Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

Velvet Revolver aim to shake up boring landscape of rock music


Commander PK

Recommended Posts

I can't wait for this album. Rock is slowly, but surely making it's comeback!

Velvet Revolver aim to shake up boring landscape of rock music

Fri May 21, 4:24 PM ET

ANGELA PACIENZA

TORONTO (CP) - The bad days of rock are back.

So say the members of Velvet Revolver, a who's-who of modern day rock legends, including crowd-pleasing guitarist Slash from Guns N' Roses. In typical bad-boy fashion, the quintet - also including ex-Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland (news), former G N' R members bassist Duff McKagan (news) and drummer Matt Sorum, and Dave Kushner, who once played guitar with Dave Navarro (news)'s band and Wasted Youth - showed up late to a news conference Friday, and chain-smoked their way through 45 minutes of Q&As, using enough curse words to render half their comments unusable to most media outlets.

"It's fast. It's ferocious. It's like drinking lightning in a bottle," said Weiland, dressed like a superstar in dark aviator glasses, black velvet hat and white scarf.

Velvet Revolver was in Toronto to play a sold-out show Friday night previewing material from their upcoming record, Contraband.

"This album has the utmost potential . . . to be influential, to explode and be a massive album just like the Pixies were," said Weiland, who at one point threatened to walk out should reporters ask about his notorious drug addiction and police arrests.

The group has reason to be ****y. It has been greeted with open arms, with many critics hailing the quintet a "supergroup." As well, the first single Slither is quickly climbing the radio and video charts and their shows have all sold out in minutes.

Their reasoning for all the attention is that young people are once again interested in true rock 'n' roll bands, complete with the rough-and-tumble attitudes and un-boyband looks.

McKagan said while he was going back to school a couple of years ago, fellow students often said they felt ripped off by the current landscape of bands.

"They'd say, 'Our generation doesn't have a rock band. We don't have rock 'n' roll.' They're buying records that are 20 years old," he said.

"There's a whole new young generation that's just starving for something that's pure and unadulterated."

The blame, McKagan said, lies with the mega-mergers of media corporations that started in the mid 1990s.

"With the advent of these mergers these labels were all owned by a huge umbrella corporation of stock holders. That in turn made all these pop paint-by-numbers garbage (groups). That's what was spoonfed to a whole generation. There will be revolt at some point and there will be change."

He signalled out Nickelback and Creed as two bands that offer audiences no passion.

"Rock 'n' roll is about a sense of freedom," added Slash. "When the corporate (people) get a hold of it, it becomes very contained, very predictable. It loses its human edge."

Velvet Revolver formed in 2002 after Slash, McKagan and Sorum banded to perform a benefit show for their late friend Randy Castillo (news), a former drummer for Ozzy Osbourne. Kushner, a high school friend of Slash's, joined shortly after.

Weiland, who has struggled with drug addictions for years, was recruited as the vocalist after a 10-month search.

All members described their union as the best thing that's come along since they formed their first bands as teens.

Weiland likened it to a "virgin experience," except they each "know what we did wrong in the past and we know how to avoid certain pitfalls."

Slash said it was never about money or fame.

"It's been purely about the music. . . . It's hard for people to fathom that. This thing came together organically."

As the band prepared to leave the room, Slash promised rock fans a return to roots.

"Guitar solos are back," he said with a grin through his long, curly mane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw them at the 9:30 Club last week and the show ROCKED.

They played a lot of new songs and I'm not sure how I feel about them, but I have only heard those songs once.

But they really put on a great show. They covered Mr. Brownstone, Used to Love Her, It's So Easy, and Sex Type Thing as well as a Nirvana song (the name escapes me right now).

Scott Weiland really had great stage presence, and moved around almost like Mick Jagger does. The rest of the bad seemed really tight and Slash provided his share of solos. I'll be interested to hear the new album. I DO think the band would be a little better off with Izzy. A lot of people credit him with being as vital as Axl to the success of Guns.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Ancalagon the Black

Oh yeah, that was you. :)

Maybe Slash can stay sober on stage this time. I always thought Duff was an underrated bassist. Matt Sorum is a kick-ass drummer. I don't know about SW on vocals, though.

Well, Weiland is at least head and shoulders above the gawd-awful Axl!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's great to have slash back on the radio intoxicating millions with his unique attention grabbing solos. Sadly I'm not a big Scott Weiland fan, his singing is not level with this bands musical ability and I find myself wishing he'd stfu so I could better hear the rest of the band. Also you have to wonder how long this band will survive with this crackhead at the front.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sure the album probably rocks, and Slash is a great guitarist, but man...I was sick of hearing about this band before the first single ever came out. Their hype machine had been unbelievable.

And that video - ugh. I really don't need Scott Weiland's emaciated leather-pants clad groin gyrating in my face for three minutes. Or three seconds for that matter.

Sorry, I know it's a positive-vibe kinda thread, but I had to get that off my chest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Mufumonk

I dl'd the album off of Suprnova.org yesterday. It's awesome. Very STP/AiC sounding, with some GnR guitar work thrown in. And Weiland has always had an amazing stage presence.

I got the same feeling about slither. It sounded like STP in the begining and when Slash came in with the solo you could hear GnR influence big time! Sounded great!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Destino

It's great to have slash back on the radio intoxicating millions with his unique attention grabbing solos. Sadly I'm not a big Scott Weiland fan, his singing is not level with this bands musical ability and I find myself wishing he'd stfu so I could better hear the rest of the band. Also you have to wonder how long this band will survive with this crackhead at the front.

Destino,

Weiland is a junkie not a crackhead!:laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Rolling Stone review just came out this morning:

http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/album?id=6072850&pageid=rs.Home&pageregion=triple1

**** (4 Stars/5)

Before you start cracking wise about out-of-work refugees from multiplatinum bands or rock stars with drug problems and arrest records -- as if we haven't seen a few of them in the last half-century -- consider this: Singer Scott Weiland, late of Stone Temple Pilots, and the ex-Guns n' Roses trio of guitarist Slash, bassist Duff McKagan and drummer Matt Sorum have, with second guitarist Dave Kushner, gotten more done in one year as Velvet Revolver than Axl Rose has achieved with his version of G n' R in the past decade. If nothing else, banging your head to Contraband's snarling update of Eighties Sunset Strip rock classicism is a lot better than laying around waiting for the mythical Chinese Democracy.

Contraband is, in fact, tighter and hotter in construction and attack than we had any right to expect from a band that started out auditioning vocalists while being filmed for a VH1 reality show. Weiland and the emeritus Gunners are not shy about flashing pedigree: "Sucker Train Blues" opens the album with zooming-underwater bass, pneumatic gallop and flying chunks of superfuzz guitar -- Appetite for Destruction in miniature -- while Weiland pulls out his police-bullhorn-style bark from STP's "Sex Type Thing." But the chorus harmonies are closer to dirty Def Leppard, and Weiland's searing, monotonic chant - more evil monk than howling wolf - takes you right to the center of his very public hell: "Brain and body melting while there's roaches multiplying/It's the alien infection, it's the coming of Christ." For a guy routinely lampooned as a walking rehab failure, Weiland nails the sweet selfish oblivion and dumb-ass self-destruction of addiction with explosive clarity and no jive excuses.

The déjèvu keeps on comin' throughout the next twelve tracks: Slash's high, strangled fills in "Do It for the Kids" and his reprise of the soprano-hiccup lick from "Sweet Child o' Mine" in "Fall to Pieces"; the tumbling growl of McKagan's bass and Sorum's hammering pulse in "Big Machine"; the full-on Stone Temple Roses of "Slither." But whereas Axl Rose now runs a G n' R that plays the old numbers like a repertory orchestra - and not enough of Democracy to prove that the album even exists -- Velvet Revolver energize their combined histories with original snort (the skewed skittering riff in "Set Me Free") and punchy vocal choruses. Weiland, in particular, shows that he is far more than the sum of his court appearances and star-crossed years with STP. His grainy yowl -- which, at the height of Seattle rock, earned Weiland a lot of lazy, cruel comparisons to Eddie Vedder -- is actually a precision instrument that cuts through Slash and Kushner's dense crossfire with a steely melodic purpose that, when Weiland piles up the harmonies in the choruses, sounds like sour, seething Queen.

Personally, I don't have a lot of patience for power ballads -- they are invariably more sap than nectar -- and Contraband stumbles when the tempo slows and Weiland switches from buggin' out to soft beggin'. And, yes, if I had my way, we'd be getting a real G n' R follow-up to the Use Your Illusion twins, and STP would now be making good on the interrupted promise of their recent best-of, Thank You. But we have Contraband instead, and it is a rare, fine thing: the sound of the perfect A&R sales pitch turning into a real band. Now we find out if these guys can stay together, and go somewhere new.

DAVID FRICKE

(Posted Jun 24, 2004)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...