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The Covid Vaccine Thread


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2 hours ago, TheGreatBuzz said:


You are aware that there are more options than just “layperson” and “expert”, right?  Like I’ve been in the military for 20 years.  I don’t consider myself an expert on military operations but I’m certainly no layperson.

 

1. There is a VAST difference between "I've served in the military for 20 years and now I will give my opinion on military operations" and "I was a pre-med student 30 years ago and now I am going to speak with authority on the safety of mRNA vaccine boosters without citing a reputable source to support my claims".

 

2. I've noted that when you DO speak on matters of the military, you reference publicly available information from reliable sources, and often link it, which is actually the standard I'm hoping people here hold themselves to. We have several posters on this board that actually ARE experts in their respective fields, and they generally provide links to reliable sources to support their claims.

 

3. I've made the point I intended to make. It's clearly come off to some, at least, as condescending, maybe even annoying, but honestly, I don't care. This is an issue of public health, and misinformation is constant. I think we should hold ourselves to a standard of citing reputable sources when making claims on the topic. Even people that know what they're talking about in general can make mistakes, citations help vet those mistakes, and the issue is too important to let things slip.

 

That being noted, with the point made, further exploration of this topic is just likely to cause more hurt feelings without adding anything useful.

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5 hours ago, techboy said:

@Jabbyrwockas a science teacher, I don't know whether to laugh or cry. Probably both.

 

All of it. If you're going to make claims in a public health issue, I don't think it's too much to ask to support them with reliable sources.

 

My wife says I have to get off the internet now, lol. 

image.png.5e10d0008a1262fa646be3db71d68447.png

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@dfitzo53That's exactly the cartoon I was thinking of when I was laughing at the end of that post... We were just sitting down getting ready for dinner, and she's like "Why are you still on your phone?", and I'm like... "I'm having a discussion and I need... Uh..." *Quick log off after slightly embarrassing moment of reflection*

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10 hours ago, techboy said:

 

1. There is a VAST difference between "I've served in the military for 20 years and now I will give my opinion on military operations" and "I was a pre-med student 30 years ago and now I am going to speak with authority on the safety of mRNA vaccine boosters without citing a reputable source to support my claims".

 

2. I've noted that when you DO speak on matters of the military, you reference publicly available information from reliable sources, and often link it, which is actually the standard I'm hoping people here hold themselves to. We have several posters on this board that actually ARE experts in their respective fields, and they generally provide links to reliable sources to support their claims.

 

3. I've made the point I intended to make. It's clearly come off to some, at least, as condescending, maybe even annoying, but honestly, I don't care. This is an issue of public health, and misinformation is constant. I think we should hold ourselves to a standard of citing reputable sources when making claims on the topic. Even people that know what they're talking about in general can make mistakes, citations help vet those mistakes, and the issue is too important to let things slip.

 

That being noted, with the point made, further exploration of this topic is just likely to cause more hurt feelings without adding anything useful.


To be clear, I’m not even necessarily disagreeing with what you’ve said.  But I don’t believe the other poster claimed to be an expert, just to have more knowledge than the average bear.  The way your posts were coming off, to me at least, was that he claimed to be an expert.  I was pointing out that there is a middle ground.

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Rural Hospitals Worry They Will Lose Staff Because Of Biden's New Vaccine Mandate

 

Adam Willmann was born in Goodall-Witcher hospital in Clifton, a small town in central Texas. Now he's its CEO, and he's worried his hospital may have to stop delivering babies.

 

That's because some of the experienced nurses in the Goodall-Witcher obstetrics department aren't vaccinated for COVID-19 and don't intend to be. But under a new federal mandate, hospitals will soon have to require their staff to be vaccinated.

 

"They are also near retirement age and a few of them have already voiced that, 'I will just retire,' " Willmann said. "And then a couple other nurses said, 'Well, I'll just go work for my husband's construction company.' "

 

Willmann's situation is not unique. Rural health providers across the country are sounding alarms about the new mandate that will start as soon as next month. The Biden administration wants every person working in a health care setting — from hospitals to nursing homes to dialysis centers — to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19.

 

But in rural areas where vaccination rates are low and hiring is already difficult, hospital directors are worried there could be staffing shortages that force them to turn patients away.

 

Willmann has been pushing hard to get all of his 250 employees to take one of the COVID-19 vaccines, but staff vaccination has topped out at around 70%. That's well above the rate in the surrounding community, but still not enough.

 

"We're kind of at that point where everybody that's willing to get it, got it," he said.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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Biden doubles US global donation of COVID-19 vaccine shots

 

President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that the United States is doubling its purchase of Pfizer’s COVID-19 shots to share with the world to 1 billion doses as he embraces the goal of vaccinating 70% of the global population within the next year.

 

The stepped-up U.S. commitment marks the cornerstone of the global vaccination summit Biden convened virtually on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly, where he encouraged well-off nations to do more to get the coronavirus under control. It comes as world leaders, aid groups and global health organizations have growing increasingly vocal about the slow pace of global vaccinations and the inequity of access to shots between residents of wealthier and poorer nations.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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I'm vaccinated but it feels like something is wrong the last few days. I honestly feel like I might have caught a variant. It's so selfish of people to avoid vaccination because it keeps the variants alive. Now I'm ****ing sick. 

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4 minutes ago, The Evil Genius said:

Don't eat 2 week old big macs next time, ix. 😁

 

Seriously,  call your doctor and see if you can get a rapid test. Might be able to get something to help the symptoms if positive. 

There's a testing center down the street I'll check with them. But yeah the stupid unvaccinated kept this pandemic going. Now vaccinated people are getting sick. 

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So about the cards -The US and CDC  screwed this up in the start (I dont blame them- I doubted anyone though there would be this kind of push back against the vaccine).

When the vaccines first came out - The CDC literally told agencies and clinics that the cards were NOT going to be used for proof of vaccine. That they were really just appointment reminders (Flip your card over -It literally has a spot to fill out the date / time of your appt for the 2nd shot), and would be a way for the people to simply remember where and what they got for their 1st shot.

 

The CDC actually thought that all shots would be recorded on VAMS.  The issue was VAMS wasn't mandated, and had lots of issues at first so many states and clincs used their own system.

 

I worked a clinc starting last Dec.  The cards were NOT secured at first. In fact -When we ran low CDC just told us to use a copier can make new ones.  The cards were just on the front tables and to be honest -Anyone could have grabbed dozens of them walking by and no one would have blinked. 

 

Hell -because my handwriting is so bad -I had more then a few people fill out everything on their own except the lot number, which they got from the actual vaccinator but even that wasnt automatic at first (My first shot was in Dec and I dont even have the lot number on my card!)

 

In VA (and most states) you can get a actual certificate that shows the info from the state dept. And if you did use VAMS, you can log in and get your own certificate. Many states are also moving to QR codes.

My point was - Fake cards are out there in the ton - because they were never suppose to be the proof and wont last long as the proof.  

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21 minutes ago, TMK9973 said:

So about the cards -The US and CDC  screwed this up in the start (I dont blame them- I doubted anyone though there would be this kind of push back against the vaccine).

When the vaccines first came out - The CDC literally told agencies and clinics that the cards were NOT going to be used for proof of vaccine. That they were really just appointment reminders (Flip your card over -It literally has a spot to fill out the date / time of your appt for the 2nd shot), and would be a way for the people to simply remember where and what they got for their 1st shot.

 

The CDC actually thought that all shots would be recorded on VAMS.  The issue was VAMS wasn't mandated, and had lots of issues at first so many states and clincs used their own system.

 

I worked a clinc starting last Dec.  The cards were NOT secured at first. In fact -When we ran low CDC just told us to use a copier can make new ones.  The cards were just on the front tables and to be honest -Anyone could have grabbed dozens of them walking by and no one would have blinked. 

 

Hell -because my handwriting is so bad -I had more then a few people fill out everything on their own except the lot number, which they got from the actual vaccinator but even that wasnt automatic at first (My first shot was in Dec and I dont even have the lot number on my card!)

 

In VA (and most states) you can get a actual certificate that shows the info from the state dept. And if you did use VAMS, you can log in and get your own certificate. Many states are also moving to QR codes.

My point was - Fake cards are out there in the ton - because they were never suppose to be the proof and wont last long as the proof.  

So...what's the plan for a booster shot (re: tracking via card)? I'm reading they're recommending a booster of Pfizer if you got the J&J vaccine (along with those who got Pfizer & are 65+).

I'll be 65 in January & got the J&J in March. I want to get it now...

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