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BBC: China pneumonia outbreak: COVID-19 Global Pandemic


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1 minute ago, LD0506 said:

 

Good timing, I've gotten more fed up with people in general so I tend to stay away from them all

Me too.  They did a segment on the local news the other day about how restaurants are still hurting for employees, and in the same segment gave a very good reason why:  they're getting attacked by guests/customers.  I can hang on for a while, because even tho my "kill 'em with kindness" approach usually works, I worry if I'll be able to keep it up. 

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Coronavirus doesn't care about your politics.

 

‘This whole thing has become politicized’: inside Missouri’s Covid culture wars

 

he boarded-up storefront of Rae’s Cafe in Blue Springs, Missouri, does not look much like a Covid-19 battleground – but it has become a cause célèbre of the anti-masking movement since owner Amanda Wohletz began a campaign in July to defy local Jackson county mask mandates imposed after Delta variant infections surged.

 

New York state governor Kathy Hochul. Hochul said vaccine compliance among nursing home workers increased from 70% to 92% when the mandate went into effect Monday.
New York mandates vaccines for health workers – how will it play out?


Despite warnings, citations, the revocation of a food permit and a county health department’s order to close her doors, Wohletz persisted, claiming in court that the mandate ordering everyone five and up is required to wear a face covering when visiting indoor public spaces was “unconstitutionally created” and efforts to enforce it were “unlawful, nonsensical”.

 

Now the restaurant is shuttered. In a 23 September ruling, a county judge rejected Wohletz’s argument of medical exemptions and that the restaurant could skirt the mandate by operating as a private club. The judge also ordered Rae’s to cease operations until it obtained a valid food permit.

 

Welcome to Missouri’s Covid culture wars.

 

This Republican-run midwestern state was hit hard and early by the pandemic, and again with the Delta wave of a more infectious variant. Tens of thousands of people have become infected.

 

Even though rates are now going down again as the Delta wave recedes, the state’s population is still only 48.18% fully vaccinated. With winter coming and new variants looming, health officials are now concerned that the culture wars that have roiled Missouri – and other parts of America – will leave the state vulnerable again when a next wave strikes.

 

In the heat of the sometimes bizarre battle over masks, mandates and vaccines, many observers worry that Missourians’ personal convictions, often fed by misinformation and nourished by religious conviction, are being harvested for political gain.

 

At the top of the list is Missouri’s attorney general, Eric Schmitt, a Republican who is running for US Senate.

 

Schmitt has sued China, claiming “irreparable damage to countries across the globe, causing sickness, death, economic disruption, and human suffering” caused by Covid-19 and, more recently, initiated a class-action lawsuit against local school districts throughout Missouri, seeking to prevent them from enacting mask policies.

 

“Forcing children to wear masks in school all day long flies in the face of science, and could hinder crucial development by eliminating facial cues and expressions,” Schmitt said last month.

 

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Wife Of Man On Ventilator With COVID-19 Refuses To Allow Him To Be Given Vaccinated Blood

 

A woman’s 52-year-old unvaccinated husband landed in the hospital from severe Covid symptoms last month and needed to be placed in the ICU with a ventilator and ECMO.

 

Her tweets about the tragic situation reveal her refusal to let doctors administer provided much-needed care, for fear he would receive vaccinated blood.

 

After a month-long fight, her husband passed away from the virus, she claims this wasn’t because he was unvaccinated.

 

The woman’s original tweet claimed that she was starting her own personal blood drive for her husband because blood banks weren’t separating vaccinated blood from the unvaccinated blood.

 

“Blood Banks DO NOT separate blood as vaxed/unvaxxed,” she tweeted, “do your research!!!!! We should have a choice!”

 

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I had about a dozen transfusions in '19.  They test blood for everything, I know because I asked (and my mom's a retired RN and told me I'd be fine).  Because I'm in the Emory system, which is closely aligned with the CDC, I had no worries and still wouldn't.  That ***** is crazy. 

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1 hour ago, China said:

Wife Of Man On Ventilator With COVID-19 Refuses To Allow Him To Be Given Vaccinated Blood

 

A woman’s 52-year-old unvaccinated husband landed in the hospital from severe Covid symptoms last month and needed to be placed in the ICU with a ventilator and ECMO.

 

Her tweets about the tragic situation reveal her refusal to let doctors administer provided much-needed care, for fear he would receive vaccinated blood.

 

After a month-long fight, her husband passed away from the virus, she claims this wasn’t because he was unvaccinated.

 

The woman’s original tweet claimed that she was starting her own personal blood drive for her husband because blood banks weren’t separating vaccinated blood from the unvaccinated blood.

 

“Blood Banks DO NOT separate blood as vaxed/unvaxxed,” she tweeted, “do your research!!!!! We should have a choice!”

 

Click on the link for the full article

She must have a nice life insurance policy out on him…

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I remember a conversation I had with my surgeon a few years ago before my rib removal.  
 

Doc:  Oh, I forgot to ask you.  I don’t expect this to become an issue but do you have an objection to receiving another person’s blood?

 

Me:  Huh?

 

Doc:  If something bad were to happen during surgery, which I don’t expect, and we needed to give you blood, would you have an objection?

 

Me:  I guess not.  Is it dangerous?

 

Doc:  If we are at the point where I need to give you blood, we have bigger issues than the potential negatives of receiving blood.  We have to annotate this form so I need a yes or no.

 

Me:  Well, what are the reasons people say no?

 

Doc:  Some people have moral or religious objections to it.

 

Me:  Well that’s ****ing stupid.  
 

Doc:  (laughs a lot). So what do I put on the form?

 

Me:  Yes.  If I’m about to die, don’t let morals or religion keep you from saving me.  
 

Doc:  Will do!

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From 'heroes to villains': Why this Covid surge is different for health care workers

 

Dr. Sheryl Recinos’ patient refused to accept her diagnosis of Covid-19. Her cough was because of Recinos’ perfume, the patient insisted, certain that her positive Covid-19 test could not be correct.

 

Recinos, a family medicine hospitalist in California, was not wearing perfume. The test result, Recinos told her patient, was accurate.

 

The interaction, in summer 2020, was an outlier at the time. But in recent months, such conversations have become more common. 

 

Recinos has treated people who, two weeks into hospital stays for Covid-related breathing struggles, still do not believe they have the coronavirus. She has had patients who have questioned her judgment, patients who have demanded to be given the same medications that former President Donald Trump received when he had Covid and family members of patients who have screamed at her for something as simple as giving their loved ones oxygen, a necessary treatment that they argue is doing more harm than good.

 

“It’s baffling. I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Recinos, who works 12-hour shifts for up to 20 days straight. “So many of us have worked so long and for so many hours, and we’re being undervalued by the general public.” 

 

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California is only state with ‘moderate’ COVID-19 transmission after case rate falls again

 

California continues to boast the lowest coronavirus case rate in the U.S., with the latest data from the CDC showing that the state’s transmission level has decreased yet again.

 

Two weeks ago, California was the lone state where COVID-19 infection rates were considered “substantial,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s four-tiered system measuring community transmission.

 

As of Monday, the nation’s most-populous state is now the only one that falls under the “moderate” transmission category, which is the second-lowest level, behind only the “low” tier.

 

California achieved the lower category thanks to a seven-day case rate that dropped dramatically in two weeks, from 95.3 per 100,000 to its current 41.3 per 100,000.

 

The state’s seven-day testing positivity rate, meanwhile, dropped to 2.6%, a nearly half-percent drop from Sept. 20, according to the California Department of Public Health.

 

Nearly every other state remains at the highest level of community transmission, save for Connecticut, where the transmission level is “substantial,” CDC figures show.

 

North Dakota has the highest case rate of any state in the nation at 566 per 100,000, with a testing positivity rate of 10 to 14.9%.

 

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Virus deaths in Russia hit record for third time this month

 

Coronavirus deaths in Russia hit a record for the third time this month on Tuesday, and daily new infections once again exceeded 25,000 — a surge that comes as vaccination rates in the country remain stagnantly low and the government shuns imposing tough restrictions to stem the spread.

 

Russia's state coronavirus task force reported 25,110 new confirmed cases on Tuesday and 895 new deaths — the country's highest daily death toll in the pandemic. The previous record, of 890 deaths, was registered on Sunday, and the one before that, of 887 deaths, occurred on Friday.

 

The Kremlin has said that the situation elicits concern, but still it is not considering a countrywide lockdown or any other nationwide measures.

 

Deputy Prime Minister and head of the country’s coronavirus task force Tatyana Golikova said Tuesday that Russia is close to registering 30,000 coronavirus infections a day. There are three times more confirmed coronavirus cases this fall compared with last fall, she said.

 

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Read that Johns Hopkins numbers now have more people dying from Covid in the US in 2021 than did in 2020. Just seems bizarre, as the deaths occurred over, what, a 10 month span last year, and we're basically nine months into this year. And we've had the vaxx for pretty much all of this year.

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1 minute ago, hail2skins said:

Read that Johns Hopkins numbers now have more people dying from Covid in the US in 2021 than did in 2020. Just seems bizarre, as the deaths occurred over, what, a 10 month span last year, and we're basically nine months into this year. And we've had the vaxx for pretty much all of this year.

 

We were locked down for a while last year. Virus cant spread like that. People are living their normal lives now and dont even believe in vaccination so its spreading as far as it wants. 

 

I spent an hour and a half in traffic this morning. This time last year I was literally the only car on the road and I had to have some printed excuse as to why I was driving to work. 

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1 minute ago, Llevron said:

 

I spent an hour and a half in traffic this morning. This time last year I was literally the only car on the road and I had to have some printed excuse as to why I was driving to work. 

I'm assuming you're in the DC area? I don't do Metro, but did take it to a Nats game a couple months ago and it was weird seeing the Springfield parking garage basically empty at 3 pm on a weekday.

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55 minutes ago, Llevron said:

 

We were locked down for a while last year. Virus cant spread like that. People are living their normal lives now and dont even believe in vaccination so its spreading as far as it wants. 

 

I spent an hour and a half in traffic this morning. This time last year I was literally the only car on the road and I had to have some printed excuse as to why I was driving to work. 


 

Yeah. And this is with the vaccine. Remember when those dip****s were saying masks don’t work back then?

 

can you imagine us going through 2020 the way we’ve gone through most of 2021? Full stadiums for sports? Concerts and festivals? Schools in full session?

 

it would have been a massacre (as if what we had wasnt.)

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2 hours ago, tshile said:

can you imagine us going through 2020 the way we’ve gone through most of 2021? Full stadiums for sports? Concerts and festivals? Schools in full session?

 

it would have been a massacre (as if what we had wasnt.)

T, your boys Tucker and RoJo say it would've been "not many more" than the 700K that have already died:

 

https://www.mediaite.com/tv/tucker-carlson-questions-if-covid-mitigation-actually-saved-a-huge-number-of-lives-if-we-had-just-ignored-it-would-many-more-really-have-died/

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5 hours ago, hail2skins said:


Just observing, the 2020 flu season was like 1/1,000 of typical. 
 

Kind of suggests that maybe masks, hand washing, and distancing might have an impact on disease spread. 

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The best- and worst-case scenarios for Covid-19 this winter

 

The summer wave of Covid-19 cases and deaths is finally starting to fade, but already, winter is within sight.

 

Last December and January, the United States and much of the world experienced the deadliest surges of the pandemic. At one point, more than 3,000 Americans were dying every day of Covid-19. Nearly 250,000 people died in the United States over December, January, and February.

 

But this winter may be different, at least in America. Last year, almost nobody was vaccinated against Covid-19. As of October 7, 56 percent of the US population is fully vaccinated, according to the New York Times’s tracker. That includes 84 percent of people over 65, who are generally the most vulnerable to dying from the virus. The Food and Drug Administration will soon consider whether to authorize a vaccine for children as young as 5, which would push vaccination rates higher.

 

More than half the population being vaccinated is the primary reason for optimism about the coming months. Some number of unvaccinated people have natural immunity as well; there have been 44 million recorded cases of Covid-19 in the US to date.

 

At some point, the virus starts to run out of people with no protection to infect. While there will be breakthrough cases within the vaccinated population, those people are significantly less likely to develop serious symptoms than if they were unvaccinated. At this stage, the major goals are maintaining hospital capacity to make sure health systems are not so inundated with patients that they must ration care and preventing deaths. The more people with immunity; the fewer deaths we will see. That’s the main reason this winter could be better than last.

 

The Covid Scenario Modeling Hub, which is a synthesis of several projections of future case and death numbers, shows US Covid-19 deaths steadily falling, from an average of nearly 2,000 per day during the last week of September to a projected 90 deaths per day in the final week of February 2022.

 

But that is assuming a lot of children get vaccinated and no new variant emerges that is more transmissible and/or deadly than the delta variant. Under different parameters, if few children get vaccinated and a new variant does become dominant, the coming winter could look a lot different. The Covid Scenario Modeling Hub projects about 650 deaths every day by the end of February in that scenario — and trending upward. That’s not as bad as the last winter, but it is still much worse than other possible futures. (And to be clear: All the scenarios involve significant uncertainty in the specific numbers projected.)

 

Click on the link for the full article

 

 

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‘Buy a vibrator.’ Far-right Republicans keep playing doctor with covid-19.

 

Update: Reinbold has announced she has contracted covid-19.

 

Eagle River Republican Sen. Lora Reinbold, who’s on Alaska Airlines’ no-fly list after making a scene over masking (and therefore unable to attend the current special session in Juneau), has been a seemingly inexhaustible well of misinformation, vaccine conspiracy theories and fringe medical advice throughout the course of the pandemic. She’s railed against the Legislature’s efforts to limit the spread of covid-19 within its buildings, arguing that legislators and staff were in no place to be offering medical advice.

 

It’s apparently a problem that she doesn’t see when it comes to her own actions.

 

In a Facebook post from Monday night, Reinbold posted a list of supplies to have on hand “before covid strikes.” The list includes the sort of things anyone might use to combat the flu or cold like a thermometer, Vic’s, cough medicine and fruit popsicles. It also suggests that people buy a vibrator.

 

“Buy a vibrator to loosen chest congestion,” she suggested. “Lay on right side to open airways. Avoid laying on your back.”

 

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How many people get 'long COVID?' More than half, researchers find

 

More than half of the 236 million people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms—more commonly known as "long COVID"—up to six months after recovering, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The research team said that governments, health care organizations and public health professionals should prepare for the large number of COVID-19 survivors who will need care for a variety of psychological and physical symptoms.

 

During their illnesses, many patients with COVID-19 experience symptoms, such as tiredness, difficulty breathing, chest pain, sore joints and loss of taste or smell.

 

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10 hours ago, China said:

‘Buy a vibrator.’ Far-right Republicans keep playing doctor with covid-19.

 

Update: Reinbold has announced she has contracted covid-19.

 

Eagle River Republican Sen. Lora Reinbold, who’s on Alaska Airlines’ no-fly list after making a scene over masking (and therefore unable to attend the current special session in Juneau), has been a seemingly inexhaustible well of misinformation, vaccine conspiracy theories and fringe medical advice throughout the course of the pandemic. She’s railed against the Legislature’s efforts to limit the spread of covid-19 within its buildings, arguing that legislators and staff were in no place to be offering medical advice.

 

It’s apparently a problem that she doesn’t see when it comes to her own actions.

 

In a Facebook post from Monday night, Reinbold posted a list of supplies to have on hand “before covid strikes.” The list includes the sort of things anyone might use to combat the flu or cold like a thermometer, Vic’s, cough medicine and fruit popsicles. It also suggests that people buy a vibrator.

 

“Buy a vibrator to loosen chest congestion,” she suggested. “Lay on right side to open airways. Avoid laying on your back.”

 

Click on the link for the full article


I’m sure that’s what she told her Sunday morning evangelist husband the vibrator was for, lest she be labeled a scarlet.  After all, if he believes horse pills can cure COVID he’ll believe anything…

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