China

DB: Feral Hogs Killed a Texas Woman. Experts Say They Are Coming for America.

Recommended Posts

Feral Hogs Killed a Texas Woman. Experts Say They Are Coming for America.

 

“Exsanguination due to feral hog assault” was the official cause of death for 59-year-old Christine Rawlings as determined by the local medical examiner and announced by Sheriff Brian Hawthorne of Chambers County, Texas.

 

She had been set upon around 6 a.m. on Nov. 22 as she arrived at the residence where she worked as a home care attendant for an elderly couple. 

 

“It was probably still dark and that is when hogs normally move, in the dark hours,” Hawthorne told a press conference the next day. “She had gotten out of her car and locked it.”

 

In the next moment, the feral hogs, also called feral pigs, were on her, slashing with curved lower teeth kept razor sharp by grinding them against the uppers.

 

“Multiple animals,” Hawthorne said. “We can kind of tell that from the different sizes of the bites.”

 

He noted that an attack by any number of feral pigs on a human is unusual. 

 

“This is very rare,” Hawthorne said. “Less than six in the nation over many years.”

 

Mayer confirmed that such attacks are unusual, though less rare than shark attacks. Sharks average about six fatal attacks a year globally. Feral pigs are at that now. 

 

“But you never read about them,” Mayer said.

 

Whatever triggered this tragedy, there are likely to be ever more encounters with humans as the feral pig population in the United States grows. 

 

A sow can conceive her first litter at 3 months old and keep doing so twice a year, usually producing five to six offspring, but sometimes as many as 12 at a time. 

 

“There’s not another animal that can put little feet on the ground quicker than a wild pig,” Mayer said.

 

And climate change may be a further population booster. Scientific studies in Europe have determined that generally milder winters encourage feral pig reproduction and increase the survival rate of newborns. Warmer springs encourage production of acorns, the feral pig’s favorite food. And prolonged wet periods increase the supply of delicacies: bulbs and roots and tubers.

 

The population growth may at times outstrip the abundance of immediately available foods, sending the omnivores in search of alternative such as whatever is to be found in garbage cans. 

 

At present, there are as many as 6 million wild pigs in the U.S.. There may be 2 million or more in Texas alone.

 

Add to that the possibility that wild pigs could become a vector for the African swine fever virus that U.S. officials are desperate to keep from our shores. The disease has either killed or caused to be euthanized half of the 600 million agricultural pigs in China in the past 13 months. The virus can live for more than a week in meats, which explains the pork-sniffing dogs that are welcoming passengers arriving from China at our airports. 

 

Pork confiscated at California’s San Jose Airport has apparently been ending up with the rest of its garbage at the nearby Guadalupe landfill. Mayer noted that YouTube videos show numerous wild pigs foraging there. He said all you would need would be for a wild pig to gobble something infected. The disease would quickly spread to other wild pigs, which interact with farm pigs through fence lines.

 

“If that happens, it’s all over,” Mayer said, “We’ll never get it under control… You’re not going to be able to afford bacon or pork chops after that.”

 

Click on the link for the full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surprised that the confiscated meat isn't incinerated . Oh yeah government efficiency - they probably didn't think about it. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Mr. Sinister said:

"Exsanguination" always sounds so dark and romantically maccabre...

 

I had to google it. Bad way to go. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a pic of a Javalina. A whole pack of them tried to attack me once - I slammed my front gate closed to keep them away. It is not a Hog or even the same species class as a hog - (It's a rodent).

 

598b847e64f10.image.jpg

Edited by nonniey
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Javalina probably about 50lbs.  Thought for years they were hogs but are a rodent. They like to knock over and raid our trash cans on occasion. They will attack if they feel threatened.  

 

more info

Javelina stand about 2 feet tall and can weigh between 35 and 55 pounds. They are 3 to 4 feet long.

https://www.desertmuseum.org/kids/oz/long-fact-sheets/Javelina.php

 

 

Edited by nonniey
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, nonniey said:

 

Here is a pic of a Javalina. A whole pack of them tried to attack me once - I slammed my front gate closed to keep them away. It is not a Hog or even the same species class as a hog - (It's a rodent).

 


So it's a ROUS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Larry said:


So it's a ROUS?

Yes, but we don't have fire swamps (occasionally have fire though). 

Edited by nonniey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, nonniey said:

Javalina probably about 50lbs.  Thought for years they were hogs but are a rodent. They like to knock over and raid our trash cans on occasion. They will attack if they feel threatened.  

 

more info

Javelina stand about 2 feet tall and can weigh between 35 and 55 pounds. They are 3 to 4 feet long.

https://www.desertmuseum.org/kids/oz/long-fact-sheets/Javelina.php

 

 

 

Mean little suckers, but feral hogs are a whole different class

 

Hunters Blaine Garcia and Wyatt Walton caught a 790-pound boar on Friday, Jan. on a ranch Jan. 16, 2015, on a ranch in De Leon, a town about 35 minutes west of Stephenville. Garcia and Walton are debating the

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, twa said:

 

Mean little suckers, but feral hogs are a whole different class

 

Hunters Blaine Garcia and Wyatt Walton caught a 790-pound boar on Friday, Jan. on a ranch Jan. 16, 2015, on a ranch in De Leon, a town about 35 minutes west of Stephenville. Garcia and Walton are debating the

I won't argue with that. (Why is it tied to the tree - it is dead isn't it)?

Edited by nonniey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Llevron said:

 

I had to google it. Bad way to go. 

 

Seems like a pretty peaceful way to go actually.  You bleed out until you loose consciousness.  Much worse ways to die.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peaceful except for the slashing,biting and trampling  I suppose.....damn near pleasant.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, twa said:

Peaceful except for the slashing,biting and trampling  I suppose.....damn near pleasant.

 

The original comment by Mr. Sinister only said exsanguination, which is blood loss.  That alone does not sound horrific. But "Exsanguination due to feral hog assault" is.  Compared to something like "Disembowelment"which would is always horrific regardless of circumstances (unless you were under anesthesia, I suppose)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.