a fair amount of smoke. You can use a few of those big black binder clips.

The Slow n Sear will make a huge difference, in holding temps. It uses the."minion method", (google it). Just read the lighting instructions, and vent control directions carefully. They have a great web-site and, if you have questions, shoot me a PM

Something else, and this is critical, get a couple of decent leave-in digital thermometers with probes. They're cheap. Do not rely on the ****ty bi-metal thermometer on the grill lid. Mine is off 70°. Even when I re-calibrate it, it doesn't stay accurate for long.

I cannot over-emphasize the importance of a couple of digital BBQ thermometers. One for measuring temps at the food grate, and one to leave in the food.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot over-emphasize the importance of a couple of digital BBQ thermometers. One for measuring temps at the food grate, and one to leave in the food.

Oh and they make those wireless too.  So you can be relaxing in the house watching a game and it beeps at you if it gets out of your set parameters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and they make those wireless too. So you can be relaxing in the house watching a game and it beeps at you if it gets out of your set parameters.

Yup.

I forgot to mention that, because the vast majority of them are wireless.

A couple instant read thermometers are important too. Good ones, like the one's that they sell at Thermo Works, inexpensive, (under $30.00),super-fast,(3-6 seconds),and very accurate,(NIST-traceable calibrated),for under $30.00.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't bother with sealants and stuff like that. All kettles leak, and a little leak produces a fair amount of smoke. You can use a few of those big black binder clips.

The Slow n Sear will make a huge difference, in holding temps. It uses the."minion method", (google it). Just read the lighting instructions, and vent control directions carefully. They have a great web-site and, if you have questions, shoot me a PM

Something else, and this is critical, get a couple of decent leave-in digital thermometers with probes. They're cheap. Do not rely on the ****ty bi-metal thermometer on the grill lid. Mine is off 70°. Even when I re-calibrate it, it doesn't stay accurate for long.

I cannot over-emphasize the importance of a couple of digital BBQ thermometers. One for measuring temps at the food grate, and one to leave in the food.

Yeah I was using a digital.  Mine is a simple kettle that doesn't even have a built-in themometer, but I know they're crap anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knocked out some boneless chicken thighs on Sunday. They're just the best.

Thighs are my favorite part of the chicken! Gotta cook them bone in though. They fall off the bone so easily anyway so why not, save some money and get all that great flavor

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thighs are my favorite part of the chicken! Gotta cook them bone in though. They fall off the bone so easily anyway so why not, save some money and get all that great flavor

 

Yeah I've using been thighs to make chicken bbq for the past several years. Better flavor & not nearly as dry as chicken breast. Not to mention the cheap price at Costco for both bone in & boneless thighs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thighs are my favorite part of the chicken! Gotta cook them bone in though. They fall off the bone so easily anyway so why not, save some money and get all that great flavor

Oh yeah. Bone-in is strong too. Just went with the boneless this time...they take the marinade a little better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My basic ribs:

 

Two baby back pork ribs, or other ribs if you prefer.

 

1/3 cup pepper

 

1/3 cup salt

 

1 cup brown sugar

 

1/2 bottle rye whiskey

 

That's your BBQ sauce.

 

Slow cook ribs for at least six hours over a natural flame, low but constant heat.  Coat the ribs every 15 minutes at least with the sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.