theTruthTeller

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About theTruthTeller

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  • Birthday 05/23/1957

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  1. Here's a good article that ranks every QB draft class since 2000. So few prospects end up being good, even first rounders. http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000810915/article/ranking-this-millenniums-17-quarterback-draft-classes
  2. Yes. Carr gets a benefit of 23.8 over signing next year- you say to agree on that. He'll make an additional $23.8M over his career - you say you agree to that. That value is coming from this contract. If you prorate that over the term of the contract, that's an additional 4.8M/year on top of his $25M/year prorated salary. The contract pays $125M by the end of 2021; but for the contract he'd make $101M. That's why I said "effectively". The team is letting him out of his rookie contract, the Raiders don't have to, its worth money to Carr, and its easy to compute how much money its worth. $23.8M. I've answered your questions about 3 times now, please answer these: 1) How much is a contract that pays out $125M over five years worth to Player A who just finished his rookie contract, on a yearly basis? 2) How much is a contract that pays out $125M over five years worth to Player B who has one year at $1M left on his rookie contract, on a yearly basis? 3) If your answer to 2 and 3 are the same, why does Player B accrue $24M more than Player A for each year of his career? What do you attribute that money to? Black Magic? The Raiders will have $24M less in cap space because they are paying $25M instead of 1M by getting rid of his contractual obligation to play for $1M in 2017. Whether it all happens this year or not depends upon how they structure the salaries and bonuses. He'll pay more in taxes, too, because he's making more money. Over his career he'll pay taxes on approximately $24M more revenue. It's not a side deal. It's getting a raise when you are contractually bound to a lower salary. I'll ask you the same question that Goskins wouldn't answer: You are under contract to make $100,000 a year for four years and your boss said that he was giving you a raise to $2.4M per year, He asks you do you want the raise to start now or a year from now. What's your answer? What is it worth to you to start now rather than a year from now? Congrats - you convinced me. Not that your right, but that your logical skills are poor.
  3. Accrued Earnings (NK= prorated value of his subsequent contract) Signs now Signs in 2018 Diff 2017: 25M 1M 24M 2018: 50M 26M 24M 2019: 75M 51M 24M 2020: 100M 76M 24M 2021: 125M 101M 24M 2022: 125M+NK 126M NK-1 2023: 125M+2*NK 126M+NK NK-1 Unless signing the current offer causes Carr to retire a year early, he'll always be about one year ahead in salary by signing this year, because he got rid of the last year of his rookie contract. So he will make approximately $24M ahead by signing a contract this year. That benefit is entirely due to the contract he signs this year while he's making only $1M. If he holds out a year, it goes away. Let's say that his agent tells him that he's worth $26M a year and he should hold out to next year to get that much. Do you think that would be a good deal?
  4. Let's say you make $100,000 per year and it's contractual. You have one year left on your contract. You've done a great job and your boss says "We're going to give you a raise to $1M per year, would you like to start now or a year from now?" Which would you take? The $23.8M is not in the $125M. It's a benefit that allows you to make $23.8M over your career. It's only available if you sign the contract while you are still under your rookie contract. If you really think its in the $125M, let me know how the player ends up making 23.8 during his career. Everyone seems to agree on this point. That $23,8 has to come from somewhere.
  5. That's easy, I'm right. But I'm dying to get to 2000 posts, so maybe Cali will keep it up.
  6. At this point, I know that you either understand that the contract puts an additional $24M in his pocket because it releases Carr from a contractual obligation to play for $1M in 2017, or that you are incapable of using logic. Based on your previous posts, I think its the former, but feel free convince me otherwise by continuing to fight this losing battle.
  7. You're joking, right? He has another $25M, or more, coming to him in 2022 if he signs the LTD this year as well. Signing an LTD this year isn't going shorten his career. The additional benefit provided by replacing the last year of the rookie contract is true starts from the day he signs his contract and continues until the end of his career. It's always a $24M benefit, even if he gets hit by a bus leaving his meeting to sign the contract. He ONLY gets the benefit if he signs a contract being offered this year, so any benefit, Subsequent contracts in his career won't be replacing the final year of his rookie contract. That's why the benefit only accrues to this contract.
  8. I'm not saying anything about the Skins at all. I certainly wouldn't have expected them to sign Cousins to a big boy LTD after his third year. I'm just saying that Carr is getting a better deal than the $25M/year reported since one of those $25M years is replacing a the last year (1M) of his rookie contract. I think its a great contract for him, assuming this is all for real. I don't know if this helps Cousins, because he's really not considered in the same strata as Carr is right now. On the other hand, Cousins will be 29 at the start of the 2017 and if he remains on the tag, he'll be 30 before he gets a LTD. I fully understand why he is pushing hard to get the best deal possible. I hope it works out for him.
  9. 1. Without signing the contract, he is due to make $1M this year (I'm rounding off now) 2. If he does sign the contract, he'll make $25M this year (prorated, he'll likely make more this year) 3. If he signs next year, he'll make something on the order of $25M/year, maybe a little more, but I'm going to ignore that 4. By the end of 5 years, i.e., by the end of the 2021 season, he'll make $24M more by signing this year (If you want to argue that he'll make more by waiting next year, you can say $22M instead) than he would if the Raiders waited until the end of his rookie contract to re-sign him. 5. 24/5=4.8 per year additional benefit if he signs this year, rather than waiting until the end of his rookie contract. 6. So if you say his contract is worth $25M/year, you are neglecting this benefit. He is effectively making $29.8 relative to a quarterback who received a new contract after his rookie contract expired.
  10. Who is Bill Mitchell? In any case, I don't see how that makes sense. On the other hand, I question how you cannot see that replacing a $1M year with a $25M year is a $24M benefit. It's costing the Raiders $24M that they are not currently contractually obligated to pay and putting the $24M directly in Derek Carr's pocket. If you were David Carr, would you rather start making $25M a year this year or next year?
  11. Your equation, ignoring the errant order of operations, comes out to less than $25M per year. Are you saying that he's making less than $25M per season because the Raiders are paying him $23,8 more than they are contractually obligated to this season? If your employer offered to pay you an extra $23.8M this year, would you consider that a good thing or a bad thing?
  12. Oakland doesn't need to offer him a contract at all until next year. It's a pretty good deal, assuming he has a $15M bonus or thereabouts, he is probably going to see about $30M a year ahead of time.
  13. Let me do the math for you: (25*5+23.8)/5 = 29.76 Sorry I was off by a little bit.