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BBC: China pneumonia outbreak: COVID-19 Global Pandemic


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1 minute ago, daveakl said:

As a North Carolinian who has been to many a Piggly Wiggly, I can assure you sir, that is 100% not a Piggly Wiggly. 

 

We're apparently getting one in Greensboro. 

 

I honestly didn't know they were still in business until I read about them opening one here a year ago.

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14 minutes ago, clietas said:

 

We're apparently getting one in Greensboro. 

 

I honestly didn't know they were still in business until I read about them opening one here a year ago.

Used to be one that was walking distance from the Guilford College campus in the 70s. 

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Just now, EmirOfShmo said:

Used to be one that was walking distance from the Guilford College campus in the 70s. 

 

I live close to their campus. There's a Harris Teeter n a Walmart across the street now from Guilford. 

 

I remember last spring there was an incident downtown where a lady spat at a news crew. Police were sposidly looking for her to charge her with assault. Don't see why coughing intentionally on someone should be treated any differently. 

 

 

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Major backlogs in processing patient data during the pandemic are forcing the healthcare sector to reassess its relationship with fax machines.

 

As coronavirus cases surged in the city of Austin, Texas, last June, beleaguered public health officials instructed anyone with symptoms to act as though they had Covid-19. The reporting and tracing of new cases had slowed to a crawl, officials explained, partly due to an unexpected culprit: the fax machine.

 

The machines had kicked into overdrive as the pandemic tightened its grip on the city, spitting out printout after printout of results from Covid-19 tests. "We were probably getting thousands of cases a day that we were responding to. It was madness," says Janet Pichette, the chief epidemiologist for Austin Public Health. "You cannot fight a pandemic using 19th-Century technology."  

 

More than a dozen staff combed through the stacks of printed facsimiles that at times piled up to 18cm (7 inches) thick, tasked with weeding out duplicates and tracking down any missing information. From there the results were manually entered into the city's tracking system.

 

Similar scenes were playing out around the world, highlighting the persistence of traditional fax machines in sectors such as healthcare, financial services and real estate, despite the global uptake of email, instant messaging and cloud computing. The inefficient sharing of data has left a growing number of governments promising to finally abandon their use of fax machines. More than 175 years after the technology was first patented and decades after it peaked as a must-have tool for businesses, could the coronavirus pandemic consign the fax machine to history?

 

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Yippee, another variant!

 

What we know about the new C.1.2 coronavirus variant

 

While much of the world’s focus has been on the Delta variant of coronavirus, a new variant has been identified in South Africa.

 

Currently referred to as the C.1.2 variant, it is yet to be called a variant of interest or concern by the World Health Organization (WHO), but is drawing the attention of scientists due to the number and types of mutations it contains and the speed at which the mutations have occurred.

 

C.1.2 is reported to be the variant carrying the most mutations since the original “wild” variant emerged in China.

 

A pre-print study put out by South Africa’s National Institute for Communicable Diseases said the C.1.2 variant was first identified in the Gauteng and Mpumalanga provinces in May 2021; it has since been found in other South African provinces as well as in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mauritius, New Zealand, Portugal and Switzerland.

 

According to the preprint, there are several mutations carried on the C.1.2 variant – and some of these may make it more transmissible and even evade vaccine protection, though this is yet to be formally concluded.

 

For a variant to be declared a “variant of concern” by the WHO it must be proven to show “increased transmissibility, virulence or change in clinical disease, and a decreased effectiveness of public health and social measures”; it is too early to say if this is true of C1.2. WHO spokeswoman Margaret Harris told a United Nations briefing that they were monitoring the variant but it does not appear to be spreading.

 

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Volusia County Councilman Fred Lowry 'in the hospital wrestling with COVID-19'

 

Volusia County Councilman Fred Lowry is hospitalized with COVID-19, County Chair Jeff Brower announced Tuesday.

 

"He is in the hospital wrestling with COVID-19. It's been about three weeks now," Brower said as Tuesday's council meeting kicked off with Lowry's chair empty for the second week.

 

Lowry, a 66-year-old registered Republican, is midway though his second four-year term on the Volusia County Council, representing Deltona, Enterprise and parts of DeBary and Osteen. He was a Deltona City Commissioner from 2010 until his 2014 election to the county seat.

 

He attracted controversy this summer for promoting conspiracy theories, including some about the coronavirus pandemic, in a sermon at Deltona Lakes Baptist Church.

 

"We did not have a pandemic, folks. We were lied to," Lowry said in the May 30 sermon.

 

He referred to Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, as "Dr. Falsey" — "I did not mispronounce that. That’s the way I wanted to say it." — and labeled him a liar and pervert. He also took issue with media coverage of the COVID-19 treatment hydroxychloroquine and the theory coronavirus originated in a Wuhan lab.

 

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Sweden Bans U.S. Travelers, Vaccinated or Not

 

Until we meet again, Stockholm.


For two glorious months, Americans were able to book a vacation or reunite with family or friends in Sweden. But the opportunity is over, at least for now. After lifting its ban on travel from the United States on June 30, Sweden has reinstated its U.S. travel ban, effective September 6.


The move comes after the European Council last week announced its decision to remove the U.S. from its safe travel list. From June 30 to September 6, U.S. travelers who presented proof of a negative COVID-19 test result from within 48 hours prior to arrival could enter Sweden, regardless of vaccination status.

 

Now, only those Americans who are traveling to Sweden for an exempted purpose, such as residents of Sweden or essential workers, will be allowed to enter; they will still need to provide a negative COVID-19 test result upon arrival. Leisure travelers will be turned away at the border.

 

“The amendment is the result of an update of EU recommendations regarding travel into the EU based on . . . the severely deteriorated epidemiological situation in these countries,” the Swedish government stated in a release about the new entry protocols.

 

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So it was Big Pharma that killed off all the Aztecs. I knew it. Insane theories, one, regular theories, a billion. 🤪

 

I don't know about y'all but I like to start my day with a good dose of bubonic plague. It's natural and 100% organic. Best detox available. Unlike that cheap made in a lab Covid 19 junk.

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New Studies Find Evidence Of 'Superhuman' Immunity To COVID-19 In Some Individuals

 

Some scientists have called it "superhuman immunity" or "bulletproof." But immunologist Shane Crotty prefers "hybrid immunity."

 

"Overall, hybrid immunity to SARS-CoV-2 appears to be impressively potent," Crotty wrote in commentary in Science back in June.

 

No matter what you call it, this type of immunity offers much-needed good news in what seems like an endless array of bad news regarding COVID-19.

 

Over the past several months, a series of studies has found that some people mount an extraordinarily powerful immune response against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the disease COVID-19. Their bodies produce very high levels of antibodies, but they also make antibodies with great flexibility — likely capable of fighting off the coronavirus variants circulating in the world but also likely effective against variants that may emerge in the future.

 

"One could reasonably predict that these people will be quite well protected against most — and perhaps all of — the SARS-CoV-2 variants that we are likely to see in the foreseeable future," says Paul Bieniasz, a virologist at Rockefeller University who helped lead several of the studies.

 

In a study published online last month, Bieniasz and his colleagues found antibodies in these individuals that can strongly neutralize the six variants of concern tested, including delta and beta, as well as several other viruses related to SARS-CoV-2, including one in bats, two in pangolins and the one that caused the first coronavirus pandemic, SARS-CoV-1.

 

"This is being a bit more speculative, but I would also suspect that they would have some degree of protection against the SARS-like viruses that have yet to infect humans," Bieniasz says.

So who is capable of mounting this "superhuman" or "hybrid" immune response?

 

People who have had a "hybrid" exposure to the virus. Specifically, they were infected with the coronavirus in 2020 and then immunized with mRNA vaccines this year.

 

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Idaho hospitals begin rationing health care amid COVID surge

 

Idaho public health leaders announced Tuesday that they activated “crisis standards of care” allowing health care rationing for the state’s northern hospitals because there are more coronavirus patients than the institutions can handle.

 

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare quietly enacted the move Monday and publicly announced it in a statement Tuesday morning — warning residents that they may not get the care they would normally expect if they need to be hospitalized.

 

The move came as the state’s confirmed coronavirus cases skyrocketed in recent weeks. Idaho has one of the lowest vaccination rates in the U.S.

 

The state health agency cited “a severe shortage of staffing and available beds in the northern area of the state caused by a massive increase in patients with COVID-19 who require hospitalization.”

 

The designation includes 10 hospitals and healthcare systems in the Idaho panhandle and in north-central Idaho. The agency said its goal is to extend care to as many patients as possible and to save as many lives as possible.

 

The move allows hospitals to allot scarce resources like intensive care unit rooms to patients most likely to survive and make other dramatic changes to the way they treat patients. Other patients will still receive care, but they may be placed in hospital classrooms or conference rooms rather than traditional hospital rooms or go without some life-saving medical equipment.

 

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1 hour ago, Cooked Crack said:

 

 

 

So much for being pro-life.  I wonder what the Venn diagram of anti-vaxxers and pro-life people looks like.

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Monster risk: Fauci says COVID cases 10x too high

 

Americans are now getting infected with COVID-19 at 10 times the rate needed to end the pandemic, which will persist until more people get vaccinated, NIAID director Anthony Fauci tells Axios.

 

Threat level: "The endgame is to suppress the virus. Right now, we're still in pandemic mode, because we have 160,000 new infections a day. That's not even modestly good control ... which means it's a public health threat."

 

"In a country of our size, you can't be hanging around and having 100,000 infections a day. You've got to get well below 10,000 before you start feeling comfortable," Fauci says.


Once enough people have been vaccinated, he adds, "you'll still get some people getting infected, but you're not going to have it as a public health threat."


Between the lines: Despite all of the buzz about the Mu variant, which appears to elude some protective properties of authorized vaccines and prior infections, the Delta variant continues to dominate in the U.S. and around the world.

 

The good news: Fauci says this means currently authorized vaccinations are still effective.


The bad news: Not enough Americans are taking measures against the Delta variant, which has already upped the stakes.


And, the longer it takes to end this pandemic phase, the bigger the chance we'll end up with a "monster variant" that not only eludes vaccines but also is dangerously transmissible.

 

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