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DE Montez Sweat, Mississippi State

Sweat came into this week with a buzz and given the depth of edge rushers and defensive linemen, that’s saying something. In person, Sweat is a pretty massive figure. He stands at 6’6 and weighs 245, all distributed in the prototypical defensive end way. He carries himself like an NFL player already according to Mississippi State personnel. He works out like a pro, he’s around the facility like one, essentially he’s already all business. On the field, he showcased a great bend off the edge and a great get off. His athletic ability is apparent and his complementary work ethic should make him extremely successful at the next level.

 

A two-way player, he played tight end in addition to defensive end in high school and was ranked as one of the top recruits at the tight end position nationally as he entered college. On top of that, he played basketball, so his athletic ability is unparalleled. He started his collegiate career at Michigan State before transferring and spending a year in junior college and then getting to Mississippi State from there. He led the SEC in sacks as a junior in 2017 and was named a first-team All-American by three different outlets in his senior season after recording 11.5 sacks, which was good for seventh-best in Mississippi State history in a single season.

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Posted (edited)

Sweat's rush style reminds me of the way Le'veon Bell runs. He waits for a split second to follow the play before committing. It will be nice to have a guy who doesn't consistently overrun plays.

Edited by Stadium-Armory
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1 hour ago, HTTRDynasty said:

 

Aaron Donald

Von Miller

JJ Watt

 

Everyone else is a tier below.

How much of that is us seeing him every day? I agree that those guys are better, but I don't think Kerrigan is a full tier below those guys when it comes to production. 

 

Just a quick glance, over the last 4 years Kerrigan only has I think 2 or 3 fewer sacks than Miller. 

 

From 2014 to 2017, just a slightly older article from PFF, Miller had 44 games with 4 or more pressures while Kerrigan had 39. From 2011 to 2017 Kerrigan was second only to Von Miller on total pressures with 445, and 3rd behind Miller and Jordan on QB hits and sacks.

 

I just think Kerrigan is underated and having Sweat on the other side will show that. Assuming he is as good as we think he is. This Dline could be incredible with Allen and Payne having more experience and the pressure from the outside. It's very exciting.

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Kerrigan has got to be ecstatic with the new dedication to the defense through the draft. We potentially have some guys who'll end up all pros. 

 

I'm not putting Kerrigan down at all, but I'm also not going to pretend theres no holes in his game or that hes not replaceable. 

 

Anderson, if he improves like he did last year, is going to start stealing more snaps from him. He definitely should have been on the field more as the season wore on last year. That's a good thing and how its supposed to work.

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7 hours ago, MisterPinstripe said:

How much of that is us seeing him every day? I agree that those guys are better, but I don't think Kerrigan is a full tier below those guys when it comes to production. 

 

Just a quick glance, over the last 4 years Kerrigan only has I think 2 or 3 fewer sacks than Miller. 

 

From 2014 to 2017, just a slightly older article from PFF, Miller had 44 games with 4 or more pressures while Kerrigan had 39. From 2011 to 2017 Kerrigan was second only to Von Miller on total pressures with 445, and 3rd behind Miller and Jordan on QB hits and sacks.

 

I just think Kerrigan is underated and having Sweat on the other side will show that. Assuming he is as good as we think he is. This Dline could be incredible with Allen and Payne having more experience and the pressure from the outside. It's very exciting.

 

Ryan Kerrigan is going to be 31 to start the season. His game isn't built on speed and he's never had health issues, but at some point he will slow down. Kerrigan is going to be very very difficult to replace. In reality, Sweat would be a massively successful draft pick if he is just as productive and reliable as Kerrigan has been, but brings some speed. Obviously, I think Sweat's ceiling is higher than that, but Kerrigan has always been very very good, without ever being great. That is un undervalued commodity. 

 

Also, I love that picture of sweat jumping for the ball. 

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11 hours ago, 98ORAKPO98 said:

Khalil Mack?

 

I considered Mack, and he’s the best all-around player IMO. The complete package. I just don’t think his pass-rushing is as consistently elite as the others. 

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10 hours ago, MisterPinstripe said:

How much of that is us seeing him every day? I agree that those guys are better, but I don't think Kerrigan is a full tier below those guys when it comes to production. 

 

Just a quick glance, over the last 4 years Kerrigan only has I think 2 or 3 fewer sacks than Miller. 

 

From 2014 to 2017, just a slightly older article from PFF, Miller had 44 games with 4 or more pressures while Kerrigan had 39. From 2011 to 2017 Kerrigan was second only to Von Miller on total pressures with 445, and 3rd behind Miller and Jordan on QB hits and sacks.

 

I just think Kerrigan is underated and having Sweat on the other side will show that. Assuming he is as good as we think he is. This Dline could be incredible with Allen and Payne having more experience and the pressure from the outside. It's very exciting.

 

I love Kerrigan. He’s been our most consistently good player for most of this decade. However, just comparing stats across the board doesn’t do those other guys justice. Von and Donald have been facing double teams on a consistent basis these last few years, and they are still wrecking game plans. Watt, when healthy, does the same. Kerrigan has never really been that kind of player.  He’s a clear tier below, imo. Nothing to be ashamed of, since there are only a handful of those guys every generation. 

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13 hours ago, Stadium-Armory said:

Kerrigan has 84 career sacks in eight seasons. 20 more and he's top 30 all time. Pretty nice player.

 

And you wanna bet, he gets 20 more, or how long it will take him ? ;)

Might even be a quicker pace than before, considering the help he's getting.

On the flip side, he might have to share some of the sacks this year.

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https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2019/05/12/jay-gruden-has-no-doubt-montez-sweat-will-play-a-lot-this-year/amp/

 

At least one of the teams that removed him from the board for health reasons nevertheless regarded him as the best pass rusher in the draft. Sweat’s speed had something to do with that assessment.

 

“He’s just fast,” Gruden said of the guy who ran a 4.41-second 40-yard dash at the Scouting Combine. “He’s fast. He eats up ground when he runs. It’s like three strides and he’s all the way across the field and it’s crazy.”

 

It’s not crazy to think of the kind of steal Washington will have gotten — and some teams may end up thinking it was crazy to take him off the board — if the heart condition detected at the Scouting Combine ends up being a non-issue.

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39 minutes ago, 98ORAKPO98 said:

https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2019/05/12/jay-gruden-has-no-doubt-montez-sweat-will-play-a-lot-this-year/amp/

 

At least one of the teams that removed him from the board for health reasons nevertheless regarded him as the best pass rusher in the draft. Sweat’s speed had something to do with that assessment.

 

“He’s just fast,” Gruden said of the guy who ran a 4.41-second 40-yard dash at the Scouting Combine. “He’s fast. He eats up ground when he runs. It’s like three strides and he’s all the way across the field and it’s crazy.”

 

It’s not crazy to think of the kind of steal Washington will have gotten — and some teams may end up thinking it was crazy to take him off the board — if the heart condition detected at the Scouting Combine ends up being a non-issue.

 

I actually said this in the draft thread - before the draft.

Montez Sweat will be to us in 2019, as J. Allen was to us in 2017, in taking advantage of a falling stud due to bogus medical reports.

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Posted (edited)

https://www.clarionledger.com/story/sports/college/mississippi-state/2019/03/28/nfl-draft-montez-sweat-nashville-prospect-mel-kiper-combine-pro-day-projections-espn-football-picks/3289226002/

 

Sweat could've decided to take it easy after the combine. He's a surefire first-round pick at this point, and giving scouts more glimpses at MSU's Pro Day could have done more harm than good. Scouts from all 32 NFL teams were in attendance Wednesday, watching his every move. 

 

Yet he still showed up and went through position drills in Starkville one month before the draft. For Sweat, the process of becoming a professional football player isn't complete until Goodell calls his name next month. 

“I've still got everything to prove," Sweat said. "I talk about creating my own path, my own destiny. I’m not like all those other guys who sit out drills and stuff like that. I’m here to compete.”

 

Immediately after the combine, Sweat went to Atlanta to work with his pass-rushing coach, Chuck Smith. Smith played college football at Tennessee before spending nearly 10 seasons in the NFL. 

Since retiring from the league, Smith has worked with some of the best defensive linemen in today's game, including the Denver Broncos' Von Miller. Miller said he already felt like the "Michael Jordan of pass rushing" when he first heard of Smith. Smith told him he'd be his Phil Jackson. Since then, Smith has helped Miller become even more of a well-rounded pass-rusher. 

 

"For guys who don't have moves, Chuck can teach them moves," Miller said. 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/www.espn.com/nfl/draft2019/story/_/id/26432393/how-montez-sweat-team-molded-freak-elite-prospect%3fplatform=amp

 

Honing his pass-rushing skills

It's not just about the measurables -- Sweat wants to refine his pass-rushing skills, too. Former LSU standout DE Arden Key (now with the Raiders) referred Sweat to pass-rushing coach Chuck Smith of in Atlanta. Sweat has been meeting with Smith since the summer of 2017. Sweat is from the Atlanta area, so he works with Smith two or three times a week when he's in town.

Smith has been working to improve his hand placement and movement. Like Callaway, Smith loves Sweat's work ethic. He also thinks Sweat asks good questions and takes coaching well. His voice lit up when he described some of the things they are working on -- including a new addition to Sweat's pass-rushing repertoire.

 

"We worked on something called the 'long-arm ghost.' It's a move that Von Miller kind of invented. You use the long arm, then go to the ghost. First you long-arm the guy, then you fake like you're going to long arm him and bend underneath. We added that so he's coming into the league with an arsenal. He's going to be one not to mess with in his rookie year."

 

The long-arm move is natural for Sweat thanks to his 35-plus-inch arms. A defensive lineman's length can be a plus on the field, but offensive lineman can also use it against them.

"Staying low is very important," Sweat said. "The biggest thing you can give an O-linemen is your chest and upper body. It's easy for a tall guy to come out of his stance and be tall because that's what he's comfortable doing. You have to keep repping, staying low out of your stance."

After a nine-year career as a defensive end with the Falcons and Panthers, Smith knows what it takes to be a successful pass-rusher and believes Sweat has it.

"Tez is going to outrun guys, and he's only getting better. He's still learning. Tez uses his moves, and he's the prototype -- tall and shredded. I think Tez is going to be a great NFL player."

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.clarionledger.com/amp/3539451002

 

Sweat emerged as one of the top pass-rushing threats in the country while at State. His record-breaking performance at the NFL Scouting Combine earlier this year further cemented his potential. Sweat clocked in at 4.41 seconds in the 40-yard dash, which set the record for the fastest time ever by a defensive end. 

At 6-foot-6 and 245 pounds, Sweat was a matchup nightmare for even the best offensive linemen in the Southeastern Conference. The NFL is a different animal, but with proper guidance and training Sweat could become one of the most formidable edge rushers in the league. 

Edited by 98ORAKPO98
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Here is another good breakdown on Sweat with some good videos. 

 

https://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2019/3/15/18263489/montez-sweat-nfl-draft-2019-washington-mississippi-state-scouting-report-defensive-end

 

Also, I couldn't help but notice that Myles Garret's peak sack output in college wasn't any better than Sweat's. His workouts also weren't as good and he has more bulk but less length. What a steal Sweat was at 26. I really think he could be an All Pro type player. 

 

https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/players/myles-garrett-1.html

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, UK SKINS FAN '74 said:

I really hope Montez doesn't buy a new car when his contract gets done.

 

Who needs a car, when you can run twice as fast as a gazelle ?

On foot, he probably races past DC area highway traffic.

And not even break a sweat.

Edited by Malapropismic Depository
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On 5/13/2019 at 12:06 AM, 98ORAKPO98 said:

 

A two-way player, he played tight end in addition to defensive end in high school and was ranked as one of the top recruits at the tight end position nationally as he entered college.

Now I understand why they didn't address TE,because they did!   Cut Davis now!  :silly:

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16 hours ago, UK SKINS FAN '74 said:

I really hope Montez doesn't buy a new car when his contract gets done.

Yeah ideally he'll keep driving the 30 year old Honda accord his grandmother gave him so the fans will think he's humble and that will somehow translate into guaranteed success on the field.

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7 hours ago, Anselmheifer said:

Here is another good breakdown on Sweat with some good videos. 

 

https://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2019/3/15/18263489/montez-sweat-nfl-draft-2019-washington-mississippi-state-scouting-report-defensive-end

 

Also, I couldn't help but notice that Myles Garret's peak sack output in college wasn't any better than Sweat's. His workouts also weren't as good and he has more bulk but less length. What a steal Sweat was at 26. I really think he could be an All Pro type player. 

 

https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/players/myles-garrett-1.html

 

After our Burns v Sweat debate I’m surprised how bullish you have become on Montez. We seem to have a consensus on him here at the ES.

 

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8 minutes ago, volsmet said:

 

After our Burns v Sweat debate I’m surprised how bullish you have become on Montez. We seem to have a consensus on him here at the ES.

 

 

Honestly, I think I watched a few highlights of both of them and formed a quick early opinion. I didn't dig deep enough on Sweat. Especially since I thought he was going to go outside of our draft range. Not enough tape watching.

 

My schedule is super super crazy with work and family this year. You and SIP and McQueen, and probably some others, did most of the legwork for me this year in terms of identifying prospects and I just watched the prospects that I thought would be good targets for us, with the time that I had. I also did partake in some prospect porn, watching guys that I knew were outside our range, like Josh Allen. Turns out, that upon further review, I think we got a guy better than the one I coveted!

 

Having circled back and watched more of both and looked at their scouting reports and workouts, etc, I think Sweat is special. He has the highest ceiling of any of the pass rushers in this year's draft, and I've been waiting for us to swing on a player like that. Sweat's floor also looks pretty high given that he had the top run stop percentage and pressure percentage of all of the edge players this year.  I mean, with his speed and length and power, I think his uninjured/unsuspended floor is an 8 sack a year player that is also good vs the run. I could easily see him as a 12 sack a year player with some 15-18 sack seasons. 

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Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, Anselmheifer said:

 

 

Having circled back and watched more of both and looked at their scouting reports and workouts, etc, I think Sweat is special. He has the highest ceiling of any of the pass rushers in this year's draft, and I've been waiting for us to swing on a player like that. Sweat's floor also looks pretty high given that he had the top run stop percentage and pressure percentage of all of the edge players this year.  I mean, with his speed and length and power, I think his uninjured/unsuspended floor is an 8 sack a year player that is also good vs the run. I could easily see him as a 12 sack a year player with some 15-18 sack seasons. 

 

I agree with you that Burns looks more explosive & nimble in highlights, but he had a lower pressure % v inferior competition ... though he’s younger & also an elite athlete. Sweats length & explosion are difficult to replicate in preparation, he’s a unique prospect, I had him in the top 5 of this class before the draft, he obliterated the sr bowl drills & looked like a pro v college kids during the game, he’s got everything you would hope to build in a pass rusher ... and, as you noted, he holds up v the run. Playing for Bob Shoop you’re going to have to play with more discipline than Burns did at MSU, there may have been more Sweat could have produced if he just flew to the ball all game, it’s not entirely unlike Payne last year, people doubted his ability to rush the passer because they didn’t understand his assignments, which is understandable; sometimes a guy looks like he’s quitting on a play, or lacks explosion, because his job is to take something away, not to pursue the ball.  

 

Edited by volsmet
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36 minutes ago, volsmet said:

 

I agree with you that Burns looks more explosive & nimble in highlights, but he had a lower pressure % v inferior competition ... though he’s younger & also an elite athlete. Sweats length & explosion are difficult to replicate in preparation, he’s a unique prospect, I had him in the top 5 of this class before the draft, he obliterated the sr bowl drills & looked like a pro v college kids during the game, he’s got everything you would hope to build in a pass rusher ... and, as you noted, he holds up v the run. Playing for Bob Shoop you’re going to have to play with more discipline than Burns did at MSU, there may have been more Sweat could have produced if he just flew to the ball all game, it’s not entirely unlike Payne last year, people doubted his ability to rush the passer because they didn’t understand his assignments, which is understandable; sometimes a guy looks like he’s quitting on a play, or lacks explosion, because his job is to take something away, not to pursue the ball.  

 

 

Looks may be a little deceiving with regards to explosion. With Sweat's length, I think he looks just a little bit more like a long strider as he moves. I do think Burns bends a little better. Upon further review, I don't think that outside of bend, that Burns is better in any other facet than Sweat, other than being younger. Sweat really explodes off the line. Sweat is much better with his hands. He's much stronger. Obviously much longer. I love it that we have seen Sweat pancake Tytus Howard and Dalton Risner. He looks good against top competition. 


I still like Burns, but I worry that there are going to be games where he just gets enveloped and is invisible. Someone posted game tape of a second tier OT prospect playing FSU, and that prospect erased burns. Burns is also going to be someone that will, at least initially, be a target in the run game. 

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1 hour ago, Anselmheifer said:

 


I still like Burns, but I worry that there are going to be games where he just gets enveloped and is invisible. Someone posted game tape of a second tier OT prospect playing FSU, and that prospect erased burns. Burns is also going to be someone that will, at least initially, be a target in the run game. 

 

That was me during a bit of our debate, the OT was Max Scharping. 

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1 hour ago, volsmet said:

 

That was me during a bit of our debate, the OT was Max Scharping. 

 

Yes. Scharping made Burns look like a late round pick. 

 

I just posted this in another thread:

 

"Looks like NFL.com listed Montez Sweat's 10 yard split as 1.50 flat. Not sure if it's true. I've also seen it listed as 1.55 and 1.54

 

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001021021/article/2019-nfl-scouting-combine-twelve-numbers-that-matter-most

At 6-5 3/4 and 260 pounds, Montez Sweat's first 10-yard split on the 40-yard dash was 1.50 seconds. This helped him earn a 4.41-second 40 time, which is the fastest by a defensive lineman since 2003. The average 10-yard split for a Pro Bowl edge rusher since 2003? 1.67 seconds. The Mississippi State product's three-cone result of 7.0 seconds also hit a predictive benchmark (7.0 or lower) that flags for above-average and elite NFL production."


Anyone know how to best confirm the official number? I would assume NFL.com would get the number right. Maybe it was adjusted at a later date?

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41 minutes ago, Anselmheifer said:

 

Yes. Scharping made Burns look like a late round pick. 

 

I just posted this in another thread:

 

"Looks like NFL.com listed Montez Sweat's 10 yard split as 1.50 flat. Not sure if it's true. I've also seen it listed as 1.55 and 1.54

 

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001021021/article/2019-nfl-scouting-combine-twelve-numbers-that-matter-most

At 6-5 3/4 and 260 pounds, Montez Sweat's first 10-yard split on the 40-yard dash was 1.50 seconds. This helped him earn a 4.41-second 40 time, which is the fastest by a defensive lineman since 2003. The average 10-yard split for a Pro Bowl edge rusher since 2003? 1.67 seconds. The Mississippi State product's three-cone result of 7.0 seconds also hit a predictive benchmark (7.0 or lower) that flags for above-average and elite NFL production."


Anyone know how to best confirm the official number? I would assume NFL.com would get the number right. Maybe it was adjusted at a later date?

 

During the combine most had him at 1.55, by draft time there were 1.50s, but I don’t know what the official time is. Ras needs to update our guy, move him into that 9.99 category. 

 

 

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