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Welcome to the Redskins Dwayne Haskins QB Ohio State

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Posted (edited)

 

 

2 hours ago, Llevron said:

 

There are very few coaches that are talented enough to pick their own players in the NFL. Gruden is not one of them. 

 

Hmm..  Scot McCoughin for his faults is an extremely talented at player evaluation and highlighted Jay's abilities to @Skinsinparadise personally if I remember. Also, Marvin Lewis, Bill Polian and others have lauded Jay's ability to evaluate players. 

 

People can make up all the reasons they want - and some of them may be fair - but the one QB he got to choose (if you are to believe reports) had the team 6-3 and in first place. But again, no one really knows who is making the decisions. 

 

What we do not know is who is doing the player evaluations. But the one constant if people are being honest is that since Jay joined the team in 2014 the drafts have been better, in many cases much better. The scout teams under Bruce have remained relatively the same and with Shanny the drafts were not very good. 

 

Sorry, but you would have to provide tangible evidence of your statement. And the real problem with that is we do not know who is making what call. 

 

Edited by goskins10
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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, HigSkin said:

I've been seeing a lot of chatter that one concern with Haskins was his weight.  When watching his pro day he looked gassed.

 

Does anyone know if he has a hard time controlling weight and being in shape?

 

He does seem thick, hence the comparisons to Ben. When Jay has him under center, and hurry up is shelved, we shouldn't have any worries.  If we do run HU, we always call time out because it is so successful, that we get ahead of ourselves.

 

I miss the era when players would all just show up out of shape, and camp was to get folks into shape.  Now if a guy took a few months off to rest/heal his body, its a major OTA distraction. The coach gets asked about it at every turn.

 

Just do like me, sport a muumuu 24/7

 

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Edited by RandyHolt
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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, goskins10 said:

Sorry, but you would have to provide tangible evidence of your statement. And the real problem with that is we do not know who is making what call. 

 

I dont have any other than he was never given the responsibility (so - he cant) but thats a technicality so I will go with your presumption/ argument that he can. Im cool with that. EDIT: i should add, I never heard that information before and im glad you shared it with me. 

 

I would still assume Jay isnt the one making the call as Bruce says its a "team effort" or some crazy **** like that. Which to me just means yea I will listen to you. For now. 

Edited by Llevron
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Posted (edited)

When I hear "extremely quick and accurate on short and intermediate passes", I think: Tom Brady.  Dude built a GOAT, HOF career on short and intermediate routes. 

Edited by Stadium-Armory
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1 minute ago, Llevron said:

 

I dont have any other than he was never given the responsibility (so - he cant) but thats a technicality so I will go with your presumption/ argument that he can. Im cool with that. 

 

I would still assume Jay isnt the one making the call as Bruce says its a "team effort" or some crazy **** like that. Which to me just means yea I will listen to you. For now. 

 

I agree with the last part and is one of the major problems I and many others have with the FO. This we all make the call there is no one person making the final decision is bull****. Someone is making the calls. My guess is it's Bruce. 

 

Based on that, my first thought about why Jay has not been given that responsibility (assuming he has not anyway) is more about Bruce's ego than anything. He likes this arrangement because he can take credit for anything that goes well and blame someone else for any failures. 


But I am admittedly speculating - which honestly I hate to do. I like having the facts. And to his credit, Bruce has been able to control the narrative out of the Redskins - both good or bad. The way he uses it is sometimes garbage, well most of the times garbage. But that is a different conversation entirely. 

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9 minutes ago, RandyHolt said:

I miss the era when players would all just show up out of shape, and camp was to get folks into shape.  

 

 

That era never really existed. Camp was to get players in football shape - but if a player turned up out of condition and needed to spend the first few weeks getting into basic shape that put them behind the curve or get you injured which had an even worse impact. There is a great book called "Paper Lion' written by a journalist who took part in a Detroit Lions training camp as a back up to the  back up QB in the 1950's. I recall a section there about a lineman being cut and coach lamenting about how it killed him that this guy had shown up out of shape and given himself no chance.

 

Now that said I doubt Bobby Lane did many wind sprints or anyone worried about his 40 time. Then again he drank himself to death at age 59.

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2 minutes ago, goskins10 said:

which honestly I hate to do

 

Its all we got until the passes start flying though. So I hope we work it out. But until then this part is fun. This is the most into it i have been since Kirk left us to die. Which is probably the point. But I can hope hahahahacrycrycryhahahahaha

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, MartinC said:

 

That era never really existed. Camp was to get players in football shape

I don’t know, man. ‘In shape’ is a relative term. Fitness is a science today that requires year round training and diet. Little of that was applied in my time other than gulping gobs of protein shakes and running gassers and hills and Oklahomas on those wretchedly hot August days, 6 days a week for 6-8 hours a day with the coaches screaming profanities in my ear. Each day, one or two teammates would pass out and coaches would laud them, making them positive examples to the rest of the team. What was then hailed as toughness and effort is today a felony. 

Edited by JaxJoe
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On 4/26/2019 at 9:42 AM, NickyJ said:

On top of interior pressure, Moses always plays hurt, and Trent is good for a couple games missed. LG is a huge question mark at best. When Trent goes down, the entire left side is going to be a turnstile. it's going to be ugly for whoever is there, doubly so for a QB who isn't mobile.

 

You just sold how good Alex Smith really was!

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, MartinC said:

 

That era never really existed. Camp was to get players in football shape ...

 

So... that era kind of existed.  Maybe much more so at least compared to now. Thanks for sharing info on that book you read.

 

But I feel like all the stars got a pass and probably still do. I just cannot recall hearing a story about a player being out of shape, at least not until the era it was vogue to join a gym with a lifetime membership, and then regret it sooner than later. All I know is gyms weren't really a thing in my first 15 years as a fan, Sonny had a big belly (Billy a bandaid), and I would wager football players spent their off seasons more likely to be drinking more beer vs doing any cardio.  

t_39971.jpg

 

Edited by RandyHolt
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6 hours ago, Riggo#44 said:

 

Because of the reports that Snyder and Allen wanted Haskins, and Smith-Gruden did not. If that's accurate (and Lord knows it's entirely possible Snyder and Allen shoehorned this pick), then it gives me pause. When has Snyder ever forced his way and it turned out well?

 

Snyder has been so bad as an owner we are automatically conditioned to react negatively to whenever he is mentioned.

 

Haskins is talented, I've read a lot about him, and seems like he has tremendous potential--but we need to be patient with him. If Snyder goes full Snyder and forces him on the field, it won't turn out well.

 

I get that but my point was that, whether or not it's true Snyder forced this pick above the opinion of the "football people", there are a LOT of reasons why Haskins is a good pick (for damn near any team) and why Snyder would have wanted him. Or Snyder and Allen, or Snyder, Allen and Williams, depending on which tweet "report" you wanna go with lol...the idea that in Snyder's mind, his son going to high school with Haskins trumped all the legitimate positive reasons for drafting Haskins at #15 is insane. I assume most throwing that idea into the convo are doing it without actually thinking it's true, but I've read my share of posts and tweets that are being serious...

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18 minutes ago, JaxJoe said:

I don’t know, man. ‘In shape’ is a relative term. Fitness is a science today that requires year round training and diet. Little of that was applied in my time other than gulping gobs of protein shakes and running gassers and hills and Oklahomas on those wretchedly hot August days, 6 days a week for 6-8 hours a day with the coaches screaming profanities in my ear. Each day, one or two teammates would pass out and coaches would laud them, making them positive examples to the rest of the team. What was then hailed as toughness and effort is today a felony. 

 

You just gave me flash-backs to pre-sesaon training at 'soccer' in England. We spent the first two weeks running uo and down sand hills at a place called Southport which is on the coast in NW England. There is a lot of my DNA in those hills ...

 

Same with football - a hell of a lot of running and conditioning with not a lot of difference between position groups. It is certainly more scientific these days but the basic requirement of being fit to take part on football activity when you walk into camp has not changed I don't think.

14 minutes ago, RandyHolt said:

 

So... that era kind of existed.  Maybe much more so at least compared to now. Thanks for sharing info on that book you read.

 

But I feel like all the stars got a pass and probably still do. I just cannot recall hearing a story about a player being out of shape, at least not until the era it was vogue to join a gym with a lifetime membership, and then regret it sooner than later. All I know is gyms weren't really a thing in my first 15 years as a fan, Sonny had a big belly (Billy a bandaid), and I would wager football players spent their off seasons more likely to be drinking more beer vs doing any cardio.  

 

 

All true - I think there have always been slightly different rules for QBs and kickers - once you make the team and have produced that is. But if you were a WR, RB or corner or LB you had better turn up to camp ready to run. 

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1 hour ago, goskins10 said:

Also, Lovie Smith, Bill Polian and others have lauded Jay's ability to evaluate players. 

 

People can make up all the reasons they want - and some of them may be fair - but the one QB he got to choose (if you are to believe reports) had the team 6-3 and in first place. But again, no one really knows who is making the decisions. 

 

What we do not know is who is doing the player evaluations. But the one constant if people are being honest is that since Jay joined the team in 2014 the drafts have been better, in many cases much better. The scout teams under Bruce have remained relatively the same and with Shanny the drafts were not very good. 

All excellent points.  Another supporting argument is he coached under Marvin Lewis who drafted his own playerd, in Cincy.  Say what you want about Marvin as a coach but he snagged talented and contributing players in his drafts. 

 

Not to mention he was able to have some success in a poorly run franchise with an owner who holds back the team.

 

Working underneath Lewis showed Jay an idea of what to look for in terms of drafting a player. 

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On 4/28/2019 at 7:30 PM, Blue Collar Skins said:

I hope we don't rush him. Let him sit behind Case this year and take the reigns next year. Get extra coaching from Alex and Colt as well.

 

It’s reins not reigns. Haskins will start or Gruden can pack up now 

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3 minutes ago, Otis Wonsley Posse said:

 

It’s reins not reigns. Haskins will start or Gruden can pack up now 

 

Gruden's not going to look very smart if Fletcher Cox breaks our rookie QB in half week 1.

 

Haskins only started 1 season in his career, he'll need time.

 

I predict we'll see him week 6 after the Patriots game.

 

Training camp will be interesting this year though, no doubt Keenum wants to start.

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1 hour ago, Bishop Hammer said:

All excellent points.  Another supporting argument is he coached under Marvin Lewis who drafted his own playerd, in Cincy.  Say what you want about Marvin as a coach but he snagged talented and contributing players in his drafts. 

 

Not to mention he was able to have some success in a poorly run franchise with an owner who holds back the team.

 

Working underneath Lewis showed Jay an idea of what to look for in terms of drafting a player. 

 

Actually, I was thinking Marvin Lewis when I typed Lovie Smith...  🙂     Thanks for the memory jog and the additional input. 

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Posted (edited)

PFF has been on this for awhile that Haskins and Bradford are similar.  I haven't really studied Bradford but he seems at least physically different than Haskins.  According to their metrics Haskins and Bradford's strengths and weaknesses apparently match up really well.  I am not arguing the point myself.  Just noticing PFF is pushing it and that tweet isn't their first push of it. 

 

 

 

Edited by Skinsinparadise

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The Giants done messed up LOL

 

http://www.espn.com/nfl/draft2019/story/_/id/26574799/why-giants-draft-dwayne-haskins-eli-manning-successor

 

As a one-year starter at Ohio State who went 13-1 last season, Haskins completed 70 percent of his passes and threw for a Big Ten-record 4,831 yards and 50 touchdowns, or eight more touchdowns than the combined total Tom Brady and Drew Brees threw for in their final Big Ten seasons.

At 6-foot-3, 231 pounds, Haskins is a big pocket passer with an explosive arm who lives in the film room and who has an advanced pre-snap ability to read defenses and adjust protection. He comes from an extended family of police officers and pastors, and from a home governed by a mother, Tamara, a financial adviser, and father, an entrepreneur promoting Christian and gospel music, who stressed religion, education and discipline.

 

Shawn Springs, the retired 13-year NFL veteran and longtime Haskins family friend and mentor, first saw Dwayne Jr. as a seventh-grader throwing 50-yard passes in a New Jersey football camp. Springs was amazed at his arm strength and accuracy, and he correctly predicted that Haskins would someday grow into a Heisman Trophy finalist. Now the founder and CEO of Windpact, an impact technology company, Springs started telling people before Haskins enrolled at Ohio State that Warren Moon and Tom Brady were the only quarterbacks he ever played with who were better than Dwayne Jr.

"Tom Brady is one of those guys who's a machine in how he's always trying to understand the other team," said Springs, who played with the Patriots in 2009. "Dwayne is that type of machine when it comes to understanding the game."

Haskins' coach at Bullis, Pat Cilento, echoed that sentiment, saying Haskins' considerable intellect earned him the right to have full control of the offense; Cilento had not handed that kind of authority to previous quarterbacks. But as much as Haskins impressed with his playcalling, Cilento was struck most by his quarterback's style of leadership on and off the field.

 

"When a lot of kids were going out at night," Cilento said, "he'd go bowling. ... And he would always include everybody wherever he'd go, on the football field or at one of Tamia's shows. He would want to throw to 10 different receivers, and if a kid was sitting by himself in the cafeteria, he'd go over and sit with him. I think his family has done an unbelievable job of raising him."

Haskins' talent was as obvious as his character. Urban Meyer called his recruit as good a quarterback and fundamental passer as he'd ever seen at that age. Wearing No. 7, Haskins would come off the bench in 2017 -- after an injury to starter J.T. Barrett -- and lead the Buckeyes to a come-from-behind victoryover Michigan in Ann Arbor, before shredding the Wolverines with six touchdown passes a year later in a blowout victory in Columbus.

A couple of days after that Michigan game, Gerry DiNardo, a Big Ten Network analyst who coached college football for the better part of three decades, sat with Haskins for more than an hour for a film review. The quarterback did not know in advance what plays would be reviewed or what questions would be asked, and DiNardo said he came away from the session thinking Haskins' grasp of pass-protection concepts was "extraordinary." The analyst also cited Haskins' desire to avoid being sacked even once because he wanted to help his offensive line pitch a shutout against a defensive coordinator as widely respected as Michigan's Don Brown.

"I thought that was the unselfish part of his personality," DiNardo said, "and I don't think he was just saying that. ... One thing I learned in an hour with Dwayne is, intellectually, he knows the game and he can teach the game. I've interviewed coaches in the past and after five minutes I knew I wasn't going to hire them because they took too long to explain a formation, or they weren't comfortable in their own skin in what they were teaching. Dwayne explains things very quickly. He knows what he's talking about."

 

Day spent two NFL seasons under Chip Kelly with the Eagles (where he worked with current Giants coach Pat Shurmur) and the 49ers, and he said Haskins' personality, intelligence and low-maintenance lifestyle will earn him near-instant credibility in an NFL locker room. Haskins also has upside on his side; he has started only 14 games. "I was lucky enough to be around Matt Ryan at this age," said Day, a former Boston College assistant, "and to be around a natural talent like Sam Bradford and others. And Dwayne's ceiling is as high as I've been around. I still think he's just scratching the surface."

Day thought Haskins came of age in Ohio State's 52-51 overtime victory over Maryland, made possible by the quarterback's decision to keep the ball, lower his shoulder, and barrel into the end zone for his third touchdown run -- answering questions about his ability to will his team to victory and to hurt opponents with his feet, when necessary.

 

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Good article

 

http://www.espn.com/nfl/draft2019/story/_/id/26388916/tracing-roots-dwayne-haskins-football-journey

 

The long-ago memory hasn't faded. Dwayne Haskins was 10 years old. Driving rain. Best friend playing receiver. A Pop Warner football game against their New Jersey-area rivals. Trailing 7-6.

It was time.

"We need to move the ball and we were like, 'dang,' so we give it a try," said Rutgers receiver Mohamed Jabbie, Haskins' former teammate. "Dwayne throws me the best deep ball ever. I catch it right over my shoulder. The defender is right there. I will always remember that. It won the game."
 

And it stuck with both players.

 

"I threw a fade route to Mo and Mo took it to the house," Haskins said. "It was like a 25-, 30-yard throw. I didn't have a crazy strong arm back then, but he took it to the house."

That was the first year Haskins started playing quarterback, having abandoned his fullback and defensive-end duties. "I wanted to be more involved," he said.

EDITOR'S PICKS

Two things evident back then remain true: Haskins dazzled with his arm, and the early work he put into his game was paying off.

By the time the 2018 college football season began, Haskins was more than prepared to be the man. The Ohio State quarterback might have been a first-time starter, but he had spent the previous decade building to this moment. A year ago at this time, Haskins was working to beat out Joe Burrow for the starting job. He did. Then he flourished, throwing 50 touchdown passes and becoming a top-10 prospect for the NFL draft.

"I knew before the season I had the talent to play in the NFL," Haskins said at the scouting combine. "I know I'm a franchise quarterback."

Haskins later admitted he knew he would head to the NFL after three years of college. His first two seasons were spent behind J.T. Barrett, learning how to be a leader.

"He came a long way," Ohio State coach Ryan Day said, "in a short period of time."

It was like that in high school, too. Haskins didn't receive a scholarship offer until after his junior year -- from SMU. Then his status exploded after a strong showing at the Elite 11 camp the summer before his senior season. Haskins always emerged. The team that drafts him later this month will bank on him repeating that in the NFL. At one point he was viewed as the draft's top quarterback prospect, a position Kyler Murray now occupies.

Some teams aren't sold -- mainly because he started only 14 games -- and feel he'll have to sit at least a year. Even Day said, "I was hoping to have at least one more year with him. We were really going to go from there."

Haskins isn't a unanimous slam-dunk prospect. Still, he went from an inexperienced player to a Heisman finalist. ESPN draft analysts Mel Kiper Jr.and Todd McShay project him going No. 6 overall to the New York Giants in their latest mock drafts.

The beginning

 

Zack Hawkins, left, shown in eighth grade with Dwayne Haskins, saw greatness at an early age in his former teammate. "His attention to detail as an eighth grader was ridiculous," Hawkins said. Courtesy Haskins family

At the Darin Slack Academy camp in fifth grade, Haskins tested at the level of a 10th grader when it came to reading defenses. He attended camps and worked on drills with his father, Dwayne Sr., who often focused on avoiding pressure in the pocket.

"That kid was obsessed with football," said Jabbie, whose NFL-player uncle, Mohamed Sanu, also worked with Haskins. "He had a passion for the game. We were going outside and running routes like we were preparing for a college football season. Football and school were his two priorities. He was a football genius and a school nerd."

Former NFL cornerback Shawn Springs watched a middle-school Haskins star during a camp. Springs said he saw Haskins throw the ball "50 yards ... I'm not just talking about throwing it far, but accurately."

Springs developed a relationship with Haskins' father and would occasionally work with Haskins. He'd watch tape of his games and offer advice. Sometimes he'd see a play, provide a tip and then see that Haskins had made the adjustment himself in-game.

"Just basic stuff you'd tell an eighth grader, 'You've got to put more air on it when you throw the seam,'" Springs said, "and the next thing you know he's throwing it down the seam and he hits him right on stride.

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"He would ask me what Tom Brady was like and, 'How do I have to work?' He would soak it all up, 'Yep, OK, I get it, OK, next lesson.'"

In July 2011, Haskins, then listed at 5-foot-6, 150 pounds, played in the USA vs. the World game in Canton, Ohio. The players capped a week of practice with a game. Bryson Spinner was coaching for another USA football team at the event but noticed Haskins.

"The first time I saw Dwayne throw the ball I said, 'That kid has something special coming off his hand,'" said Spinner, who played quarterback at Virginia before transferring to Richmond. "He was a short, chubby kid. He was one of the youngest guys there, but he did not look like one of the younger guys there when the ball came out of his hand."

Another childhood friend, Zack Hawkins, was at that camp. He remembers one play Haskins kept telling them to "run it again; run it again; run it again."

"His attention to detail as an eighth grader was ridiculous," Hawkins said. "We did not move on from something until he got it exactly right. ... That desire carried over into everything he did."

High school

 

Doug Kapustin/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Midway through his freshman year of high school, Haskins, seeking a higher level of competition, and his family moved to Maryland so he could play at Bullis School in Potomac. The father of its football coach, Pat Cilento, had coached Springs in high school basketball. There remains an NFL connection today to the school: The son of Redskins owner Dan Snyder is a sophomore football player there and is friendly with Haskins.

Cilento remembered seeing Haskins, then about 5-foot-10, 190 pounds, throw for the first time that winter.

"The first thing you saw was how the ball jumped off his hands," Cilento said. "It was like, 'Wow, this kid is special.'"

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By this point, Haskins had already worked with multiple quarterbacks coaches, including George Whitfield. Haskins would carry a football in his backpack at Bullis, sometimes bringing it out in the hallway. School officials eventually asked him to leave the ball at home or in a locker.

Nobody told him to change his ways on the field. Cilento said Haskins would arrive early for sessions with receivers so he could perform footwork drills. If Haskins didn't like the way he threw a ball on a certain route, he would keep the receivers after practice.

"He'd sit there and throw it until he liked it, and that could be hours and the receivers would hate him," Cilento said. "He really paid attention to his mechanics."

Hawkins said, "We would just run posts after practice and he kept hitting the same exact spot and we'd keep running it until he hit that spot."

Impromptu throwing sessions at other times of the year helped as well. One group text from Haskins often prompted 20 others to gather -- including at times Stefon Diggs, then a college receiver at Maryland.

There's more: Three or four times a week, Haskins would work with Spinner. Sometimes they would meet at Spinner's facility in Tysons Corner, Virginia -- about 30 minutes from Bullis with no traffic -- or at the one in Columbia, Maryland, about 45 minutes away. Haskins and his dad -- and sometimes his mom and sister -- would arrive sometime after 9 p.m. for a session that would typically last an hour or two. Or more.

"There were definitely times I'd look at the clock and be like, 'My fiancée is about to kill me,'" Spinner said.

They'd work on Haskins' base; his footwork; using his entire body. Spinner wanted him to be "comfortable with the uncomfortable." They worked three to four times a week for the entire year.

"He had a different grind, a different type of focus," Spinner said. "After his first six or seven workouts, I would tell my closest friends that he's got Sunday potential. He was a sophomore in high school."

It wasn't just the physical side.

 

play

1:57

Haskins feeling good after pro day

Dwayne Haskins breaks down his pro day workout, the kind of offense he wants to play in and why he's ready for the NFL despite only 14 career starts.

"He would call me and be like, 'Coach, I'm watching the NFL Network and I saw such and such coverage. What do you think?'" Spinner said. "He was asking questions pros would ask. He was mature beyond his years when it came to football IQ. ... He came through the 7-on-7 circuit and we're playing against other five-star kids and big-name guys in the secondary and Dwayne is putting the ball in places [defenders] couldn't do anything about it."

By the time he was a senior, Haskins was calling his own plays. Once, on a fourth-and-8 against Episcopal High School, Haskins bypassed a throw designed for the right side, instead throwing a swing pass to the left that resulted in a touchdown.

"I said, 'Why?' and he said, 'The linebacker was tucked in and I thought we could beat him there,' and he did," Cilento said. "You could let him control it; he knows what he's doing. ... We gave him total control of the offense. With him everything was an RPO (run-pass option); he could throw it at any time. Sometimes you'd pull your hair out -- fourth-and-1 and he throws a quick screen. We got a first down. He was that kind of kid; very smart player."

As Haskins matured, his coaches altered the offense. They threw more vertical passes. They ran no-huddle. And they trusted him completely. On a third-and-goal with 12 seconds left in his conference championship game against Georgetown Prep, Haskins, who drove the team 75 yards in 91 seconds despite hobbling on a sprained ankle, took a snap on the right side and threw an out all the way to the other sideline. Touchdown.

Haskins wasn't perfect: Receivers would sometimes have to wait on deep throws, for example. But he displayed a willingness to make throws others wouldn't -- or couldn't. Cilento then shows a highlight from another game: a seam pass on which the receiver has a defensive back on his outside hip and a linebacker sprinting to his inside.

"He makes those receivers look very good," Cilento said. "Most high school quarterbacks don't make those throws. Too gun-shy. It's not a mindset, but a competitiveness and confidence."

Spinner said, "He always carried himself as confident and sure of himself and knew he belonged. He comes from a strong family background."

College

 

Dwayne Haskins with his parents, Dwayne Sr. and Tamara, when he signed with Ohio State. Courtesy Bullis School

Haskins told this story a few times: As a high school sophomore, he met Day when the future Ohio State coach was a Boston College assistant. Day asked him about protections; Haskins responded with basic answers. He later admitted having no clue about all that protections entailed.

"He just didn't have a lot of exposure to much of any of that," Day said. "To his credit, he picked it up quickly. He's a smart guy. He's a sponge."

But it took time, and Haskins pointed to one moment in mop-up duty against Illinois in 2017 that taught him a valuable lesson.

"I was just a young guy trying to get game reps," he said. "The very first play I didn't make the right protection call and I got sacked. I took it serious ever since."

That meant more film study; Haskins said he'd watch 10 extra hours of film per week during the season.

Dwayne Haskins

r478721_608x342_16-9.jpg

Position: QB
Height: 6-foot-3
Weight: 231 pounds
Team: Ohio State
Big Ten single-season records: Touchdown passes (50), passing yards (4,831), total offense (4,939 yards)
Awards: Big Ten Graham-George Offensive Player of the Year and Griese-Brees Quarterback of the Year. Finished third in Heisman Trophy voting. Two-time Ohio State scholar-athlete and a two-time Academic All-Big Ten honoree.

"When you look at the way he played down the stretch," Day said, "a lot of that was because of his understanding of protections, understanding when the ball was supposed to come out and understanding game management."

In last season's final four games -- against Maryland, Michigan, Northwestern and Washington -- Haskins threw for a combined 1,551 yards, 17 touchdowns and two interceptions.

"He's a rhythm player," Day said. "When he gets into a rhythm, he's as good as I've been around."

Flash to Haskins' most dominating game of the 2018 season: a 62-39 victory against Michigan and its top-ranked defense. He threw for 396 yards and six touchdowns and received a Heisman invite to New York. The Wolverines rarely pressured Haskins, but on two plays they did. Both resulted in Haskins runs of 9 yards. On one, Haskins told the Big Ten Network that, based on film study, he anticipated a blitz from the wide side by a linebacker and the middle linebacker. But the blitz actually came from the shortside cornerback and linebacker.

Haskins quickly recognized the issue, knew he had no time in the pocket and he took off running.

"He did not make a bad situation worse," Day said. "That's important."

Quarterbacks coach Quincy Avery, who first worked with Haskins in high school, prepped him for the combine and his pro day. They'd watch film together on a 70-inch TV; Haskins would also watch on his iPad. They went over all his plays; they watched other quarterbacks. Haskins worked out at times with Houston Texansquarterback Deshaun Watson.

 

Haskins worked four days a week for six hours with Avery, with four hours devoted to throwing sessions emphasizing footwork drills. Another two hours were spent on lifting and agility work. The film studies came after.

"The quickness of the processing has changed," Avery said, "how quickly he sees things like the front, the linebacker shift and the safety tilt. He puts those things together very quickly."

The next step will be to repeat his success in the NFL. There's no guarantee. Like in his other steps, that success might take time. But Haskins put himself in this spot for one reason.

"He put in massive hours of work," Avery said, "to get to where he wants to be."

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https://www.cleveland.com/osu/2016/06/meet_bryson_spinner_the_qb_coa.html

 

"The Kid" is Dwayne Haskins, a former four-star quarterback of Potomac (Md.) The Bullis School who signed with Ohio State as part of Meyer's 2016 recruiting class. On National Signing Day, Meyer mentioned Haskins' quarterback coach multiple times.

"The quarterback coach, like I told you, we'll have him come in here and meet with us because he's that good," Meyer said. "The fundamentals that Dwayne Haskins possesses right now is as good as I've ever seen in a young quarterback."

That coach is Spinner, a former college quarterback who played at Virginia and Richmond before a brief stint in the NFL. Spinner now runs Perfect Performance, a training business that helps prepare athletes for the next level. Spinner would hate this his business was even mentioned because he doesn't want financial gain. He doesn't.

When you think personal quarterback coach, you probably think of George Whitfield and interesting drills with paint cans and footwork in the sand. Spinner did some crazy drills like that with Haskins, but the training wasn't about that.

Spinner said most of his quarterback drills have been done in the past by other coaches, but his communication to Haskins was more about self-ownership.

That must have translated well because Haskins would meet with Spinner roughly 20 hours a week on his own on top of football practice, weight training and school. That training lasted the past four years.

 

"He'd call me up after a long day and want to throw late at night for a few hours," Spinner said of Haskins. "That's why I can't take the credit. I was there with him, but I don't have ownership in his accomplishments."

Spinner wasn't specific about the details of what his drill work with Haskins looked like, but Haskins didn't become one of the most sought-after quarterbacks in the country by accident. Meyer noticed Haskins' fundamentals on tape and recruited hard with intention of bringing him to one of the most prestigious programs in the country. Fundamentals come from coaching.

"I just love his drill work," Meyer said of Spinner. "We're studying it and he's one of the best I've ever been around. I got to see it first-hand. Sometimes you watch guys do these incredible drills and then you turn on the video and it looks nothing like that, so that means he's a poor teacher. This guy is outstanding."

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On ‎4‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 1:04 PM, ThomasRoane said:

 

Yeah, and not against weak competition like Northwestern.  Or Purdue who got curb stomped by (8 - 5) Auburn 63 - 14.  Do you honestly think he's going to be that evasive vs philthy or the cowpies linemen?  I don't.  But, we'll talk at the end of the season.  I hope I'm wrong about him but I really don't believe I am.

I don't understand your thoughts on being "Evasive", like Brady?  Maybe like Manning ? What QB does he need to be as evasive of?

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8 hours ago, Riggo#44 said:

 

Because of the reports that Snyder and Allen wanted Haskins, and Smith-Gruden did not. If that's accurate (and Lord knows it's entirely possible Snyder and Allen shoehorned this pick), then it gives me pause. When has Snyder ever forced his way and it turned out well?

 

Snyder has been so bad as an owner we are automatically conditioned to react negatively to whenever he is mentioned.

 

Haskins is talented, I've read a lot about him, and seems like he has tremendous potential--but we need to be patient with him. If Snyder goes full Snyder and forces him on the field, it won't turn out well.

 

We have reason to hope Haskins wasn't another Snyder master move, consider the evidence.  First,  no Andy Reid connection has been established.  It's possible Dan reached out to his goto QB guru for input again this time but for the moment I think we should assume that wasn't the case.  Second, and I think this is critical and perhaps definitive, there is no real evidence of Danny boy desperate love in this pick.  The Skins drafted Haskins at the #15 spot in due course.  Contrast this selection with the starry-eyed reach the Giants made for their QB or Danny's RGIII lovers leap.  I think these points argue for the moment that it was likely a consensus front office pick.  That said if Haskins sucks I'll blame Dan.

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9 hours ago, goskins10 said:

 

Ok, so full disclosure I was not and am still not a huge fan of this pick - but not for any of the reasons they state. If I were a Giants fan I would be grasping at any straw to help myself feel better about the complete and utter failure the giants draft was, specially day one. They managed to get lower than they should have value with each pick they made. Jones is easily had later in the draft. If you pass on him then you get a true stud at 6 like Ed Oliver, Devin Bush, or Christian Wilkinson on D or Jonah Williams or Christopher Lindstrom on Off. Instead they take Jones at 6 and then follow that up with another reach in Dexter Lawrence. They did a little better with the Deandre Baker pick but overall that was a really poor 1st rd when you consider they had 3 picks. The rest of their draft was just meh. So yea, I would trying to find anything I could to make myself feel better. 

 

Back to Haskins. The only fair criticism is that he charged for the draft party. I would venture a guess that he is not the only one. And in fairness most players in the current NFL do the same. Last guess and comment on charging, it was more than likely his agents idea. 

 

The body language? Bull****. He expected to go earlier - he was disappointing he went later as it cost him several $Ms of dollars and again this is just a guess, but I bet his agent was filling him full of he will go 3rd or 6th. I watched the same thing everyone else did - he was relieved but clearly wanted to go higher. Do you want someone who is happy when they expect more and don;t get there? His overall response is that he plans to work hard to prove his detractors wrong. It's amazing the double standard many people have - if guys get all excited people say, he is too emotional, needs to calm down he hasn't done anything yet. If they are stoic then it's he has no heart, he is not interested. It turns out these guys are just people like everyone else. Some show more emotion than others. It really is that simple. 

 

Now my concerns with Haskins. My biggest knock on him as ap layer are two things - one bigger than the other. The small sample size of work worries me as people now get to see what he likes to do and take it away. And NFL DCs are the best at doing just that. But in fairness he could also be just fine. And OCs are also good at putting guys in a position to succeed. 

 

My biggest concern with Haskins is he breaks down when he has to move around. He is great while in the pocket. But then again most QBs can pick you apart. But he tends to panic and get very inaccurate. His deep throw is not the best either. Some of this can be coached. Some I am not so sure. I will say that the video @Llevron posted of the film session with Gerry DiNardo ( is awesome and made me start to rethink my position on Haskins. He is a smart guy and seems to understand the NFL like concepts pretty well for a guy with only 1 season experience. But it gets much tougher when you are actually in the NFL. 

 

As always, he is now a Washington Redskin. So I don't care where he was drafted or what other things are going on, I will root for him to be awesome. And in fairness, the more I see and read I am starting to warm up to him. 

I may not agree with everything, but this is damn good and fair assessment.

 

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Dwayne Haskins will benefit from the same source that Patrick Mahomes did, as Alex Smith will be around.  I've heard analysts talking about how Haskins won't benefit from playing behind Case or McCoy.  I agree.  He's going to benefit from learning from Alex Smith and Kevin O'Connell.  It has nothing to do with Case or McCoy. 

 

 

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