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I think it's better that Haskins threw all 3 ints to Moreland than him throwing 3 ints to seperate defenders. This to me tells me that Moreland is no joke and probably shouldnt have the ball thrown in his direction. 

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On 5/28/2019 at 8:43 PM, volsmet said:

. Imo, it would be wise to start him every other week to start the season & evaluate things more closely & prepare more thoroughly as he adjusts to the NFL. Perfect way to use Alex Smith, let them work together on Keenum week.
 

Mr. Met is on to something here. I had proposed something similar earlier in this thread, that a Rookie QB start/sit did not have to be an all-or-nothing concept. I had proposed that IF  Haskins looked to be ready, that he should play, with Case stepping in to cover for a series if he makes a bad mistake. While Case is on the field, utilize that time to coach-up DH. What mistake he made, what the defense was showing, and what the better options were. The brief skull session can be headed up by the trio of Grudes, O'Connell, and even Alex Smith.  I remember when Cousins was developing that he would sometimes develop the famous deer in the headlights look of being overwhelmed once he threw a turnover. I'm hoping that during the time-out session, it would allow DH to refocus and learn how to address a mistake while still fresh in his mind, yet also instill confidence knowing that Case was only taking the reins for a brief stint for a good coaching session. Allow the rescue kitten to let the inner lioness loose. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, bowhunter said:

Mr. Met is on to something here. I had proposed something similar earlier in this thread, that a Rookie QB start/sit did not have to be an all-or-nothing concept. I had proposed that IF  Haskins looked to be ready, that he should play, with Case stepping in to cover for a series if he makes a bad mistake. While Case is on the field, utilize that time to coach-up DH. What mistake he made, what the defense was showing, and what the better options were. The brief skull session can be headed up by the trio of Grudes, O'Connell, and even Alex Smith.  I remember when Cousins was developing that he would sometimes develop the famous deer in the headlights look of being overwhelmed once he threw a turnover. I'm hoping that during the time-out session, it would allow DH to refocus and learn how to address a mistake while still fresh in his mind, yet also instill confidence knowing that Case was only taking the reins for a brief stint for a good coaching session. Allow the rescue kitten to let the inner lioness loose. 

 

I think this would have the opposite effect, compared to what you want. "Make a mistake? You're benched until we go over it (like the HC, OC, or even QB Coach has time for that while another QB is on the field!), then you can go back in, cold, to a different game situation than you left, while messing up the other guy's rhythm". That would be horrendous. 

 

Having a short memory for bad throws as a QB is sometimes natural, and sometimes a learned skill. But this is not the way to encourage that. 

Edited by ConnSKINS26
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You don't stream quarterbacks.  They are the leader of your offense.  They need to be a constant.

 

Whoever wins the qb competition needs to be the starter, period.  If it's Haskins, great. If it's Case or Colt, so be it.  You can't give the job to someone who doesn't win it just because you either think he's the future of are trying to tank, or because you're trying to shield that future guy from getting hit and making mistakes early in his career.  You will poison your locker room and ruin your culture of competition that you have to establish to be successful if you give the job to a guy who doesn't win it.  The rest of the team is there in oractice.  They know which guy gives them the best chance to win this year.  They will clam up and play for themselves if they think you're not trying to win this season.  Every year is a contract year for everyone in the NFL.  They can't afford to look past this season.

 

 

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39 minutes ago, ConnSKINS26 said:

 

I think this would have the opposite effect, compared to what you want. "Make a mistake? You're benched until we go over it (like the HC, OC, or even QB Coach has time for that while another QB is on the field!), then you can go back in, cold, to a different game situation than you left, while messing up the other guy's rhythm". That would be horrendous. 

 

Having a short memory for bad throws as a QB is sometimes natural, and sometimes a learned skill. But this is not the way to encourage that. 

 

I wouldn’t take the guy out in the middle of the game, if you communicate a plan it won’t impact him, he just needs to know what’s expected & prepare. Watching a vet while getting 8-11 starts could be ideal for a guy who hasn’t played much & has to win from the pocket. I often have ideas that are unpopular in the moment, but people come around on them. 

 

Start him in the opener, get him an extra week to look at what he did & prepare for week 3. Then adjust the plan based on how well he’s picking things up, and if he’s not he won’t feel embarrassed on the bench if he knows it’s the plan going in. Guarantee 8 starts with room for more, you never actually bench him, he never has to look over his shoulder, he gets adjusted to the NFL and learns from both experience & from watching a veteran up close. Perfect. Then in 2020, the team is his.

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10 hours ago, Skinsinparadise said:

wow for Moreland

 

 

 

Hail ya the women of Washington are for Moreland..I imagine every one is after the day he had lol

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Coaches said none of the QB's had much time to throw, all day.

So, you gotta give credit to guys like Sweat, who were applying the pressure, that helped force those interceptions by Moreland.

Going against mostly 2nd or 3rd string OL probably helped too.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Burgundy Yoda said:

I think it's better that Haskins threw all 3 ints to Moreland than him throwing 3 ints to seperate defenders. This to me tells me that Moreland is no joke and probably shouldnt have the ball thrown in his direction. 

 

Nothing against #JimmyINT, but maybe as a 7th he is the guy most busting his hump in OTAs.  Do we want Norman and other vets going balls to the wall in May?

 

That's the beauty of young players, they are hungry, and pushing the fat cats.  When the season starts, is when the vets eat.

Edited by RandyHolt
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Posted (edited)

A lot of love among draft geeks who were at the East-West game during the off season for Moreland.  Moreland was one of the standout players in practices and then got invited to the Senior Bowl. I was listening to the Draft Network podcast rap up of the draft a few days ago and they also highlighted Moreland.  So maybe they got something there.  Will see.  As for Haskins, yesterday to me is a sign that he (or any QB for that matter) needs to have a healthy O line this year.  I know Trent doesn't do voluntary mini camp but obviously there is a downside for the offense when they practice without him.  And as one beat guy said the other day as much as we can tout Trent being a great player and thus we should let him come to camp whenever he wants to -- the dude still gets hurts just about every year where its almost a slam dunk certainty -- so maybe his training isn't perfect.  Granted maybe his injuries are always unpreventable.  Still he just about always gets hurt.  This time I think a Trent injury will be felt more with Ty now in Buffalo. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Skinsinparadise
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"Dwayne is still processing everything," Gruden said. "Everything is coming in fast and he's trying to process the formations and the run concepts and the protections. So it's all new to him in terms of transferring what I say or what Coach O'Connell says to the huddle. There might be one key word that he messes up, which is a critical -- 14 instead of 15 -- that's a big word. So we have to just clean him up a little bit and slow him up and be patient. But it will come for him, and it will come soon."

For what it's worth, Haskins -- a traditional pocket passer in college -- was on the go quite a bit Wednesday, often running with the ball downfield on what seemed to be designed looks. "Whatever they want to do, I'm ready to do," he said when asked about the running, a little surprised himself to be toting the ball that much.

Haskins seems eager for as much guidance and information as possible and was able to shake off his missteps. He said he is all ball this spring, staying late at the facility and limited any social activities. "I'm spending all of my time on football," Haskins said. "All of my time. I'll be here until late and by the time I get home I'm just watching film with my girlfriend and my dog. That's it."

It seems to be working.

"He's good, man," veteran receiver Josh Doctson said of Haskins. "He's a quick learner, I would say. I don't know what they did over there at Ohio State, but they were doing something right, because he's come in here and he doesn't really hesitate. He's real quick and he makes decisions quick, and he throws with a lot of accuracy."

For now, Gruden is keeping the reps between Keenum and Haskins equal -- in a normal 16-play practice script they will each get seven, with Josh Woodrum settling for one or two snaps -- albeit Keenum was with the presumptive starter for now. Surely, Haskins will get his chance to work with them this summer, and what he does with those throws and in the preseason games could rekindle the fervor among a storied fan population that has been beaten into ambivalence by the continued foibles of the Snyder administration.

https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/dwayne-haskins-looks-the-part-at-otas-but-time-will-tell-if-hes-ready-to-be-washingtons-long-awaited-qb-savior/

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9 hours ago, ConnSKINS26 said:

 

I think this would have the opposite effect, compared to what you want. "Make a mistake? You're benched until we go over it (like the HC, OC, or even QB Coach has time for that while another QB is on the field!), then you can go back in, cold, to a different game situation than you left, while messing up the other guy's rhythm". That would be horrendous. 

 

Having a short memory for bad throws as a QB is sometimes natural, and sometimes a learned skill. But this is not the way to encourage that. 

Early in his career, We all watched Cousins look shell shocked at times  during his maturation, in fact he lost his job more than once.  Instead of making our young QB continue to lose confidence, take him out for a series and coach him up. Reinstill confidence and re-set his mentality. We see all the time in other sports, starting point guard begins to look rattled so coach pulls him for a few minutes, has him sit next to him on the bench to calm him and let him regain focus and confidence. It's a much better option than having him fearing losing his job or self doubting. A good boss will take such opportunities to talk with a struggling employee. This does have to be an all-or-none option. He can be your starting QB and also be pulled for an occasional series. Allow him to learn from his mistakes instead of fearing the repercussions.

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15 minutes ago, bowhunter said:

Early in his career, We all watched Cousins look shell shocked at times  during his maturation, in fact he lost his job more than once.  Instead of making our young QB continue to lose confidence, take him out for a series and coach him up. Reinstill confidence and re-set his mentality. We see all the time in other sports, starting point guard begins to look rattled so coach pulls him for a few minutes, has him sit next to him on the bench to calm him and let him regain focus and confidence. It's a much better option than having him fearing losing his job or self doubting. A good boss will take such opportunities to talk with a struggling employee. This does have to be an all-or-none option. He can be your starting QB and also be pulled for an occasional series. Allow him to learn from his mistakes instead of fearing the repercussions.

You coach him up at half-time and in between offensive series.  You dont pull QBs out for a series of offensive drives to "coach him up".

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26 minutes ago, RawRebel said:

You coach him up at half-time and in between offensive series.  You dont pull QBs out for a series of offensive drives to "coach him up".

I don't? If I gave a rats ass about develolping  him, Why wouldn't I? If the rookie looks bewildered, I think it would hasten his development to pull him for a play, a series, or maybe never. All the talk we hear about some rookie QBs failing to reach their potential due to being "thrown to the wolves" unnecessarily can be mitigated with an approach such as this. You're not "punishing" the kid for a mistake, especially if he knows that he's the starter (assuming he truly won it.)  Instead you're allowing him to learn and re-focus for a brief period of time. Don't yank for a bad throw, but if/when he appears to have lost his confidence. Everyone has a first day, mistakes will happen, but letting the mistakes define you is a  bad MOJO for developing a rookie QB. If that were to occur, no need to leave a rattled kitten on the field. Show him the picture of the lion he will become.  

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God no **** I didn't think about that...the skins not putting Haskins on a pedestal and making him earn the job...both rg3 and Haskins were first round QBs..sure different situations but the skins are handling this different which i believe could pay dividends.

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Fans on Twitter panicking over Haskins’ interceptions and minor issues calling plays in the huddle remind me of the Chiefs fans panicking over Training Camp Mahomes last year, who was a sophomore, not a rookie.  I’m actually extremely happy Haskins is making these mistakes early.  That’s how this is supposed to work. Hope it pays off like it did for Mahomes. 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/ftw.usatoday.com/2018/08/chiefs-patrick-mahomes-training-camp-interceptions/amp

 

The Kansas City Chiefs traded their Pro Bowl quarterback to the Redskins earlier this year and all-in on 22-year-old Patrick Mahomes as the future of the franchise, but the former Texas Tech star is worrying some fans with his slightly erratic play in training camp.

 

Mahomes, who has one career start but is unquestionably the QB1 in Kansas City, has thrown seven interceptions in six practices so far this year.

 

Via ESPN:

“Mahomes made another error Wednesday, once calling the wrong play in the huddle. As a result, his receivers were running routes he wasn’t expecting and he threw an interception.

 

‘Being able to get in and out of the huddle, calling the right plays and then not making a bad play worse is something I’ve got to keep getting better at,’ Mahomes said.”

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21 minutes ago, HTTRDynasty said:

Fans on Twitter panicking over Haskins’ interceptions and minor issues calling plays in the huddle remind me of the Chiefs fans panicking over Training Camp Mahomes last year, who was a sophomore, not a rookie.  I’m actually extremely happy Haskins is making these mistakes early.  That’s how this is supposed to work. Hope it pays off like it did for Mahomes. 

 

 

I also think there is upside for him facing adversity early.  One danger I think for any rookie in the NFL is to think that things come too easy.    It doesn't seem to be Haskins style to have that mindset.   If I recall RG3 said after one of the preseason games in 2012, things are a lot easier than he thought it would be in the NFL or something like that.  So it's good to stay hungry and humble. 

 

Also when you got 3 out of your 5 starting O line out for practice -- plus a bunch of young receivers to throw to its not easy.

 

 

 

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Our passing game may be closely aligned with the nickname for Manute Bol because of a thin WR group

 

Dinka Dunker

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, bowhunter said:

Early in his career, We all watched Cousins look shell shocked at times  during his maturation, in fact he lost his job more than once.  Instead of making our young QB continue to lose confidence, take him out for a series and coach him up. Reinstill confidence and re-set his mentality. We see all the time in other sports, starting point guard begins to look rattled so coach pulls him for a few minutes, has him sit next to him on the bench to calm him and let him regain focus and confidence. It's a much better option than having him fearing losing his job or self doubting. A good boss will take such opportunities to talk with a struggling employee. This does have to be an all-or-none option. He can be your starting QB and also be pulled for an occasional series. Allow him to learn from his mistakes instead of fearing the repercussions.

 

I have long theorized that frequent changes at QB is something for coaches to consider. Look at the bust rate of QBs, who never run risk of getting yanked for a bad play and not even a bad day. Look at the amount of poor QB play in general from players not in fear of being benched. Coaches would rather have their offense look like crap for 16 games than run risk of a QB controversy. Yet subbing is common place in most all sports, including football.

 

Sure OL and WRs want consistency in cadence, throws etc, but tough **** for them humans dominate at adapting and last I checked, football players are human too. 

 

How many times have we seen a QB go in, and dominate. Change simply seems to wake up the offense.  You could see it with RG3---> Cousins. All of a sudden, it looked like our OL gave a crap - anyone else ever seen this? A QB has to be a leader that ALL the players believe in to be above sitting out a series.

 

I feel like some are hesitant to sit a QB for a series, rest of game etc out of fear it will ruin them; that they will take the ball and go home to sulk.

 

 

Edited by RandyHolt
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3 hours ago, bowhunter said:

Early in his career, We all watched Cousins look shell shocked at times  during his maturation, in fact he lost his job more than once.  Instead of making our young QB continue to lose confidence, take him out for a series and coach him up. Reinstill confidence and re-set his mentality. We see all the time in other sports, starting point guard begins to look rattled so coach pulls him for a few minutes, has him sit next to him on the bench to calm him and let him regain focus and confidence. It's a much better option than having him fearing losing his job or self doubting. A good boss will take such opportunities to talk with a struggling employee. This does have to be an all-or-none option. He can be your starting QB and also be pulled for an occasional series. Allow him to learn from his mistakes instead of fearing the repercussions.

 

While its a Novel idea.. it simply wont work in pro sports. QB is the most important position on the field and being named starter means getting majority of the reps in practice and then all the reps in the game. 

If you alternate QBs you will need to change your O game plan each week around each guys strengths and weaknesses and that guy will have to get majority of the practice reps that week which will slow the development of the guy not playing that week because all coaches will focus on the starting qb for that week.

Furthermore.. ego plays a huge part in the NFL .. like it or not. If qb is not playing it will effect his ego and confidence going forward. Not to mention the inevitable split in the locker room where players will take sides when one guy is playing well and the other not as well. 

 

The bust rate for QBs is just as high if not higher than every other position.. and if you think the guy is the future you have to give him every opportunity to play, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes and hopefully grow in the process. You learn much better by playing.. than by watching from the sidelines. 

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16 minutes ago, oraphus said:

 

While its a Novel idea.. it simply wont work in pro sports. QB is the most important position on the field and being named starter means getting majority of the reps in practice and then all the reps in the game. 

If you alternate QBs you will need to change your O game plan each week around each guys strengths and weaknesses and that guy will have to get majority of the practice reps that week which will slow the development of the guy not playing that week because all coaches will focus on the starting qb for that week.

Furthermore.. ego plays a huge part in the NFL .. like it or not. If qb is not playing it will effect his ego and confidence going forward. Not to mention the inevitable split in the locker room where players will take sides when one guy is playing well and the other not as well. 

 

The bust rate for QBs is just as high if not higher than every other position.. and if you think the guy is the future you have to give him every opportunity to play, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes and hopefully grow in the process. You learn much better by playing.. than by watching from the sidelines. 

 

I agree with everything except the very last statement. Each player is different. I can see a case being developed for both approaches. It's really up to him and how he learns best. He has to have a certain level of understanding of the playbook and how to run the offence. By all accounts he is doing everything he can to be ready. But the reason you have a guy like Case Keenum in case he is not ready. Nothing wrong with needing to watch a few games from the sideline to see the speed of the game, or an entire year if it helps him most long term.  

 

I definitely agree once you put him in, leave him in. Let him get his lumps and learn. 

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