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So, how do you reopen schools? (Preschool to High School & even College)


Rdskns2000
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11 minutes ago, The Evil Genius said:

That's good news then. My understanding was that kids in general are dirty little heathens. 😄

 

I can't imagine what elementary school teachers are going to have to deal with. Imagine babysitting 30+ kids and trying to ensure they keep their masks on, wash their hands, and socially diatance while not getting exposed by them. 


honestly... it depends on where you are. We have strict policies. 
 

and it turns out wearing a mask isn’t difficult. Neither is social distancing. Evidenced by the fact that children have no problem following these rules under the simple premise of: this is how we stay safe

 

its adults that think they know more than experts or cry about their freedoms when asked to do anything

 

I’m sure our... more southern states maybe have a different situation. 
 

but all cases of staff infections in our area were linked to community spread. 
 

it doesn’t mean it’s perfectly safe. But it does mean what they’re doing is working, and it means it’s time to change the conversation and reevaluate. 

Edited by tshile
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19 minutes ago, The Evil Genius said:

I had thought nationwide the argument against opening all along was that teachers were not getting vaccinations early. My apologies if I was mistaken. 

Well. Depends. It certainly was when we had the trumpers just recklessly demanding it with no nuance or care for facts or details...

 

but they’ve prioritized things in Virginia. They expect 80% of all staff vaccinated before my county returns. Even then it’s a 4 day week with Wednesday to clean, and a slow rollout starting with k-2. The goal is to have everyone back by mid April but it’s subject to change. 
 

 

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I've said this before and I'll say it again...

 

My youngest has been going to preschool everyday since August. Her school has had 2 cases the entire time.

 

My oldest is in an over 3000 person school system with over 800 in her building. They have been in school 2 days a week with virtual the other 3. They have had positive cases, with many of them being students that were fully virtual. There has been ZERO cases of a positive student getting other students or teachers sick and ZERO cases of teachers getting students sick. This idea of a school being a superspreader location is utterly ridiculous. 

 

It just has to be done smartly. If your school administration can't figure that out..then vote them out. 

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Ventilation in Schools and Child Care Programs

 

How to use CDC building recommendations in your setting
Ventilation is one component of maintaining healthy environments, and is an important COVID-19 prevention strategy for schools and child care programs. Wearing a well-fitting, multi-layer mask helps prevent virus particles from entering the air or being breathed in by the person wearing a mask. Good ventilation is another step that can reduce the number of virus particles in the air. Along with other preventive actions, ventilation can reduce the likelihood of spreading disease. Below are ways you can improve ventilation in your school or child care program, whether in a large building or in a home:

 

Click on the link for more

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On 2/22/2021 at 2:35 PM, The Evil Genius said:

 

That's good news then. My understanding was that kids in general are dirty little heathens. 😄

 

I can't imagine what elementary school teachers are going to have to deal with. Imagine babysitting 30+ kids and trying to ensure they keep their masks on, wash their hands, and socially diatance while not getting exposed by them.

Every district is different of course, but keep in mind that most places aren't going to have full classrooms.

 

While we've been virtual our school's administration has been measuring rooms to see how many students can fit in each while still following CDC guidelines. For example, in my room where I normally teach 28, the max I would have when we return is something like 16.

 

Add in that many parents will elect to keep their kids home and that hybrid learning schedules generally break classes up into groups and you have much smaller classes in practice.

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She didn't check his grades/report cards?

 

City student passes 3 classes in four years, ranks near top half of class with 0.13 GPA

 

A shocking discovery out of a Baltimore City high school, where Project Baltimore has found hundreds of students are failing. It’s a school where a student who passed three classes in four years, ranks near the top half of his class with a 0.13 grade point average.

 

Tiffany France thought her son would receive his diploma this coming June. But after four years of high school, France just learned, her 17-year-old must start over. He’s been moved back to ninth grade.

 

“He's stressed and I am too. I told him I'm probably going to start crying. I don't know what to do for him,” France told Project Baltimore. “Why would he do three more years in school? He didn't fail, the school failed him. The school failed at their job. They failed. They failed, that's the problem here. They failed. They failed. He didn't deserve that.”

 

“I'm just assuming that if you are passing, that you have the proper things to go to the next grade and the right grades, you have the right credits,” said France.

 

As we dig deeper into her son’s records, we can see in his first three years at Augusta Fells, he failed 22 classes and was late or absent 272 days. But in those three years, only one teacher requested a parent conference, which France says never happened. No one from the school told France her son was failing and not going to class.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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Loudoun County middle schools and high schools start their hybrid programs tomorrow. Those who opted for it (sounds like only about 25%) will go 2 days per week in person (either Tues/Wed or Thurs/Fri) and 2 days virtual. Monday has been and will continue to be an "asynchronous school day" where they work on assignments, etc. but don't meet with teachers other than office hours. 

 

I'm excited and so are both my kids (6th and 8th grade). 

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  • 1 month later...

‘Parents are powerless’: Students face being held back after a year of remote learning

 

For a year, the Scruggs worked to keep their kids from falling behind as the pandemic forced children to stay home and America’s education system struggled to adjust. The family installed a whiteboard and baby pink desk next to their TV. The coffee table became a receptacle for homework, folders and laminated multiplication tables.

 

Now, the Scruggs and thousands of families like them in Tennessee and more than a dozen other states face a reckoning with how well they succeeded in their new role as substitute teachers. In the coming months, under a new, stricter state policy, if their son doesn’t do well enough on a standardized reading test next year, he could be forced to repeat a grade.

 

Tennessee’s new law, enacted during a rushed statehouse voting session in January, dictates that if a third-grade student cannot read at grade level as measured by standardized tests, they will be held back until they can. The retention bill was one of several education measures fast-tracked with the support of Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee in an attempt to respond to Covid-related learning loss.

 

So-called third grade reading laws were already the subject of fierce debate in education circles before the pandemic. But while the coronavirus raged, despite near-heroic efforts by teachers who converted their lesson plans for remote learning and parents like the Scruggs, who made their kids’ learning a priority, nearly all students in the United States have fallen behind. Some estimates suggest many — if not most — are now a year or more behind in reading and math.

 

Thousands, if not millions, of parents across the U.S. are now wrestling with the question: Does my child need to repeat a grade? But in 18 states, including Tennessee, this decision will be made not by parents and their children, but by state officials.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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28 minutes ago, China said:

‘Parents are powerless’: Students face being held back after a year of remote learning

 

For a year, the Scruggs worked to keep their kids from falling behind as the pandemic forced children to stay home and America’s education system struggled to adjust. The family installed a whiteboard and baby pink desk next to their TV. The coffee table became a receptacle for homework, folders and laminated multiplication tables.

 

Now, the Scruggs and thousands of families like them in Tennessee and more than a dozen other states face a reckoning with how well they succeeded in their new role as substitute teachers. In the coming months, under a new, stricter state policy, if their son doesn’t do well enough on a standardized reading test next year, he could be forced to repeat a grade.

 

Tennessee’s new law, enacted during a rushed statehouse voting session in January, dictates that if a third-grade student cannot read at grade level as measured by standardized tests, they will be held back until they can. The retention bill was one of several education measures fast-tracked with the support of Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee in an attempt to respond to Covid-related learning loss.

 

So-called third grade reading laws were already the subject of fierce debate in education circles before the pandemic. But while the coronavirus raged, despite near-heroic efforts by teachers who converted their lesson plans for remote learning and parents like the Scruggs, who made their kids’ learning a priority, nearly all students in the United States have fallen behind. Some estimates suggest many — if not most — are now a year or more behind in reading and math.

 

Thousands, if not millions, of parents across the U.S. are now wrestling with the question: Does my child need to repeat a grade? But in 18 states, including Tennessee, this decision will be made not by parents and their children, but by state officials.

 

Click on the link for the full article

1. Eh...its Tennessee....

2. Their last name is Scruggs, terrible last name. Those children have no chance...

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25 minutes ago, Rdskns2000 said:

It may not just be in Tennessee. I've heard that other states may hold back kids a grade.

 

The article says more than a dozen states.

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Um, yeah?

 

just because there’s a pandemic doesn’t mean there are no standards. If someone didn’t learn much of anything they should be held back. Sucks. But what’s the other option? Pretend you can basically miss an entire year of learning and just continue on np?

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On 2/27/2021 at 9:12 PM, Springfield said:

As long as schools are open full time by next school year then I’ll be cool.

 

Same.  My kids have actually handled remote learning about as good as can be expected.  I think what changed for the positive is once the students were allowed to stick around on zoom and chat with each other/trade friend codes, friend requests on switch etc etc.....basically giving them some semblance of a social life with friends again.  


We just received their paperwork acceptance from the school for the 2021-2022 school year and the paperwork seems to suggest the current plan is back to the classrooms full-time like normal.

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My son's now been in school for over a month in MoCo and it's going fantastically.  The virtual school day on Wednesday is a joke though so it's really him going to school 4 days a week with Wednesday off.  

 

But aside from that, he's loving it.  When he goes to play with the kids down the street who opted to stay virtual, we don't even have to tell him to put on his mask.  He puts it on and wants to wear it, because he knows he goes to school and the other kids don't.  

 

He's also 6 and can handle this and makes that decision.

 

Personally I wouldn't care about him wearing one playing outside with the kids he's been playing with the past year, but it's good that he wants to do it himself.  I know the other parents like him doing it too.

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Fairfax County is back to four days in person this week, with Mondays being the asynchronous day.  Reduced class sizes as the parents who picked full time virtual at the beginning of the year are required to stay full time virtual the entire year.  Those who said they'd send their kids back if we got the "all clear" are the only ones going back physically for the rest of the year.

 

Honestly, looking forward to it.  Our kids did okay during this whole thing but we were lucky enough to have a live-in grandmother who could keep an eye on them while my wife and I worked, and even then one of our kids was slipping a bit.  I'm ready for them to go back.

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54 minutes ago, Forehead said:

Fairfax County is back to four days in person this week, with Mondays being the asynchronous day.  Reduced class sizes as the parents who picked full time virtual at the beginning of the year are required to stay full time virtual the entire year.  Those who said they'd send their kids back if we got the "all clear" are the only ones going back physically for the rest of the year.

 

Honestly, looking forward to it.  Our kids did okay during this whole thing but we were lucky enough to have a live-in grandmother who could keep an eye on them while my wife and I worked, and even then one of our kids was slipping a bit.  I'm ready for them to go back.

Yep, we are on week 2 of that in Loudoun. I feel happy for my two middle school kids who are now in class 4 days per week and asynchronous on Mondays. Last week, between 4 days of getting up early again and a pretty regular activity schedule (3 sports between the 2 of them), they were DRAGGING by Friday. I'm glad they get a 2-month run at this because September is going to be a rude awakening for all the kids/families who did 100% distance learning for over a year. 

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Kinda kicking myself, we put kids back in when numbers seemed like they were under control and vaccines were in play. But now numbers are "very high here". I think the reports is that kids are getting sick, but no (symptomatic) clusters appearing in school. So they are getting it in the community but not spreadin IN school. Hopefully it stays that way. Wife and I are vaxxed but grandparents stubbornly refuse. The main driver is that my kids were fraying mentally from the isolation by January/February.

 

Kids here in my red county have been in person since september. No clusters, because of masking/distancing.

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11 hours ago, Forehead said:

Fairfax County is back to four days in person this week, with Mondays being the asynchronous day.  Reduced class sizes as the parents who picked full time virtual at the beginning of the year are required to stay full time virtual the entire year.  

 

It depends on the school... The superintendent's directive was to accommodate as many students that want to come back, given space constraints, with priority given to various at risk groups and those that were already doing physical school two days a week. We're using the update CDC guidance of 3 feet apart for students, which makes it easier, obviously.

 

My school was able to accommodate everyone that wanted to come back the full four days, but there are a lot of kids that want to stay virtual anyway, and I've even had a few that came back for hybrid and then bailed back to virtual because they didn't like it.

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2 minutes ago, techboy said:

 

It depends on the school... The superintendent's directive was to accommodate as many students that want to come back, given space constraints, with priority given to various at risk groups and those that were already doing physical school two days a week. We're using the update CDC guidance of 3 feet apart for students, which makes it easier, obviously.

 

My school was able to accommodate everyone that wanted to come back the full four days, but there are a lot of kids that want to stay virtual anyway, and I've even had a few that came back for hybrid and then bailed back to virtual because they didn't like it.

 

Our elementary school is or was at something like 105% capacity if not higher, so I know it definitely wasn't an option for everyone.  My understanding was people who picked virtual full time had to stick with it for the remainder of the year.  I could be wrong about whether they had a choice, but I do know the school is overcrowded in normal times so they couldn't have offered it to everyone.

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It sucks, but if the ability to work remotely exists then what's the justification for a snow day other than "fun for the kids"?

 

But yeah...that really sucks. It sucks as an adult too! I love a good snow storm and all that goes with it...but for the past decade or so, it's just added more stress because I'm still busy with work AND the kids are wanting to do fun things. 

 

Back to the point of the thread...I'm starting to get curious about how things are going to work in the fall when all schools and students can be back full-time but some will want to opt out. 

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