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Update - 3/11/21 - America Rescue Plan Bill is signed!


goskins10
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  • goskins10 changed the title to Update - 3/11/21 - America Rescue Plan Bill is signed!
1 hour ago, goskins10 said:

3. Pass HR1, Infrastructure, and health care reform and let the Rep explain to people why that's a bad thing! Why should it be harder for me to vote? Why shoudl those infrastructure jobs go away and us still drive on bad roads and bridges! And why should we subsidize Health Insurance companies te deterient of real people???  

 

So I am now on the plan of do it. Let's get on the offensive for once instead of playing defense. There will be a very good story to be told, starting with Dems used reconciliation to provide desperately needed relief for Covid while Reps used it to give corporations and rich people a tax break! 


agree completely. And I am less concerned about the repercussions of a GOP trifecta without the filibuster because for one, passing the voting reforms will decrease the likelihood of a GOP trifecta if the country is more majority represented. Also, let them try to repeal popular legislation like healthcare reform, infrastructure, weed legalization, min wage increases etc. it would be suicide to do so. 
 

and without voter suppression, I’m confident in a Dem presidency being a sufficient check on a senate without a filibuster. Take your shot now. 
 

the problem is they don’t have a path there. 

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And so the messaging begins...

 

Joe Biden just launched the second war on poverty

 

Fifty-seven years ago, a Democratic president who had a reputation as a moderate — and who had been a senator and vice president before reaching the highest office in the land — announced his administration would be waging “unconditional war on poverty in America.”

 

The legislation that grew out of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s declaration had no marquee program. Instead, the war on poverty was a collection of new initiatives that have stood the test of time: Medicare; Medicaid; food stamps (now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); aid for women, infants, and children (WIC); school breakfasts; Pell Grants; Head Start; and Section 8 housing vouchers, to name a few. It was a landmark passel of legislation that reshaped American life in the decades that followed.

 

With Congress’s passage of the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, another Democratic president with a reputation as a moderate (and who came through the Senate and the vice presidency) is putting his stamp on American policy. The Covid-19 relief bill, which passed the US House on Wednesday afternoon and was signed into law by President Biden on Thursday, is the most far-reaching anti-poverty legislation in more than 50 years.

 

The American Rescue Plan sends $1,400 checks to adults and child dependents and extends bonus federal unemployment benefits through September (continuing the work done in 2020’s stimulus bills). It also increases the child tax credit for 2021, offers subsidies to help low-income people in states that didn’t expand Medicaid purchase health insurance on the ACA marketplaces, provides housing vouchers for people at risk of homelessness, and boosts the earned income tax credit (EITC) for adults without kids.

 

Johnson’s war on poverty has gotten a raw deal in historical memory. Ronald Reagan’s quip that “poverty won the war” remains the dominant assessment of Johnson’s efforts. (It certainly didn’t help matters that Johnson escalated US involvement in a real, catastrophic war around the same time.)

 

But poverty didn’t win the war. When two economists tried to construct a more accurate measure of American poverty between 1960 and 2010, they found that Johnson presided over a massive decline in poverty. In 1960, the rate of consumption poverty in the US was 30.8 percent. By 1972, it had declined to 16.4 percent. Johnson’s efforts appeared to be the main lever cutting the poverty rate nearly in half.

 

The effects of the American Rescue Plan won’t be quite as massive, but they’ll be in a similar ballpark. By one estimate, overall poverty will fall by a third, and child poverty by over half. 

 

Click on the link for the full article

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A $60 billion surprise in the Covid relief bill: Tax hikes

 

Democrats are getting an early start on their tax-increase agenda.

 

They’ve tucked a trio of little-noticed tax hikes on the wealthy and big corporations into their coronavirus relief package that together are worth $60 billion.

 

One takes away deductions for publicly traded companies that pay top employees more than $1 million. Another provision cracks down on how multinational corporations do their taxes. A third targets how owners of unincorporated businesses account for their losses.

 

It’s surprising because Democrats were widely expected to put off their tax-increase plans until later. Many lawmakers are wary of hiking them now, when the economy is still struggling with the coronavirus pandemic. If anything, when it came to their stimulus plan, Democrats were focused on cutting taxes, not increasing them.

 

But they ran into problems complying with the stringent budget rules surrounding so-called reconciliation measures like the coronavirus legislation — especially after some wanted to add provisions like one waiving taxes on unemployment benefits.

 

If Democrats exceeded their $1.9 trillion budget cap for the plan, they would lose the procedural protections that were used to shield the entire measure from a Republican filibuster in the Senate.

 

The tax increases Democrats picked to help keep their plan’s cost in check had the political benefit of being arcane. Unlike things like raising the corporate tax rate or upping the top marginal tax rate on the rich, the ones they chose won’t produce many headlines.

 

They also fit Democrats’ themes of fighting inequality by forcing the well-to-do to pay more.

 

Since the provisions were added late in the legislative process, lobbyists didn’t have much time to rouse opposition to the plans.

 

“Everybody was caught by surprise,” said a former Democratic aide. “They picked obscure items — things that were not on the radar.”

 

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Florida Sen. Rick Scott implores states to 'reject and return’ stimulus money. Gov. Ron DeSantis wants more.

 

Florida U.S. Sen. Rick Scott has a message for states and cities poised to receive a collective $360 billion from the American Rescue Act stimulus package: Send it back.

 

Scott's call to to reject money that polls show is popular nationally, even among Republicans, has flared tension between Scott and another Florida GOP leader, Gov. Ron DeSantis.

 

In an open letter to governors and mayors, sent moments after the U.S. House on Wednesday approved the $1.9 trillion bill, Scott called it “massive, wasteful and non-targeted," urging states to follow his lead and send a message to Congress to “quit recklessly spending other people’s money.”

 

Scott has a history of bucking federal funds. As governor, he refused to allow Florida to accept Obamacare-related money to expand Medicaid health care coverage.

 

His letter comes as polls show the legislation is extremely popular. A Morning Consult/Politico poll found 69% of U.S. voters said the "package is the right amount" or "doesn’t go far enough," including 54% of Republicans.

 

The latter includes, apparently, Scott's successor, Gov. DeSantis, who complained Florida should be getting a bigger piece of the pie.

 

While Scott was calling for rejection of the assistance, DeSantis announced he has big plans for the stimulus money. And he may well be blaming Scott, at least partly, for not getting Florida more of it. 

 

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13 minutes ago, tshile said:

Re: approval ratings

 

its amazing how much doing something is worth. Doesn’t matter what. Just. Something. 

Pretty much.  I gotta say, I’m fascinated by the child tax credit change - the potential benefits to society, whether the installment plan will continue past 2021, and how Republicans are going to swing getting rid of it.

 

Refreshing that the Biden Administration recognizes some of the ‘failures’* of the Obama Administration, especially the need to advertise.  Here’s hoping it gets some Republicans on board with some legislation to be able to take some credit.  Not holding my breath though.

 

* don’t get me wrong, I appreciated Obama’s attitude, but the humility (along with the struggle for bipartisanship) arguably almost cost the ACA

 

@visionary People are indeed awful.  I’m tempted to rant about how judgmental some people are (without a hint of irony), but I’m gonna let it ride... again, lol.

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4 hours ago, skinny21 said:

Pretty much.  I gotta say, I’m fascinated by the child tax credit change - the potential benefits to society, whether the installment plan will continue past 2021, and how Republicans are going to swing getting rid of it.

 

Refreshing that the Biden Administration recognizes some of the ‘failures’* of the Obama Administration, especially the need to advertise.  Here’s hoping it gets some Republicans on board with some legislation to be able to take some credit.  Not holding my breath though.

 

* don’t get me wrong, I appreciated Obama’s attitude, but the humility (along with the struggle for bipartisanship) arguably almost cost the ACA

 

@visionary People are indeed awful.  I’m tempted to rant about how judgmental some people are (without a hint of irony), but I’m gonna let it ride... again, lol.

Given everything else, they're right about the votes. Dems basically talked down negotiations with themselves and then cut the bill again to get zero GOP votes. Whenever I think about it, it pisses me off! Hopefully, dems learn their lesson going forward and stop trying to appease a party t hgv at doesn't want to work with you. That's all I will say, I'm happy with everything else.

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2 hours ago, Simmsy said:

Given everything else, they're right about the votes. Dems basically talked down negotiations with themselves and then cut the bill again to get zero GOP votes. Whenever I think about it, it pisses me off! Hopefully, dems learn their lesson going forward and stop trying to appease a party t hgv at doesn't want to work with you. That's all I will say, I'm happy with everything else.

Maybe. But it's part of the problem of being a big tent party. Manchin and Sinema had to be placated. With a 50/50 split the Dems can afford zero defections because no Republican will ever cast a vote for the good of the country while a Democrat is President.

Edited by Burgold
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35 minutes ago, Burgold said:

Maybe. But it's part of the problem of being a big tent party. Manchin and Sinema had to placated. With a 50/50 split the Dems can afford zero defections because no Republican will ever cast a vote for the good of the country if a Democrat is President.

If Cunningham could have kept it in his pants, they’d have one extra vote to work with.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Simmsy said:

Given everything else, they're right about the votes. Dems basically talked down negotiations with themselves and then cut the bill again to get zero GOP votes. Whenever I think about it, it pisses me off! Hopefully, dems learn their lesson going forward and stop trying to appease a party t hgv at doesn't want to work with you. That's all I will say, I'm happy with everything else.

 

Not sure that's what happened here. The only things they lost were the Minimum wage, the additional $100 UI and cutoff moving back to $80k and $160k. Those were things Manchin and Sinema wanted. So they had to do that to get tiger 50 votes. 

 

And to be quite honest, I agree with two of those things, removing MW from this bill - I agree it should happen just not with this bill, And the reduction of the cutoffs - the money saved was redirected to children and those with more need. Totally Ok with both. 

Edited by goskins10
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2 hours ago, Burgold said:

Maybe. But it's part of the problem of being a big tent party. Manchin and Sinema had to be placated. With a 50/50 split the Dems can afford zero defections because no Republican will ever cast a vote for the good of the country while a Democrat is President.

 

8 minutes ago, goskins10 said:

 

Not sure that's what happened chere. The only things they lost were the Minimum wage, the additional $100 UI and cutoff moving back to $80k and $160k. Those were things Manchin and Sinema wanted. So they had to do that to get tiger 50 votes. 

 

And to be quite honest, I agree with two of those things, removing MW from this bill - I agree it should happen just not with this bill, And the reduction of the cutoffs - the money saved was redirected to children and those with more need. Totally Ok with both. 

I'm not necessarily pissed at the Dems, more like the absurdity and complete waste of time and resources at the entire process. Hopefully, Dems will hang this around the necks of the gop, don't know if it will do any good though.

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One way to look at it is that this is a sign that the Dems have at least somewhat learned their lesson. Last time they had a super majority and a much more robust one than this, they spent four months compromising and giving ground on Obamacare. They practically neutered it to attract a handful of Republicans. Same thing with the recovery bill, the last time the Republicans destroyed the economy.

 

This time, they at least marched forward and didn't sell their souls and suck the life out of their bills to get a fake degree of bipartisanship.

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