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    • By Destino in ES Coverage
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      We’re still doing this?  Absolutely!  Despite all the compelling reasons to just let everyone go home and enjoy and extended offseason, this is not an option.  The games must be played, and therefore we the long-suffering fans will feel compelled to watch.  Even games no reasonable football fan would choose to watch like, for example, today’s Redskins Jets game.   

      Today’s convergence of sadness features the 30th ranked scoring offense (Jets 14.4 ppg) versus the 32nd (Redskins 12.0 ppg).  The first team to 15 wins!  With no playoff aspirations the compelling story lines for this game are largely limited to watching young players (hopefully) develop.  Dwayne Haskins gets his first home start and Derrius Guice is back from injury.   
       
      My, reasonable, goals for today’s game:  
      1- Score a touchdown 
      2- Score more than 17 points.   
      3- Haskins throws for 200 yards or more with no interceptions  
      4- Guice runs the ball at least 10 times and finishes at 3.5 yards per carry and healthy.  
       
      Hoping for a win at this point feels like setting myself up for disappointment, so I’m happy to settle for an entertaining loss.  
       
      Special thanks to @pez for some excellent Guinness beef stew.  If you absolutely have to stand in a frozen parking lot at 9am, the best place to do it is at the Extremeskins Tailgate with Pez and @Huly.  Great fans, great people. 
       
      The Redskins have declared for the following players as inactive: 
      Paul Richardson  
      Colt McCoy 
      Deshazor Everett 
      Chris Thompson  
      Ross Pierschbacher 
      Vernon Davis  
      Tim Settle  
       
      The Jets declared the following players as inactive  
      Nate Hairston  
      Darryl Roberts  
      Paul Worrilow 
      Matthias Farley  
      CJ Mosley  
      Jordan Willis  
      Leo Koloamatangi 
       
      1st Quarter - Redskins 0 - 6 Jets
      If you wanted to sit in the cold and watch a football game with some Jets fans at FedEx, but were worried that there were not enough seats available, I have good news.  There’s plenty of space available, so come on down and prove you’re a real fan by sitting though this in person.
       
      Jets dominated the 1st quarter even though they only scored 6 points.  The reason being that Washington managed only 13 yards of offense and a single first down.  
       
      Question: Is it still a check down pass if the QB never looks at anyone else?
       
      2nd Quarter - Redskins 3 - 20 Jets
      The Jets have achieved an insurmountable 13 point lead early in the 2nd quarter.  All hope is lost.

      Is there a more perfect example of the Redskins offense than their first scoring drive in the 2nd quarter?  Interception gives the Redskins the ball on the Jets 16 yard line.  They proceed to march 10 yards backwards before kicking a field goal from the Jets 26.  It's perfect.  Two or three more field goals we can call it a day. 

      The Jets score again and if feels like they are are just piling on at this point.  Three touchdowns in the first half for them, just three points for the redskins.  Our streak of no touchdowns has now extended to 15 quarters. 
       
      3rd Quarter - Redskins 3 - 20 Jets
      There is a spider slowly descending from the ceiling in the press box and it's the most interesting thing that's happened during the third quarter of this game. 
       
      I have decided to allow the spider to live, provided it does not touch me.  I'm off to get some more caffeine. 

      4th Quarter - Redskins 17 - 34 Jets
      The first wave of Redskins fans, the few that are here, started streaming towards the exits after that 4th Jets touchdown.  As if the Jets didn't have this game wrapped up in the 2nd quarter. 
       
      Jet have now more than doubled their average points per game and have matched their season high of 34 points (and they missed two field goals in this game). 
       
      TOUCHDOWN REDSKINS!  THE DROUGHT IT OVER!  Guice took a short pass from Haskins  all the way to the house.  2 point conversion is successful on a pass from Haskins to Quinn. 
       
      The Redskins score another touchdown!  This feels like an embarrassment of riches, even if we are still certain to lose this game. 
       
      End of Game.
       
      Let's review those reasonable goals I mentioned earlier:
       
      1- Success.
      2- Close enough, I'm counting it
      3- Haskins did throw for over 200, but unfortunately did have an interception. 
      4- Guice was not given the opportunity to run the ball ten times today.  He did however score on a 45 yard TD pass and finish the game healthy.  I'll take it.
       
      Even though the Redskins lost, it was good to see the offense show some faint signs of life and end the streak of games without a TD.  The team looked competitive for much of the second half, and perhaps they could have made this a fun game if they carried that same energy throughout.  It was good to see Guice and Mclaurin show out today.  I think both of them have a future with this team that I look forward to seeing. 

       
       

       
       
       
       
       
Boss_Hogg

Redskins.com: Redskins Name Bill Callahan Head Coach

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Posted (edited)

Callahan won't be able to fix the problems on this team.   He was on Gruden's staff.   Anyone connected with Gruden's staff needs to be fired.   The only good Coach they had was hired away by the Rams.   This team is lacking in almost every facet of the game.   Discipline, physical fitness, motivation, tackling and blocking.Those attributes are supposed to be instilled by the Head Coach and Assistant Coaches.   This team needs to rebuild.   Weed out the players with attitude problems and the players who refuse to play with discipline.   When the new Head Coach arrives, he best have a track record of winning.   Whatever it takes to get a HC like Belichick, get it done.   No matter what the cost.   If he wants 50 million for 5 years.   Pay it.   One of the most disappointing parts of Gruden's tenure was his lack of player management.   Gruden had none.   All active players must get playing time.   If they don't, how the hell would you know if you have a star sitting on the bench?   How would you know what group of players perform well together?   How can you expect a player to do well when you actually need him in the game if he hasn't played for 2 or 3 months.    Player management is one of the most important aspects of the game.   

Edited by DavidK
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This is a thread title I’d expect to see some time around 2004 

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12 hours ago, Silvernon said:

 

Would not shock me, and don't think it's a bad idea. 

 

Name KOC the Assistant HC/offensive coordinator, and give him another year or two to get ready to take over. 

 

Right.

 

Having the guy who is the architect of a 3.2ypc running game, a highly penalized offensive line, a guy who has seen all of the linemen under his watch regress rather than progress and will throw the ball... on third down... run your team for the foreseeable future is a plan that will really grab the fanbase by the nuts and get 'em to buy right in.

 

We're saved. Yay.

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Posted (edited)

Manusky has escaped scrutiny with Jay the lightning rod.  So I want Callahan to answer what happened to our defense, and why did it take 4 weeks of humiliating failures, to try and do something different.  Who thought it was best to use the same predictable defense for 4 weeks, and who decided it was time to change. Fire and promote, based on those answers. There is a story there that no one gives a rats ass about, but me clearly. 

 

We all saw a change vs the Patriots, and Brady was on his ass a few times. Belly wasted no time in altering his offense on their 2nd drive and went hurryup and marched down on us with ease, and scored.  That is our coaching failures in a nutshell right there. It took us 4 weeks to try a new approach on D, and it takes the king 1 series.  

 

Jay may well be here today if our defense wasn't so predictable and pathetic to start the season.  And I still think Bruce had more say over the defense, than Jay did.

Edited by RandyHolt
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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, RandyHolt said:

And I still think Bruce had more say over the defense, than Jay did.

 

Bruce kept the buddy who's side of the ball wasn't getting anything done and fired the buddy who went against the owners wishes one time too many. Bruce liked Jay and probably wanted to keep him but he doesn't really make the decisions.

 

Of the past 8 first round draft picks 1 of them was an offensive player that Gruden could actually use. Sherff, when he's not injured.

 

3 of them were for RG3, 2 for DL on the worst 3rd down defense in the league and the last one is on a QB that's probably not ready for prime time until 2021.

 

I never liked the hiring of Jay Gruden but that doesn't mean he's responsible for the debacle that he was inserted into with the intention that he'd do the impossible Dan Snyder's way.

Edited by SkinsFTW
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7 hours ago, DavidK said:

When the new Head Coach arrives, he best have a track record of winning.   Whatever it takes to get a HC like Belichick, get it done. 

I'm pretty sure the only way to get a HC like Bill is to kidnap and water torture Bill himself until he agrees to coach here.

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2 minutes ago, BatteredFanSyndrome said:

I'm pretty sure the only way to get a HC like Bill is to kidnap and water torture Bill himself until he agrees to coach here.

 

He's hardcore. He'd just end the session with " We're on to Cincinnati".

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, SkinsFTW said:

 

He's hardcore. He'd just end the session with " We're on to Cincinnati".

 

After his third game here it would be more like, "I'm on to Florida, I don't know what you ****ers are on to."

Edited by KDawg
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First you get to Replace the good Gruden and ride his team into a Superbowl you're wildly unprepared for.

 

Now, you're replacing the fat losing Gruden into a draft bowl on a winless team. 

 

You really dont see a career crash the way Bill's has. It's sad really. 

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Word is the local media was sticking around to watch a couple minutes of the first Callahan-led practice. Im interested to hear how different it was from club jay 😂😂😂

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HC Bill Callahan Press Conference:

 

- Injuries. Larry Hess to put out the report after practice today

- Making announcement Friday for who will start at QB (has not been decided as per previous report)

- Taking a look at all 3 from a health perspective

- Practice was different today... switching and tweaking the format. Different stretches. Focus on TEAM, Captains, etc for leadership

- Sprints at the end of practice, get guys more focused. Conditioning is important. Stamina and energy late in games.

- Distributed reps with all 3 QBs today with the first team offense. Equal work

- Haskins development. He's improved in terms of seeing more, mainly from Giants game. Graduating him and his learning curve in to the process.

- Focused on drive starters during practice. Will watch film later to review situational football.

- Referees/Officials were at practice today. Spoke to NFL League Office and they allowed it. Help with finding out what we're doing right or wrong on alignments, etc. Eliminating penalties is a focus.

- Trying to get back to the fundamentals of football. Pushing the guys physically to improve.

- On defensive coaching staff - fairness issue. Fresh start for everybody. Give guys an opportunity to improve players and the system. Patient and not impulsive on staff changes

- Players seemed receptive to the coaches conversation with them before practice about fundamentals, executive, etc. 

- His experience has helped him see a lot through the years. He's seen whats transpired and it's allowed him to go back and look at how to be a better coach

- Connecting and creating relationships with players to find out how to make them successful

- On rushing the ball, he wants more rush attempts. Doesn't care about yards per average. Wants pass completions.

 

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The refs at practice thing. Seriously. This hasn't been done? It seems like it should be a common thing. 

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Just now, ShredSkins said:

The refs at practice thing. Seriously. This hasn't been done? It seems like it should be a common thing. 

 

Happens quite a bit during training camp, especially with joint practices. Not so much during the season

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Posted (edited)

 

Callahan is known for riding his O line hard.  I predicted (not that it was hard to do that) we'd hear the song of the tougher and meaner practices.  I'd buy into it more if the dude wasn't in charge of the O line and running game for years here.  The O line has been undisciplined.  The running game has been terrible.  Cooley among others has done a nice job dissecting the play calls on that front -- among other things saying they are trying to do too many things where its hard for the O line to excel because they are thinking too much and have too much on their plate.  Saying Gibbs basically had three run plays and the O lineman got masterful at running them.  Ditto Shanny with the zone scheme based runs.

 

Having said that they likely smoke the Dolphins and for a week we will hear about how these changes have transformed the team.  Until the week after when they get smoked.  That's my prediction. 

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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Hoffman just now said he talked to a few players and they told him the meat of the practice (which was closed to the media) was similar to any other practice they had.  The part that changed some was the beginning part which was the part that happened to be open to the media. 

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7 minutes ago, Skinsinparadise said:

Hoffman just now said he talked to a few players and they told him the meat of the practice (which was closed to the media) was similar to any other practice they had.  The part that changed some was the beginning part which was the part that happened to be open to the media. 


the stretching was different 

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Does anyone know if they practiced in pads today? I saw some interesting comments from some players saying that they haven't practiced in pads in over 2 weeks and that really messes with them in their ability to train with the correct contact points and stay sharp in that respect. If that is true it kind of adds some reasoning to why we're having so many holding calls.

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I like many others on this board do not think we have found the Belicheck to say the least, but i liked a lot of what I heard from Callahan in his presser. For example the ability to kind of refer to specific analytical data was great to hear. Shows a distinction that I believe we are behind the ball with as far as following analytical data. The focus on drive starters was interesting also. Just be watching a lot of offenses around the league we all know the importance of the "New First Down Run"; short pass to running back. Looking at some of the more explosive offenses it is clear that they put the same emphasis on run attempts (25-30) and building on completions no matter the distance of them. Under Jay it seemed too many of the drives ended the same due to the repetition of the drive flow. The word chunk plays became too much of an emphasis not because we couldn't do it but because the focus wasn't on taking the easy completions. Hitches, curls, slants should all be meshed within the chunk plays as should run attempts. I am no defensive coach by far but even I can easily predict not only certain plays calls but drive flow. When Callahan mentioned drive starters it had dawned on me that putting the defense on their heels immediately is a premium. It opens up so many opportunities for chunk plays, creative runs plays, or easy completions. It seemed to happen more often that not that under Jay we said take what the defense gives up but forgot the first part of that is dictating drive flow and keeping the defense on their heels leads to being able to take those easy completions. Nothing is easy if you either follow the same drive flow every time or are in an obvious throwing situation. I am not thrown off in the least bit about Bill stating to want more rush attempts because i do not think that means rush first down rush second and throw third. As far back as i can remember we have almost exclusively ran the ball to start drives. How if we put an emphasis on situational football as Jay referenced use the same drive flow against every opponent. I can go on for days about that lol but in short, I really like what Bill has said thus far and i hope it translate to some type of identity and edge for our football team.

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FWIW, I've been very impressed with Callahan's first two pressers. 

 

Hopefully, this all bears fruit and we finally start to see a professionally run football team again. At least on the field.

 

Hail. 

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4 hours ago, Cooleyfan1993 said:

Word is the local media was sticking around to watch a couple minutes of the first Callahan-led practice. Im interested to hear how different it was from club jay 😂😂😂

 

FWIW

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The analytics types, like Sharp, aren't big on the run the ball drill.  Ditto Football Outsiders and to a less extent PFF.  their stats show running the ball is great to ice a game.  If you have a lead in the 2nd half, run the ball to secure the lead.  But passing beats runs by a mile to build the lead in the first half.

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.footballoutsiders.com/info/FO-basics

 

You run when you win, not win when you run.

The first article ever written for Football Outsiders was devoted to debunking the myth of "establishing the run." There is no correlation whatsoever between giving your running backs a lot of carries early in the game and winning the game. Just running the ball is not going to help a team score; it has to run successfully.

There are two reasons why nearly every beat writer and television analyst still repeats the tired old-school mantra that "establishing the run" is the secret to winning football games. The first problem is confusing cause and effect. There are exceptions, usually when the opponent is strong in every area except run defense, like last year's Green Bay Packers. However, in general, winning teams have a lot of carries because their running backs are running out the clock at the end of wins, not because they are running wild early in games.

The second problem is history. Most of the current crop of NFL analysts came of age or actually played the game during the 1970s. They believe that the run-heavy game of that decade is how football is meant to be, and today's pass-first game is an aberration. As we addressed in an essay in Pro Football Prospectus 2007 about the history of NFL stats, it was actually the game of the 1970s that was the aberration. The seventies were far more slanted towards the run than any era since the arrival of Paul Brown, Otto Graham, and the Cleveland Browns in 1946. Optimal strategies from 1974 are not optimal strategies for today's game.

A sister statement to "you have to establish the run" is "team X is 5-1 when running back John Doe runs for at least 100 yards." Unless John Doe is ripping off six-yard gains Jamaal Charles-style, the team isn't winning because of his 100-yard games. He's putting up 100-yard games because his team is winning.

 

 

https://www.sharpfootballanalysis.com/analysis/nfl-offenses-turned-to-the-pass-in-2019-and-turned-the-corner/

Running as often as some of these teams did is like fighting against the tide: it will work when the tide is low and you’re playing an opponent who is beatable with any style, so it convinces you to continue with this -EV strategy. But when it is high tide, fighting against the rules and modern day efficiencies which favor the passing game when taking on a tough opponent won’t often end well. These teams would be well served to reassess their 2018 tactics.

 

Edited by Skinsinparadise

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12 minutes ago, Skinsinparadise said:

The analytics types, like Sharp, aren't big on the run the ball drill.  Ditto Football Outsiders and to a less extent PFF.  their stats show running the ball is great to ice a game.  If you have a lead in the 2nd half, run the ball to secure the lead.  But passing beats runs by a mile to build the lead in the first half.

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.footballoutsiders.com/info/FO-basics

 

You run when you win, not win when you run.

The first article ever written for Football Outsiders was devoted to debunking the myth of "establishing the run." There is no correlation whatsoever between giving your running backs a lot of carries early in the game and winning the game. Just running the ball is not going to help a team score; it has to run successfully.

There are two reasons why nearly every beat writer and television analyst still repeats the tired old-school mantra that "establishing the run" is the secret to winning football games. The first problem is confusing cause and effect. There are exceptions, usually when the opponent is strong in every area except run defense, like last year's Green Bay Packers. However, in general, winning teams have a lot of carries because their running backs are running out the clock at the end of wins, not because they are running wild early in games.

The second problem is history. Most of the current crop of NFL analysts came of age or actually played the game during the 1970s. They believe that the run-heavy game of that decade is how football is meant to be, and today's pass-first game is an aberration. As we addressed in an essay in Pro Football Prospectus 2007 about the history of NFL stats, it was actually the game of the 1970s that was the aberration. The seventies were far more slanted towards the run than any era since the arrival of Paul Brown, Otto Graham, and the Cleveland Browns in 1946. Optimal strategies from 1974 are not optimal strategies for today's game.

A sister statement to "you have to establish the run" is "team X is 5-1 when running back John Doe runs for at least 100 yards." Unless John Doe is ripping off six-yard gains Jamaal Charles-style, the team isn't winning because of his 100-yard games. He's putting up 100-yard games because his team is winning.

 

 

https://www.sharpfootballanalysis.com/analysis/nfl-offenses-turned-to-the-pass-in-2019-and-turned-the-corner/

Running as often as some of these teams did is like fighting against the tide: it will work when the tide is low and you’re playing an opponent who is beatable with any style, so it convinces you to continue with this -EV strategy. But when it is high tide, fighting against the rules and modern day efficiencies which favor the passing game when taking on a tough opponent won’t often end well. These teams would be well served to reassess their 2018 tactics.

 

I totally agree with Sharp and am a big proponent of analytical data. I agree that you should pass more to build the lead. That is relevant to teams with direction. Establishing the run and trying to run for 100 yards per game was never directly correlated with winning a football game. Just because it has become a passing league does not mean that you can excuse a team for not having a 20 carry game with any running back combined through 5 games in a season. Literally zero prolific offenses have that. Data proves it.

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, DmvE said:

I totally agree with Sharp and am a big proponent of analytical data. I agree that you should pass more to build the lead. That is relevant to teams with direction. Establishing the run and trying to run for 100 yards per game was never directly correlated with winning a football game. Just because it has become a passing league does not mean that you can excuse a team for not having a 20 carry game with any running back combined through 5 games in a season. Literally zero prolific offenses have that. Data proves it.

 

You were praising though Callahan at least in theory for following analytics.  That remains to be seen.  Sharp doesn't seem to think so as to his take of Callahan's rhetoric.  What i posted there wasn't the only part of him making fun of Callahan's statements.  But will see. 

 

Jay's biggest gaffe to the analytics guys were the heavy runs on first down.  Should be interesting to see if that changes.  

Edited by Skinsinparadise

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