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Welcome to the Redskins Keith Ismael, C San Diego State


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4036831.png

 

Position: Center
Height: 6’3”
Weight: 309 pounds
School: San Diego State University

40 Dash: 5.34

 

 

The key point of value for Ismael (6'3/309) is his guard/center flexibility. Ismael has starting experience at both spots, which suggests he could theoretically be the backup for three spots along the OL at once. Considering most NFL teams only carry three or four backup OL on the active game-day roster (rather than an entire extra OL), having that kind of flexibility is huge. Ismael is a "rhythmic move blocker" who can succeed in a zone blocking scheme. While Ismael's power and anchor can be lacking, he should still have the tools to be a solid backup.

SOURCE: NFL.com

 

Strengths

  • Has great mobility and functional athleticism for an IOL;
  • Possesses exceptional football IQ;
  • Hustle and Heart are his calling cards;
  • Smooth snap-to-step quickness;
  • Tends to take good angles; stays alert and always aware of his positioning on the field;
  • Great in pass protection.

Weaknesses

  • Core strength leaves a bit to be desired;
  • Unclear if he possesses enough power and drive from his lower body;
  • Can become overeager and get top-heavy at times;
  • Falls off too many blocks;
  • Appears not to play with complete extension.

 

Bottom Line on Keith Ismael

When taking a look at the prospect side of Keith Ismael, he seems poised to become a starter in the NFL one day. With the proper trainers who can improve his upper and lower body strength, he could find himself leading an offensive line in the league someday. His mix of functional athleticism and exceptional football IQ make him an instant target for teams who are looking to improve their depth at the center position late in the draft. While there are many other centers who will likely be drafted before him, Ismael shows a ton of raw potential after playing the position for only one season.

 

Ismael’s flexibility and athleticism will set him apart from many other centers in the draft, and could even boost up his draft stock. He’s got true talent and has great technique when it comes to his hands. If he can fix some of his weaknesses when he enters the league, he has the ability to make an NFL franchise very happy. In short, Ismael may not be able to start for a team immediately, but he could definitely handle a backup/rotational role

Edited by zskins
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11 minutes ago, Fat Stupid Loser said:

That head doesn't look like it should go on a  6'3" 309 pound guy.  Looks like Earkle.  But O line. I like it.

 

What you talkin' about?!

 

tdngtJOW_400x400.jpg

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10 hours ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

I thought that's why we drafted Piersbacher last year ?

Piersbacher isn't very good, stiff and doesn't have much potential.

Ismael has a higher ceiling and better on the move which is what it appears is plan with the new offense. He improves our roster and hopefully becomes a starter.

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11 hours ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

I thought that's why we drafted Piersbacher last year ?

I think they're undewhelmed by Piersbacher ... I am.  Resume sounds good but plays like a JAG even his college highlight reel is ok but underwhelming.

Edited by Brokenstriker
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11 hours ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

I thought that's why we drafted Piersbacher last year ?

 

That was the former coaching regime. 

 

The former front office.

 

Coach Rivera won't be wed to those players.

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As long as he doesn’t get pushed around it’s probably better than we have. Analysts said not good at pushing but very good at standing his ground. 

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2 hours ago, SkinsGuy said:

 

That was the former coaching regime. 

 

The former front office.

 

Coach Rivera won't be wed to those players.

Also, piersbacher has shown nothing to date. I think he gets cut.

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20 hours ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

CBS's main criticism of him, is he needs "more sand in his pants"

 

Scout-speak for he needs to improve his anchor technique and strength.  Sometimes said about guys who tend to play with a narrow base or have a skinny butt and legs.

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On 4/26/2020 at 11:59 AM, stevemcqueen1 said:

 

Scout-speak for he needs to improve his anchor technique and strength.  Sometimes said about guys who tend to play with a narrow base or have a skinny butt and legs.

 

I think our staff can bring that out of him

Edited by Malapropismic Depository
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10 minutes ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

Thanks, I was guessing he just needed to gain weight, lol

But the anchor thing definitely makes sense

 

Realistically, you've got to have some real bulk and strength in your lower half to anchor NFL caliber IDLs, but you also have to perfect the technique--establish a wide base, keep posting and setting through contact, and sink your hips.  It's difficult and unnatural--most offensive lineman are far more comfortable moving forwards than laterally or backwards.  The guys who are already good at this like Cushenberry and Ruiz this year, and Erik McCoy/Elgton Jenkins/Frank Ragnow/James Daniels in previous years typically go early in the draft.

 

Sounds like Ismael is probably going to need a Redshirt season so he can have time to build up his strength and develop his pass protection technique.  On the plus side, it looks like he's already a good run blocker with a strong feel for positional blocking and a good motor.

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1 hour ago, stevemcqueen1 said:

 

Realistically, you've got to have some real bulk and strength in your lower half to anchor NFL caliber IDLs, but you also have to perfect the technique--establish a wide base, keep posting and setting through contact, and sink your hips.  It's difficult and unnatural--most offensive lineman are far more comfortable moving forwards than laterally or backwards.  The guys who are already good at this like Cushenberry and Ruiz this year, and Erik McCoy/Elgton Jenkins/Frank Ragnow/James Daniels in previous years typically go early in the draft.

 

Sounds like Ismael is probably going to need a Redshirt season so he can have time to build up his strength and develop his pass protection technique.  On the plus side, it looks like he's already a good run blocker with a strong feel for positional blocking and a good motor.

 

Yes DJ mentioned that he didn't see many bad reps from his tape

4 hours ago, Brokenstriker said:

I think they're undewhelmed by Piersbacher ... I am.  Resume sounds good but plays like a JAG even his college highlight reel is ok but underwhelming.

 

Agreed. I really don't get why they spent a 5th on him last year. A lot of us wanted Mack Wilson, who has panned out so far for the Browns

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On 4/25/2020 at 2:39 PM, zskins said:

4036831.png

 

Position: Center
Height: 6’3”
Weight: 309 pounds
School: San Diego State University

40 Dash: 5.34

 

 

The key point of value for Ismael (6'3/309) is his guard/center flexibility. Ismael has starting experience at both spots, which suggests he could theoretically be the backup for three spots along the OL at once. Considering most NFL teams only carry three or four backup OL on the active game-day roster (rather than an entire extra OL), having that kind of flexibility is huge. Ismael is a "rhythmic move blocker" who can succeed in a zone blocking scheme. While Ismael's power and anchor can be lacking, he should still have the tools to be a solid backup.

SOURCE: NFL.com

 

Strengths

  • Has great mobility and functional athleticism for an IOL;
  • Possesses exceptional football IQ;
  • Hustle and Heart are his calling cards;
  • Smooth snap-to-step quickness;
  • Tends to take good angles; stays alert and always aware of his positioning on the field;
  • Great in pass protection.

 

 

I went back and watched some San Diego St game film and was - underwhelmed. Agree he generally doesn't get thrown on his butt in the backfield, his pass pro looked ok, but I didn't see him move anybody in any direction they didn't want to move. Literally not once. Kyle is smarter than me, so hope I am wrong.

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15 minutes ago, Rolo Tomasie said:

 

I went back and watched some San Diego St game film and was - underwhelmed. Agree he generally doesn't get thrown on his butt in the backfield, his pass pro looked ok, but I didn't see him move anybody in any direction they didn't want to move. Literally not once. Kyle is smarter than me, so hope I am wrong.

 

As I mentioned earlier, the criticism on him, was to get more "sand in his pants".

That's correctable.

If he was the dominant blocker you were hoping for, he probably would have been drafted higher. But consider where he was picked ; in the rounds where they usually see "projects" with potential, if the player gets the right coaching.

In the late rounds, it's expected that the player is a bit of a project, or has fallen due to some perceived risk.

Maybe 'sand in the pants' is the thing that puts him over the edge, once he learns that in the big leagues

Edited by Malapropismic Depository
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50 minutes ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

As I mentioned earlier, the criticism on him, was to get more "sand in his pants".

That's correctable.

If he was the dominant blocker you were hoping for, he probably would have been drafted higher. But consider where he was picked ; in the rounds where they usually see "projects" with potential, if the player gets the right coaching.

In the late rounds, it's expected that the player is a bit of a project, or has fallen due to some perceived risk.

Maybe 'sand in the pants' is the thing that puts him over the edge, once he learns that in the big leagues

 

How exactly, does one get "sand in the pants"? Is that a technique thing or a weight room thing? 

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