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    • By JimmiJo in ES Coverage
         0
      VICTORY!!!
       
      Redskins 23 - 17 Panthers
       
      Will the real Washington Redskins please stand up?
       
      Hello friends, JimmiJo here, joined by the Spaceman Spiff. 
       
      Seriously, which team will we get to see today. The one solid in all quarters, playing fundamentally sound ball and making us believe that just maybe, this year they could be hanging around at playoff time? Or will it be the one who decides not all receivers should be covered? You know, the one that seems to believe no national embarrassment is too great to suffer.
       
      If I am on this team on this day, I am playing like I have been punked-out on national TV (because I was) and I have something to prove. I am playing with a degree of urgency yet to be seen this year. I am playing like the season is on the line today. Because it literally is as far as I am concerned.
       
      Speak amongst yourselves...
       
      inactives
       
      The Redskins declared the following players as inactive:
      o   No. 25 RB Chris Thompson
      o   No. 30 S Troy Apke
      o   No. 39 CB Adonis Alexander
      o   No. 74 T Geron Christian Sr.
      o   No. 77 G Shawn Lauvao
      o   No. 80 WR Jamison Crowder
      o   No. 99 DL Caleb Brantley
       
      Ok gang, showtime. Here's to a good game with no injuries. You can follow me live on Twitter @Skinscast. 
       
      See you at the half.
       
      Half
       
      Great start, poor ending. They need to produce in the 2nd half to win.
       
      JimmiJo
       
      This team is consistently inconsistent.
       
      I’m just glad I caught them on the good week. And if there was ever a time to go for two in a row, it’s this week.
       
      I was poised to ask the players how much last week had to do with this. I didn’t have to. Most of the guys I interviewed spoke about getting the bad taste of last week out of their mouth.
       
      To a man they wanted to put it behind them. No better way than to do so with a win against a 3-1 Carolina Panthers. The win preserves Washington’s first place position in the division.
       
      If we are looking for heroes we have to start with Adrian Peterson. Coming in with multiple injuries (shoulder, knee, ankle), all he did was run for 97-yards on 17-carries with a 5.7 yard per carry average. The man is ageless, looking more like a first-year back rather than a guy near the end of his career.
       
      On the other side of the ball was Josh Norman. It was clear in speaking to him following the game that the chatter in the media was starting to get to him. This game was important enough for him that he called a defensive backs meeting this week to get everybody on the same page.
       
      Norman payed like the all-star the Redskins signed in 2016. In fact, the interception was his first since week 16 of 2016. But he wasn’t done. Norman punched out the ball to force a fumble later on a critical drive, robbing the Panthers of an opportunity to score.
       
      Given the talk about Norman and the manner in which the New Orleans Saints bludgeoned Washington last week, it was fitting the game came down to a defensive stand that resulted in Carolina giving up the ball on downs.
       
      This was a total team effort for Washington, with all areas contributing.
       
      Alex Smith went 21-of-36 for 163-yards and two touchdowns. He finished with a passer-rating of 88.1.
       
      Jordan Reed had a relatively quiet five receptions for 36-yards to lead the receivers. Vernon Davis on the other hand, made some noise bringing in 3-receptions for 48-yards to include a beautiful touchdown grab on a seam route that left him largely uncovered.
       
      Smith did such a good job of looking off the safety that by the time he turned back to fire down field, Davis was running free and clear into the end zone.
       
      Another hero on the day was Dustin Hopkins. All he did was kick a 6-yard field goal, the longest of his career. I asked the coach if he had discussed the kick with Hopkins prior to making the decision. Gruden told me it was special teams coach Ben Kotwica who proclaimed Hopkins ready.
       
      “I thought it was a 53-yarder,” said Gruden. “When I heard it was a 56-yarder I thought about calling a timeout.
      He didn’t and Hopkins made him look smart.
       
      The Redskins fare best when they score first. They must be aware of this as they started red hot, jumping out to a 17-point lead before the Panthers got off the snide.
       
      A total of 9-unanswered points later, Washington scored early in the fourth quarter to bring the lead back to 11. That lasted officially 1-drive, as the Panthers marched down with relative ease to score a touchdown and bring the game within 3.
       
      Washington then mounted another drive to register another field goal to take the lead back to 6.
       
      Then a defensive stand was needed.
       
      Carolina was able to move the back to the midfield with relative ease. Washington tightened up and it all came down to a 4th-and-5 at the Redskins 16 with 38-seconds remaining.
       
      That was as far as they would go as Cam Newton skimmed the ball off of the field for a harmless incomplete.
       
      It was a much need win. It keeps the Redskins in 1st place in the division at 3-2 with Dallas coming to town next Sunday.
       
      What’s not to like?  

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Tarhog

Tarhog & TK-IV II I's Redskin's History 101: Sammy Baugh

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Tarhog & TK-IV II I's
Redskin's History 101:
Legends of Lore: Slingin’ Sammy Baugh!

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Samuel Adrian Baugh was born on March 17th, 1914 in the backyard of the enemy, in Temple, Texas. The son of a railroad worker, young Sammy Baugh spent countless hours throwing his favorite projectile through a tire he’d suspended from a tree. When he grew tired of it, Sammy would set the tire swing in motion, and practice hitting the sweet spot as it made its wide elusive arcs. When he’d mastered that, he’d practice hitting the moving tire on the run. Sammy Baugh grew up to be a quarterback. And what a quarterback he’d be.

When Sammy turned 16, his family packed up and moved to Swee****er, Texas. It was there that Baugh played his first organized football, and excelled at any number of sports. Ironically, it was his baseball skills that netted him a scholarship at Texas Christian University and the nickname ‘Slingin’ Sammy’. Sammy was the consummate athlete, playing baseball and basketball for the university, but it was his prowess with the football which was to earn him fame.

In 1936, Sammy’s junior year, he put TCU on the college football map. Led by Baugh’s rifle arm and heady athleticism, the Horned Frogs went undefeated through their first 10 games, and went on to win the Sugar Bowl 3-2 over LSU. Baugh made his mark not only as a quarterback, but was a fine defensive back, and punter. In the 1936 Sugar Bowl, Baugh picked off two passes, punted the ball 14 times averaging 48 yds per kick, and reeled off a 44 yard scramble to seal the win.

Baugh’s senior campaign was even more impressive as he led the Frogs to a 16-6 Cotton Bowl win over Marquette. Baugh was so dominant in the game, his coach Dutch Meyers sat him for the final quarter to avoid ‘embarrassing’ the opponent further. Baugh finished out an impressive collegiate career having completed 285 of 597 passes for 3,471 yards and 39 touchdowns.

Coach Meyers was to impart many enduring lessons to Baugh, instilling in him an appreciation for the short to mid-range passing attack. ‘Anyone can throw it long and miss’ was Meyer’s philosophy, but the secret to a feared attack was mixing the run with a brutally accurate short passing attack. And Baugh was his guy. Meyers served as Baugh’s baseball coach in addition to his football duties, and would later coach another NFL great, quarterback Davey O’Brien.

In the 1937 NFL Draft, five teams would pass by Sammy Baugh, despite his All-American credentials. They would rue the day. George Preston Marshall, owner of the Washington Redskins and Coach Ray Flaherty knew a diamond in the rough when they saw one. Having just moved the Redskins from Boston, they arrived in Washington DC and drafted Baugh, signing him to a 1 year contract for $8,000, making him the highest-paid player on his team. Baugh was no braggart, but he had a quiet confidence obvious to his teammates. At his first Redskins practice, Coach Ray Flaherty reportedly told Baugh ‘Let’s see you hit that receiver in the eye’. Baugh calmly replied ‘Which eye?’

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Sammy’s first play in a Redskin uniform was a 30 yard kickoff return at Griffith Stadium. Amazingly, in his rookie season the 6’2”, 180 lb rookie quarterback led his new team all the way to the NFL Championship game. There, on a brutally frigid and wind-swept Wrigley Field, Baugh put on a passing clinic. In an NFL where passing was viewed as a novelty and was endorsed grudgingly, Sammy made believers out of all who watched that day. Passing for 335 yards and completing 17 of 33 passes including touchdown passes of 55, 78, and 33 yards, Baugh led his fledgling team to a 28-21 victory.

baugh2.JPG

Baugh briefly flirted with his childhood dream of being a professional baseball player. He was signed to play for the farm team of the St. Louis Cardinals, but quickly found he lacked the hitting skills to make a go of it. And back to football he came, pausing briefly to marry his childhood sweetheart Edmonia Smith, with whom he would have 5 children.

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Baugh and the Redskins would meet their nemesis the Chicago Bears three more times in championship games in the early 1940’s, including suffering a now infamous 73-0 drubbing. Following that game, Baugh was asked if one of his passes dropped in the end zone on the Redskin’s first drive might have changed the game. Baugh replied wryly ‘Yeah. It would’ve been 73-7’ Baugh had better luck in 1942 when he again led his Redskins to a 14-6 NFL Championship victory against the Bears, throwing a touchdown pass and kicking an 85 yd punt.

In 1943, Sammy Baugh led the league in interceptions (he picked off opponents 11 times), punting (averaging 46 yds per kick), and passing, but lost to the Bears in the championship after Baugh was knocked from the game with a concussion. Despite these early successes, Baugh didn’t hit his stride until the 1945 season when the Redskins switched to the ‘T formation’. It was only then that Sammy himself began calling the offensive plays. That year, Baugh finished the season with a 70.33 completion percentage, a record that held for many years.

Baugh changed what it was to quarterback in the National Football League forever. Prior to his arrival on the scene, the forward pass was seen as only a trick or gimmick, something you did on 3rd down when you had no other choice. Baugh threw passes on every down, and he changed the course of the NFL forever. His exciting play and prolific arm made him a star, and in 1941, Sammy even showed up on the silver screen when he starred as ‘Tom King Jr.’ in Republic Studio’s ‘King of the Texas Rangers’, a popular western serial.

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Baugh played proficiently for another 5 years, finally retiring in 1952. He led the NFL in passing 6 of the 16 years he played, held the highest punt average four times, and led the league in interceptions once. He remains the only player to lead the league in an offensive, defensive, and special teams category. Over the course of his career, #33 completed 1,695 of 2,995 passes for an incredible 21,886 yards and 187 touchdowns in addition to rushing for an additional nine more. In addition to the two NFL championships, Baugh led the Redskins to 5 NFL East titles during his first 10 years with the

team.

One of ‘Slingin’ Sammy’s’ best memories came on November 23rd, 1947, when the Washington Touchdown Club sponsored ‘Sammy Baugh Day’ at the Redskins game vs. the eventual NFL champs that year, the Chicago Cardinals. After receiving a gift, a brand new maroon station wagon, from the fans, Baugh returned the favor, blistering the Cardinals for six touchdowns and defeating them 45-21.

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His playing days done, Sammy turned to coaching, first at the college level, and then as the first coach of the New York Titans (later to become the Jets). In 1962, Sammy served briefly as the coach of the Houston Oilers. In 1963, Sammy Baugh was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

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Videography

Sammy in the 1937 NFC Championship Game

Sammy in the 1942 NFC Championship Game

Sammy Comes to DC!

See Sammy Sling!

TD Sammy Baugh!

Another TD Throw From Slingin' Sammy!

Sammy, the Elder Statesmen

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I want to be the first to compliment TK and TH on this excellent article! The good news is that they have already signed on to bring you guys more of these articles on various Redskins greats throughout the history of our team as the offseason rolls on. (I got a killer bargain on thier signing bonus;))

:cheers: to both of you for this excellent read!

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Originally posted by Tarhog

I believe he turned 91 today. Happy Birthday Mr. Baugh!

Cool! I heard all of the shout-outs but thought it was being thrown out there posthumously.

Thanks. Happy B-day Sammy!

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Awesome! Thank you! :notworthy:

Seems like he really revolutionized the sport, huh? The forward pass used to be a "gimmick" :laugh:

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week3_baughhope.jpg

Sammy posed with entertainer Bob Hope when the Redskins visited the set of "The Lemon Drop Kid".

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Excellent job, TK! Thanks for reminding us that the Redskins' Tradition goes a looong way back.

(The off-season cries for more PBS/History Channel threads.)

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Originally posted by Kevin West

Excellent job, TK! Thanks for reminding us that the Redskins' Tradition goes a looong way back.

(The off-season cries for more PBS/History Channel threads.)

Guys, this one was about 95% Tarhog.

He had the thing damn near in the can & ready to go when he approached me with it. The only thing I had to with it was the book graphic that's on the front page.

I believe the plan is for us to do these on a monthly basis. That is, if you guys really like them. Hopefully you will, as we've already got the next three planned out. If not, just lie to us & tell us you like 'em. :D

We truely hope that you guys have as much fun with these pieces as we have putting them together. I was already doing the research the other day for the follow up piece to Sammy's & was still finding new stuff on Sammy.

Being a part of this with Tarhog has been an absolute blast. Amazingly, we've been on the same page with this, at points it was starting to get scary. :laugh:

John, I thank you for inviting me to be a part of this with you.

:cheers:

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In 1998, I was sittin' here watching the Vikings on TV when they lined up in the Single Wing for a few plays. Gawdalmighty, my dentures about fell out.

Can anyone recount this series of plays? I'm very curious what sort of situation would cause any modern NFL team to break out the Single wing. I was always under the impression that it was way too slow for the modern game.

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Originally posted by TK-IV II I

Guys this one was about 95% Tarhog.

He had the thing damn near in the can & ready to go when he approached me with it. The only thing I had to with it was the book graphic that's on the front page.

I believe the plan is for us to do these on a monthly basis. That is, if you guys really like them. Hopefully you will, as we've already got the next three planned out.

We truely hope that you guys have as much fun with these pieces as we have putting them together. I was already do the research the other day for the follow up piece to Sammy's & was still finding new stuff on Sammy.

Being a part of this with Tarhog has been an absolute blast. Amazingly, we've been on the same page with this, at points it was starting to get scary. :laugh:

John, I thank you for inviting me to be a part of this with you.

:cheers:

Can we do the next one on Billy Killmer ?

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We're really excited to bring these to you. Over and over we've heard a lot of posters talk about the past, as if it was just a rerun on TV. Thing is, these players were real, flesh and blood, and fought and scrapped and made Redskin's history. And many of them, we barely know. TK and I will be meeting each of them, snatching them off the Redskin's supply room shelf, blowing off the dust, applying a little spit and polish, and presenting them here for you guys to honor.

And we're not just going to talk about Redskin's greats (some well-known, some obscure), we're going to show them to you in action.

We may have a few surprises in store too :)

And TK? Well he's just being modest. He makes a helluva bourbon and coke. ;)

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Originally posted by pez

Can we do the next one on Billy Killmer ?

I imagine he'll show up at some point : ) We're already working on our next mystery guest.

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Originally posted by pez

Can we do the next one on Billy Killmer ?

He's not up next, we'll get to him in due time. Who's up next? Only Tarhog & I know & I'm not tellin.

:)

Don't go looking for Riggo, O.D.G., Monk, Clark, Joey T. or the like anytime soon. It's not that we won't cover them. It's that there's more then enough out there on those guys.

We're going after no name, before some of you guys' time, blue collar, lunch pail guys. And we're going to have a blast doing it. Hopefully, you guys will look forward reading these as much as we look forward to releasing them for you.

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Originally posted by Tarhog

And TK? Well he's just being modest. He makes a helluva bourbon and coke. ;)

Worn one lately?

;)

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