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Welcome to the Redskins Bryce Love RB Stanford


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I can't believe B Love is going to play and Guice is gone. The sky is definitely the limit and I believe Dr Love will be smart enough to know his own body well enough and understand where he is medically, to come back safely.

 

Alex Smith, Foster and B Love. One of our guys is definitely earning come back player of the year this season. 

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On 8/9/2020 at 5:25 PM, mistertim said:

 

The only "official" thing I was able to find was the 4.4

 

On 8/9/2020 at 5:06 PM, wit33 said:


Any chance he lost speed with weight gain? Is it official somewhere that he ran a 4.35?

 

On 8/9/2020 at 12:52 PM, wit33 said:

Love looks like a 4.5 guy

 

The only official 40 time I have seen for Love is the 4.4 he put up coming out of high school that @mistertim saw. There are a lot of people who indicate he is faster than that (coaches, announcers) but nothing truly official. I remember one announcer saying after a big run that he is a 4.3 in the 40 and a 4.5 in the classroom. I thought that was clever so it stuck with me.

 

That leaves us with largely unofficial ways to measure his speed. The best example I have found is a highlight that occurs in one of the games against USC in 2017. The play in question is at the 20 sec mark. Take special note of defender #25 who is pursuing the play. Both he and Love take about the same path, so angles don’t play a huge role.

 

 

 

I believe #25 for USC is Jack Jones, a CB. He came out of high school as a highly touted recruit and with recorded 4.28 speed

 

REF: https://www.sbnation.com/college-football-recruiting/2016/2/3/10819590/jack-jones-recruiting-commitment-highlights-usc-alabama-texas-am

 

While it is unfair to compare explosion in the previous highlight (Love clearly has a running start) what I am focusing on is at worst, Jones does not close the distance at any point. I would even argue that Love extends his cushion. Jones is taking a similar line, appears to be busting his hump, and still does not reduce the distance between them. While this is not concrete evidence, I think its fair to say pre-injury Love’s top gear was pretty fantastic.

 

Whether he regains that kind of top end speed remains to be seen. Its nice to have someone on the roster that has proven this feat possible.

 

Zombie is also available for tips on how to resume full activity after long periods of down time.

Edited by FootballZombie
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2 hours ago, Koolblue13 said:

Alex Smith, Foster and B Love. One of our guys is definitely earning come back player of the year this season. 

 

If alex Smith wins Comeback PoY, something went very wrong with Haskins

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Fantasy Football article, but it's interesting to see PFF's take on our RB situation: https://www.pff.com/news/fantasy-football-breaking-down-the-washington-football-team-backfield-for-fantasy-football-can-adrian-peterson-hold-off-antonio-gibson-and-bryce-love

 

“There’s no way I am drafting any running back on that team — we don’t even know who the starter is going to be.” This is the exact reason why unsettled backfields like that of the Washington Football Team need to be a target in the later rounds of fantasy football drafts.

 

Ambiguous backfields offer so much value, as the uncertainty leads to a suppressed draft cost for each of the running backs. There's also a higher chance to find a running back breakout in an ambiguous backfield versus a running back starting as a handcuff, as discussed in this article by fantasy football analyst JJ Zachariason.

 

With the recent release of Derrius Guice, the Washington backfield offers this exact type of mixed bag — multiple running backs with breakout potential along with cheap fantasy production in veteran Adrian Peterson. It was laughable to see Washington add running back after running back to its depth chart during the offseason, but now the joke’s on us if we're not trying to take advantage of the value.

 

ADRIAN PETERSON | ADP RB54

Since Guice's release, Adrian Peterson’s ADP has risen 10 spots in BestBall10s. The market has rightfully identified Peterson as a clear winner and the most likely candidate in Washington to be the clear-cut RB1 on early downs.

 

The team exercised its option on Peterson's contract back in February under new head coach Ron Rivera, who had glowing remarks about the 35-year-old running back: “Adrian Peterson is the epitome of what it means to be a pro in this league. Adrian's leadership and passion towards the game of football will set an example of what is expected of the players in this program moving forward.”

 

With his new head coach welcoming him back with open arms, it’s hard to not see Peterson lead the team in carries and rushing yards, considering he was solid in that role in 2019.

 

On 211 rushing attempts in 15 games, Peterson rushed for 898 yards with an average yards after contact per attempt that ranked 20th (3.0) among all running backs with at least 100 carries. He also ranked 20th in forced missed tackles (37) and tied for 10th in rushes of 10 or more yards (25) — his company included much younger running backs in that category: Aaron Jones, Josh Jacobs, Dalvin Cook and Devin Singletary.

If his recent workload is any indication — his 499 touches over the past two seasons ranks 10th at the position — Peterson still seems to have plenty left in the tank. He should continue to run well under new offensive coordinator Scott Turner, who ran a heavy inside zone scheme (28%, 15th) during his four-game stretch as the offensive coordinator with the Carolina Panthers in 2019. Among running backs with at least 50 carries last year, Peterson ranked 11th in yards per carry (4.2) on inside zone runs.

 

The upside for Peterson is going to be limited because the offense in 2020 is going to throw much more. When Turner took over the Panthers, no team ran fewer running plays.

 

The silver lining for Peterson is that the offense did throw it to the running back position third-most on first and second down — Peterson played 94% of his snaps on early downs in 2019. If the offense continues to target running backs on early downs, he could offer more as a receiver. 

Last season. Peterson was hardly used as a receiver, but he still flashed his elusiveness, ranking second in missed tackles forced per reception (0.47) among all running backs who had at least 10 receptions.

 

The veteran is going to continue to be overlooked in fantasy drafts because his overall upside is not high in a below-average offense with a shaky offensive line, but he offers a decent floor. He could help balance rosters that have more high-ceiling and low-floor players.

 

Peterson has missed just one game over the past two seasons (healthy scratch), and after the team’s Week 10 bye week he finished the remainder of the season as the RB21 overall and ranked No. 4 in fantasy points per snap (0.47) — trailing only Mark Ingram, Derrick Henry and Austin Ekeler.

 

ANTONIO GIBSON | ADP RB46

Antonio Gibson is the high-upside play among the Washington running backs considering his insane production at Memphis, albeit on an extremely small sample size (33 carries, 38 receptions).

 

In 2019, the running back/wide receiver hybrid averaged 11.7 YAC per reception, 11.2 yards per carry, 19.3 yards per reception and 7.7 yards after contact per attempt. His forced missed tackle rate as a rusher (0.48) ranked first and as a receiver (0.45) ranked third among qualifying running backs and wide receivers. You can’t go broke drafting a player who forced a missed tackle on half of his touches.

 

Gibson is a playmaking stud, and Turner showed his willingness to manufacture touches for a player with that type of skill set. He tried to take advantage of Curtis Samuel’s rushing ability — nine rushing attempts for 44 rushing yards — at the tail end of 2019. Turner also recognized Samuel's struggles as a deep ball receiver, so he had his receiver run fewer deep patterns; as a result, Samuel’s aDOT decreased (15.6 vs. 12.5).

Turner’s takeover also helped D.J. Moore get fed. He was peppered with targets (18) and ranked third in the league among wide receivers in first downs (11) in his two healthy games with Turner calling the shots.

 

Gibson has already drawn comparisons to Christian McCaffrey, and although that's a hefty bar for the third-round rookie, fantasy owners are salivating at the possibility of Gibson emerging as a high-volume, dual-threat back. 

 

At a minimum, Gibson should project to lead the team in targets and receptions out of the backfield. That could provide plenty of fantasy value considering Washington will probably see its fair share of negative game scripts with aprojected win total in the neighborhood of 5 or 5.5 wins.

There’s not much competition for overall targets in the offense outside of second-year wide receiver Terry McLaurin. Turner targeted the running back position more when he had full reigns over the offense — Carolina increased its rate of targeting the running back (28.8% vs. 24.4%) during Weeks 13-17.

 

The biggest concern for Gibson is the learning curve. It’s already difficult enough for rookies to make an immediate impact, and the shortened summer in 2020 can't help. To ask him by Week 1 to understand all the offensive concepts as both a running back and wide receiver could too much, so Gibson’s role might be limited at the start and expand as the season progresses.

 

Regarding Gibson as a running back, Washington running backs coach Randy Jordan said, “He is still clay when it comes to running back.” PFF’s consensus fantasy rankings have Gibson ranked as WR46 and 104 overall.

 

BRYCE LOVE | ADP RB66 

Bryce Love is the ultimate wildcard of Washington backfield. The 2019 fourth-round pick was never expected to contribute as a rookie after tearing his ACL in his last college game in 2018. But Washington drafted him anyway knowing he would essentially be redshirted.

 

In Love’s best collegiate season (2017), he rushed for 2,111 yards (second), forced 76 missed tackles (fourth), averaged 8.1 yards per carry (second) and earned PFF’s second-highest rushing grade (91.4) among running backs with at least 60 carries.

 

His 2018 campaign was less stellar, as Love dealt with ankle injuries, but he still showed plenty of production and ranked 13th in elusive rating and top-10 in missed tackles forced per rushing attempt. He also displayed pass-catching chops with a career-high 20 receptions on 24 targets while forcing six missed tackles on those receptions. Washington's running backs coach compared Love to fellow former Stanford RB Christian McCaffrey as a do-it-all running back.

 

If the 2017 version of Love were to resurface in 2020, he could be a steal in fantasy football. The 23-year-old is fully healthy entering the season, having passed his physical at the end of July.

 

Sharp fantasy gamers are onto Love’s potential upside, as his ADP has moved up 20 spots, the most of any Washington running back. 

 

PEYTON BARBER | ADP RB79

J.D. MCKISSIC | ADP N/A

Nobody was talking about either of these guys all offseason (rightfully so), but because of the newfound ambiguity of this backfield, they are worth looking at. J.D. McKissic signed a two-year $3.27 million contract with Washington this offseason and Peyton Barber signed for two years and $3.0 million.

 

McKissic played with the Detroit Lions last season, where he mixed in at wide receiver and running back, finishing the season with 34 receptions on 39 targets without a single drop — the best rate among all running backs with at least 35 targets.

 

He was also extremely efficient as a rusher. On 38 carries, McKissic averaged 5.4 yards per carry and 3.42 yards after contact per attempt, which ranked sixth and 14th, respectively, among running backs with at least 35 attempts.

 

Barber earned the lowest PFF rushing grade (63.4) of his career in 2019, which ranked 27th out 29 running backs with at least 150 rushing attempts. His yards after contact per attempt (2.31) and rushes of 10 or more yards (eight) ranked dead last among qualifiers.

 

VERDICT

Peterson is going to be the early-down starter in Week 1 when Washington takes on the Philadelphia Eagles, with a combination of Love and Barber serving as his immediate backups. In obvious passing situations, McKissic and Gibson will battle it out for touches.

 

I think that McKissic is an interesting arbitrage play to Gibson in deep redraft formats or best ball because he essentially is not being drafted at all — it’s not out of the range of outcomes that Gibson could struggle trying to play multiple positions, which McKissic has already shown he can do at the NFL level. Should that come to fruition, McKissic could be an extremely underrated asset across all fantasy formats.

 

Ultimately, Gibson, Love and McKissic (in that order) all offer interesting upside, making them easy targets to draft late because of their potential as pass-catchers in an offense that is going to post much better passing numbers in 2020. 

 

For dynasty owners out there who already have Gibson, put him on the trade block. There's been a lot of hype buzzing around him since the Guice release. Even though I think he has a lot of potential in 2020, there's no guarantee that he starts the season firing on all cylinders.

 

If somebody offers you Henry Ruggs III for him straight up, go ahead and smash the trade accept button. 

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On 8/13/2020 at 11:26 AM, ConnSKINS26 said:

But it doesn’t matter because he participated in the combine and ran an official 4.40 at 230+. It’s easily verifiable. No need to dig for older numbers. 

yeah Im not digging, you just compare apples to apples as best you can.

Also football speed is different.

I like to look at 40 time in brackets.  Like when a guy runs 4.3 that's a different kind of speed.

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1 hour ago, TheShredder said:

yeah Im not digging, you just compare apples to apples as best you can.

Also football speed is different.

I like to look at 40 time in brackets.  Like when a guy runs 4.3 that's a different kind of speed.


I get it, but we have an official combine 40 for Barkley. Just because we have nothing “official“ for Love since HS doesn’t mean it makes sense to throw away newer, more accurate measurements for Barkley just to equalize them in some way lol. It’s Love that we don’t have conclusive evidence for, while we know for sure that Barkley is not a 4.66 guy, so stating that is not a good way to proceed in the comparison. 

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1 hour ago, TheShredder said:

yeah Im not digging, you just compare apples to apples as best you can.

Also football speed is different.

I like to look at 40 time in brackets.  Like when a guy runs 4.3 that's a different kind of speed.


I agree football speed is different.  But I didn’t understand what you mean by looking at the times in brackets?  I pay attention to 40 yard dash times too.

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I can buy it.  As I've said before, Bryce was an overall -- well rounded RB at Stanford.  Inside-outside.  He wasn't a scat back.  Explosive.  Weaknesses were pass pro and he didn't show much as a pass catcher albeit he didn't get that many opportunities to catch the ball.   And he was improving on both fronts. 

 

 

 

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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Love was a baller at Stanford. If healthy I think he can make a difference.

 

I still like Gibson a lot. Remember it took Chris Thompson a couple years to really get going too. Wouldn't be shocked if Gibson took the same route.

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50 minutes ago, Koolblue13 said:

 

 

Not shocked about AG

 

Struggling in pass pro? How?

 

Is there even any contact in practice yet? Was his form bad when he was pretending to block air? Did he lose a fight against a turf monster? Did he put his helmet on backwards?

 

 

If Gibson is struggling, I guess its from a knowledge standpoint. Like he does not know who he is responsible for on a given play.

 

May not be the biggest issue. In a live fire situation you may get by just picking up the most interior free rusher. I guess some plays he may have edge responsibilities.

 

Anyways, I am not too worried until we hear reports of him from an actual contact practice. Plus, he’s not a 3rd down back, he is a gadget guy. Not quite as important for him. I’d love it if my guard has the ability to kick out to tackle, but that is a luxury, not a necessity.

 

Bryce on the other hand has to develop this ability. It will be crucial to his success. Without it, his career will surely decay. (Zombie Pun)

 

 

Edited by FootballZombie
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7 minutes ago, Skinsinparadise said:

 

Ok, sorry I missed it

 

It's fine. It wasn't directed at you. Just a weird coincidence with that twitter dude.

It got me thinking though. How about this for a nickname for Love : Muscle Car.

Because he ain't just fast, he's strong for someone with his size and speed.

Edited by Malapropismic Depository
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1 hour ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

 

It's fine. It wasn't directed at you. Just a weird coincidence with that twitter dude.

It got me thinking though. How about this for a nickname for Love : Muscle Car.

Because he ain't just fast, he's strong for someone with his size and speed.

Hes gonna be a doctor and his name is Love. B Love. Even we can't **** up Dr B Love :ols:

 

Although we do have a McClaren on the track already.

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For the record, Gibson struggling with pass pro assignments and the like makes a lot of sense.  He was mostly a WR in college that got some RB reps.  A lot of those RB reps, he was either carrying the ball, or a diversion on the play.  In some cases he was blocking but usually as a run blocker.

 

How many possible snaps did he have in college for pass protection?  It can't be that many.

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I have posted before that I think Love can contribute this year especially w Guice gone. I think we keep AP, Barber, Love and JD as the 4 rbs. Gibson will play mostly at wideout and special teams. His contributions will be limited till later in the year once he adjust to the pro game. 

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1 hour ago, skinsfan93 said:

I have posted before that I think Love can contribute this year especially w Guice gone. I think we keep AP, Barber, Love and JD as the 4 rbs. Gibson will play mostly at wideout and special teams. His contributions will be limited till later in the year once he adjust to the pro game. 

I agree. AG will get mostly back burnered, especially the first half of the year, but that's a great talent to have in our pocket.

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4 minutes ago, Koolblue13 said:

I agree. AG will get mostly back burnered, especially the first half of the year, but that's a great talent to have in our pocket.

 

With our dearth of experience and proven play makers at WR I doubt Gibson will be on the back burner. I'd guess he'll start out more as a receiver than a pure RB. Then work him in more at RB as he gets better with blocking and picking up blitzes. 

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