Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

The Grilling and Cooking Thread


Recommended Posts

Gave the Slow and Sear a dry run tonight for a little while. I didn't have time to let it run for eight hours, but it held the temp nicely for the time that I had.

Then I threw some more coals on and blistered some peppers, warmed up some tortillas in foil on the cool side, and seared a skirt steak for fajitas.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gave the Slow and Sear a dry run tonight for a little while. I didn't have time to let it run for eight hours, but it held the temp nicely for the time that I had.

Then I threw some more coals on and blistered some peppers, warmed up some tortillas in foil on the cool side, and seared a skirt steak for fajitas.

Sounds good.

I've gotten so used to using it, now I seldom take it out of the grill. In addition to smoking meats, I reverse sear steaks in it, cook whole, spatch-****ed chickens, sausages, pit-beef, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you put water in it every time, or just for a smoke?

I put the water in yesterday since it's supposed to help with the temperature control.  If I weren't planning to use the indirect side at all (like if all I had done was sear the skirt steak) I wouldn't have added the water.  Skirt's so thin (and so delicious when it's charred on the outside and barely medium-rare on the inside) there's not much point in trying to do anything indirect with it.  It seems to me that water would just be soaking up heat in that case.

 

Edit: But to be fair, I'm a noob, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

 

I've got a whole chicken brining right now that I'm going to try to smoke this afternoon with a pan of beans sitting underneath it to catch all the drippings.

Edited by dfitzo53
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you put water in it every time, or just for a smoke?

Just for smoke. There's no need for water in hot & fast cooks.

I put the water in yesterday since it's supposed to help with the temperature control. If I weren't planning to use the indirect side at all (like if all I had done was sear the skirt steak) I wouldn't have added the water. Skirt's so thin (and so delicious when it's charred on the outside and barely medium-rare on the inside) there's not much point in trying to do anything indirect with it. It seems to me that water would just be soaking up heat in that case.

Edit: But to be fair, I'm a noob, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

I've got a whole chicken brining right now that I'm going to try to smoke this afternoon with a pan of beans sitting underneath it to catch all the drippings.

I put the water in yesterday since it's supposed to help with the temperature control. If I weren't planning to use the indirect side at all (like if all I had done was sear the skirt steak) I wouldn't have added the water. Skirt's so thin (and so delicious when it's charred on the outside and barely medium-rare on the inside) there's not much point in trying to do anything indirect with it. It seems to me that water would just be soaking up heat in that case.

Edit: But to be fair, I'm a noob, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

I've got a whole chicken brining right now that I'm going to try to smoke this afternoon with a pan of beans sitting underneath it to catch all the drippings.

I've found that spatch****ed chicken cooks faster, and more evenly, than whole chicken. Turkey is supposed to, but Mrs Skinsfan likes the way a whole turkey looks, at Thanksgiving, before carving.

I have a freebie Turkey the freezer. I'll spatch**** that one, and report back as to how it turned out.

Edited by Skinsfan1311
Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to butcher a chicken first, two legs, thighs, wings, and breasts. This allows me to manipulate the light and dark meat pieces, and most importantly, more surface area to finish over high heat and get that awesome crispy char

If you want to do a whole chicken, follow Thomas keller's roast chicken recipe in the oven. Thank me (well, him) later. All you need is salt, attention to detail, and oven, and a shirt ton of paper towels to thoroughly dry the chicken before roasting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoked chicken came out fantastic today. About 4 hours at 225-245. Nice brown crust on the outside, tender, moist, deeply smoky (applewood) meat on the inside.

The beans needed to be cooked more before going in as the drip pan. Flavor was great, but they were a tad under.

All in all a successful first try.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoked chicken came out fantastic today. About 4 hours at 225-245. Nice brown crust on the outside, tender, moist, deeply smoky (applewood) meat on the inside.

The beans needed to be cooked more before going in as the drip pan. Flavor was great, but they were a tad under.

All in all a successful first try.

I do something similar when cooking a turkey: Fill a pan with chicken stock, onion, celery, rosemary, thyme, s&p. Place a cooling rack on top of the pan. Place the turkey on top of the rack. Slow cook on grill, indirect heat until done. When done, I pour the stock through a fine sieve into a pot, add fresh chopped veggies (shrooms, carrot, onion, celery) and thicken it with roux.

Smoky-turkey-gravy = heaven.  

 

The first time I did this, I was going to put the tray under the grill grate. When I did, I noticed some of the black gunk from under the grill dropped into the chicken stock. Fortunately, I was able to salvage the pan, removed the little bit of black gunk that fell in, & had a successful cook.

 

I'll have to try your beans & chicken - maybe par boil the beans before putting them on the grill to ensure they're done when the chicken is done. Hmmm....now that I think about it, my smoked teriyaki meatloaf would work much better with beans! Thanks!

Edited by GoSkins0721
Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to butcher a chicken first, two legs, thighs, wings, and breasts. This allows me to manipulate the light and dark meat pieces, and most importantly, more surface area to finish over high heat and get that awesome crispy char

If you want to do a whole chicken, follow Thomas keller's roast chicken recipe in the oven. Thank me (well, him) later. All you need is salt, attention to detail, and oven, and a shirt ton of paper towels to thoroughly dry the chicken before roasting.

I prefer "Mexican Roadside Chicken". OMG. I make it with whole chickens or Cornish hens that are butterflied and grilled for about an hour. So good. Marinated with OJ.

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/08/grilling-mexican-roadside-chicken-with-green.html

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I personally prefer to butterfly a chicken if I'm smoking or roasting a whole one. I'll typically do that, season with some season salt, pepper, and a few others depending on the flavor I'm looking for and smoke for about 4-4.5hrs at around 225. Love it.

 

Looks like I'm going to luck out. I have a birthday coming up and my mom asked if I'd like a new grill for my bday. Looks like a new charcoal grill with the smoker sidecar for this guy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing with chicken, i don't think enough emphasis is placed on the quality of the bird. It is 90 percent of the cook IMO

We have a farmer here locally that sells fresh chickens. They are tiny... That's how you know they are high quality. If I have to buy at a supermarket I always spend a little extra and buy organic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing with chicken, i don't think enough emphasis is placed on the quality of the bird. It is 90 percent of the cook IMO

We have a farmer here locally that sells fresh chickens. They are tiny... That's how you know they are high quality. If I have to buy at a supermarket I always spend a little extra and buy organic.

 

I have my feelings about the whole organic vs conventional foods thing. At least in a general sense or a broad scale. But with something like this I could see the appeal. Sometimes you really can find a better quality bird on that side of the cooler. Bigger isn't always better. With boneless chicken breast, I don't mind so much depending on what I'm making. But if I'm roasting a whole bird, it does make a difference in the flavor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my feelings about the whole organic vs conventional foods thing. At least in a general sense or a broad scale. But with something like this I could see the appeal. Sometimes you really can find a better quality bird on that side of the cooler. Bigger isn't always better. With boneless chicken breast, I don't mind so much depending on what I'm making. But if I'm roasting a whole bird, it does make a difference in the flavor.

I'm the first to say that the organic food movement is 95% bull****. But it does make a difference in chicken, probably more so than any other product in the store

Though I suspect the quality has more to do with other factors besides "organic"

The chickens we get from the farmer are on another level entirely. Indescribably good...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt about chickens.  The ones I get at the grocery store here are almost inedible these days. Freakishly big breasts (kinda like 90's porn).  

 

When we go to Mexico we always stop at the yellow chicken place on the way.  Those scrawny little chickens they have are so delicious in comparison.  No way are they organic either.

Edited by KAOSkins
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the first to say that the organic food movement is 95% bull****. But it does make a difference in chicken, probably more so than any other product in the store

Though I suspect the quality has more to do with other factors besides "organic"

The chickens we get from the farmer are on another level entirely. Indescribably good...

When you have to inject the bird with a brine solution at the "factory" you know its not nearly as good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do something similar when cooking a turkey: Fill a pan with chicken stock, onion, celery, rosemary, thyme, s&p. Place a cooling rack on top of the pan. Place the turkey on top of the rack. Slow cook on grill, indirect heat until done. When done, I pour the stock through a fine sieve into a pot, add fresh chopped veggies (shrooms, carrot, onion, celery) and thicken it with roux.

Smoky-turkey-gravy = heaven.  

 

The first time I did this, I was going to put the tray under the grill grate. When I did, I noticed some of the black gunk from under the grill dropped into the chicken stock. Fortunately, I was able to salvage the pan, removed the little bit of black gunk that fell in, & had a successful cook.

 

I'll have to try your beans & chicken - maybe par boil the beans before putting them on the grill to ensure they're done when the chicken is done. Hmmm....now that I think about it, my smoked teriyaki meatloaf would work much better with beans! Thanks!

Well I had the beans running in the slow cooker on high for about 3 hours before I put them on the grill.  In my experience 5 hours in the slow cooker is usually about right for a bag of black beans.  I thought 3 in the crock pot + 4 on the grill would be enough, but I was wrong.  The temp down underneath the cooking grate across from the slow+sear is significantly lower, definitely below 200 degrees.  I think what you have to do is basically cook the beans just about all the way, and then just let them keep warm and absorb smokiness and drippings.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I had the beans running in the slow cooker on high for about 3 hours before I put them on the grill.  In my experience 5 hours in the slow cooker is usually about right for a bag of black beans.  I thought 3 in the crock pot + 4 on the grill would be enough, but I was wrong.  The temp down underneath the cooking grate across from the slow+sear is significantly lower, definitely below 200 degrees.  I think what you have to do is basically cook the beans just about all the way, and then just let them keep warm and absorb smokiness and drippings.

Instead of that, this is what I normally do for beans. The next time you fix some bacon, just pour the fat into a ramekin or something and stick it in the fridge. When its time for beans, scoop some out and put in it. Tastes great. Plus I'm not sure about poultry drippings that may not be at temp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Instead of that, this is what I normally do for beans. The next time you fix some bacon, just pour the fat into a ramekin or something and stick it in the fridge. When its time for beans, scoop some out and put in it. Tastes great. Plus I'm not sure about poultry drippings that may not be at temp.

 

How long does the fat/oil typically hold up? I always hate throwing away a pan of bacon grease that I know could be used again for cooking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How long does the fat/oil typically hold up? I always hate throwing away a pan of bacon grease that I know could be used again for cooking.

I keep it in the fridge for over a month. More than that, I just freeze it. My grandma used to keep it on the back of the stove to add to everything such as green beans.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Grease lasts for a while.

I'm not that worried about the temp. I'll check it with the thermometer to be sure next time, but I would bet dollars to doughnuts it was sitting at or above 150 for the 4 hours. That's more than plenty to kill the bad guys. The beans were hot, they just weren't boiling.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep it in the fridge for over a month. More than that, I just freeze it. My grandma used to keep it on the back of the stove to add to everything such as green beans.

 

Yeah, I tend to keep it by the sink at room temp as of now. I'd just rather be safe than sorry if I want to keep it around a while so I'll probably just throw it in the fridge after it cools.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...