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Where is the Outrage over Boeing 737-MAX?

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9 minutes ago, AsburySkinsFan said:

Boeing fixes their problem when they learn about it and.....wait for it......

......

.......

.......

........

........

keep waiting.....

.......

........

those planes don't crash!

those people live

this thread doesn't exist.

And the other thousands (millions?) of hours this same plane model has logged. Did those pilots and airlines just get lucky?

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, Elessar78 said:

And the other thousands (millions?) of hours this same plane model has logged. Did those pilots and airlines just get lucky?

How many occurences have been reported?

Edited by AsburySkinsFan

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Southwest reported zero issues with MCAS in their 737 fleet. Since Lion Air American Airlines has reviewed over 14,000 flights with zero issues related to MCAS. 

 

It's just two carriers but still a good track record. Don't know what the other American carriers know or don't know related to their flights and MCAS. 

 

Do you think they should've grounded the planes after Lion Air? 

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Posted (edited)
51 minutes ago, AsburySkinsFan said:

How many occurences have been reported?

There was an optional warning light put in place for a reason.  Wouldn’t it be logical to surmise that somebody must have an inkling prior to the plane being made available if they felt the need to put a “hey your plane is going to throw you into the ground at 500mph” light in place?

 

of course, said light was optional to the tune of $80k per airframe but is now going to be standard.....

 

all that to say, call it a hunch but I’m guessing LionAir wasn’t the first time this issue was noted

Edited by stoshuaj

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11 minutes ago, stoshuaj said:

There was an optional warning light put in place for a reason.  Wouldn’t it be logical to surmise that somebody must have an inkling prior to the plane being made available if they felt the need to put a “hey your plane is going to throw you into the ground at 500mph” light in place?

 

of course, said light was optional to the tune of $80k per airframe but is now going to be standard.....

 

all that to say, call it a hunch but I’m guessing LionAir wasn’t the first time this issue was noted

And the necessity of said light was downplayed by Boeing so much that the training for the Max series was on an ipad. It is painfully obvious that Boeing knew of the problem and only did half measures to address it even after the first crash. Even after the second they fought to keep them flying all to protect their stock value and sales. 

Boeing thought it was so important that they offered an OPTIONAL warning light for $80,000 rather than just installing a ****ing light.

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1 minute ago, CousinsCowgirl84 said:

The airliners choosing to save 80,000 dollars instead of just paying for a ****ing light.

 

And the extra training or more experienced pilots.

 

Of course since they didn't pay attention to the trim gauge right beside them a dummy light would be a good idea.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, AsburySkinsFan said:

And the necessity of said light was downplayed by Boeing so much that the training for the Max series was on an ipad. It is painfully obvious that Boeing knew of the problem and only did half measures to address it even after the first crash. Even after the second they fought to keep them flying all to protect their stock value and sales. 

Boeing thought it was so important that they offered an OPTIONAL warning light for $80,000 rather than just installing a ****ing light.

Must have been a helluva board meeting:

 

Engineer 1, “um, fellas we may have a problem.  This thing goes bat**** crazy sometimes”

 

suit1, “huh, well that’s no good”

 

engineer2, “yeah but we got all these extra lights cheap when Radio Shack went under”

 

suit1, “I’m listening”

 

engineer2, “we can just wire em in above the fuzzy dice”

 

saleshole1, “and we can make them an 80 grand option to tack on my commission, hell yeah”

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31 minutes ago, CousinsCowgirl84 said:

The airliners choosing to save 80,000 dollars instead of just paying for a ****ing light.

A ****ING AIRLINE MANUFACTURER NOT FIXING THEIR **** THEN SELLING A PATCH JOB AS A ****ING OPTION IS ****ING CRIMINAL.

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It’s so painfully obvious some of you have never had to sit in a room where big decisions are made nor know anything about engineering. 

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18 hours ago, twa said:

 

The pilot while being young was fairly experienced, the co-pilot was not.

fwiu they use like a apprenticeship program w/co-pilots which allows much less experienced ones in the ****pit than the US does.

 

I disagree with you on the pilot’s experience. The article said he had about 8,000 hours, which means he’s been flying for 4 years or so. When 150+ lives are at risk, I don’t like the idea of a 4 year guy tutoring a new guy with on the job training in a brand new plane. Pairing a 45 year old with a 25 year old is one thing, but I think putting two 20 somethings together is one of the many mistakes in this disaster.

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15 hours ago, twa said:

 

a warning light is not a patch

 

No ****.

and they didn't even do that, tell me again how much Boeing cared.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, RansomthePasserby said:

 

I disagree with you on the pilot’s experience. The article said he had about 8,000 hours, which means he’s been flying for 4 years or so. When 150+ lives are at risk, I don’t like the idea of a 4 year guy tutoring a new guy with on the job training in a brand new plane. Pairing a 45 year old with a 25 year old is one thing, but I think putting two 20 somethings together is one of the many mistakes in this disaster.

Isn’t the max a pilot is allowed to fly 1000 hours per year?

Edited by HOF44

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Looks like Boeing shareholders are now holding the company accountable for deceiving about the flaws. Just heard it on the news. 

Strange, how many lawsuits against the pilots at this point?

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2 hours ago, AsburySkinsFan said:

Looks like Boeing shareholders are now holding the company accountable for deceiving about the flaws. Just heard it on the news. 

Strange, how many lawsuits against the pilots at this point?

 

You sue the airlines who employed them, wanna bet how many do that?

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36 minutes ago, twa said:

 

You sue the airlines who employed them, wanna bet how many do that?

Interesting complaint that the shareholders have against Boeing, no?

"Deceived" is a strong word...and yet

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3 minutes ago, AsburySkinsFan said:

Interesting complaint that the shareholders have against Boeing, no?

"Deceived" is a strong word...and yet

 

Lotta strong words gonna be used before this is over.

People hate losing money.

 

Just as the lawyers will try to keep it in US courts, whereas Boeing will prefer the country the airline or crash was located.

 

your point about the pilots is faulty, lawyers go after big money(which is employers and manufacturers....and their insurers :pint:)

 

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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=H2tuKiiznsY

Vox made a video that is simple enough to understand.

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Interesting, if only Boring had done the right thing and fixed their product BEFORE several hundred people died, and if only they didn't try and pass it off a pilot error knowing full well they had problems all while minimizing the risk.

 

 

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On Apr 27th 2019 it became known, that four independent whistleblowers, current and former Boeing employees, had called the FAA hotline for whistleblowers regarding aviation safety concerns on Apr 5th 2019. The concerns reported were wiring damage to the AoA related wiring as result of foreign object damage as well as concerns with the TRIM CUTOUT switches. The FAA believes these reports may open completely new investigative angles into the causes of the two crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.
 

 

https://www.avherald.com/h?article=4c534c4a/0045&opt=0

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On 4/5/2019 at 7:00 PM, tshile said:

It’s so painfully obvious some of you have never had to sit in a room where big decisions are made nor know anything about engineering. 

Apparently, the pilots tried......and apparently the mtg went about as well as the supposed satire.......

 

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/boeing-pilots-grill-officials-on-787-max-safety-171238960.html

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, stoshuaj said:

Apparently, the pilots tried......and apparently the mtg went about as well as the supposed satire.......

 

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/boeing-pilots-grill-officials-on-787-max-safety-171238960.html

 

Quote

An unidentified Boeing official heard on the audio said that the pilots didn’t need to be aware of that information since chances of that same crash happening again was remote

 

Note:  The meeting took place after the first crash, but before the second one.  

Edited by Larry

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