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USAT: School with major chickenpox outbreak (Now Anti-Vaxxer thread)

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4 minutes ago, PleaseBlitz said:

Yea, I think anti-vaxxers make up the extreme wings of both parties, those people willing to believe any dumb bull**** they get told and who live in truly insular bubbles.  The difference is the main wing of the Democrats believe in science and therefore their elected officials reflect that.  Meanwhile the main wing of the Republicans generally distrust being told what is good for them, especially by the government or people with educations and, ironically, believe everything that Trump, the President, tells them, and he's said some very anti-vax things in the past. 

 

Both parties have the choice of courting the anti-vaxx vote. Only one of them is shameless enough to do it and power hungry enough to do whatever it takes to win elections, even if it means endangering public health.

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23 hours ago, No Excuses said:

 

Feel free to explain at any point how the "Dems are weak on Biology" like the "Republicans are weak on environmental science", when only one party, the GOP, has a near perfect track record of supporting quackery over evidence-based science. 

 

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Number of US measles cases surpasses 1,000 this year, CDC says

 

The number of cases of measles in the United States this year has surpassed 1,000, the US Department of Health and Human Services said Wednesday. The agency said there have been 1,001 cases so far this year.

 

That’s 20 more cases than the US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention reported on Monday in its weekly national update. This year, which is barely half over, has the greatest number of cases in a single year in nearly three decades.

 

“The Department of Health and Human Services has been deeply engaged in promoting the safety and effectiveness of vaccines, amid concerning signs that there are pockets of undervaccination around the country,” said US Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in a statement.

 

“The 1,000th case of a preventable disease like measles is a troubling reminder of how important that work is to the public health of the nation,” Azar continued.

 

The number of cases this year is the highest since 1992 when there were 2,237 cases of the highly contagious illness reported in the United States. It’s the highest number of cases in a single year since it was eliminated nationwide in 2000, meaning it was no longer continuously transmitted in the country.

 

Cases have been reported in more than half of US states. New York has been the largest contributor to this year’s unfortunate milestone with nearly 700 cases of measles reported this year in the state.

 

Most of those cases have been in Orthodox Jewish communities In Brooklyn and Queens with low vaccination rates. The New York City Health Department reported that as of June 3 there had been 566 confirmed cases in those areas since September.

 

Clark County in Washington state had the second-largest outbreak in the US this year with more than 70 cases reported.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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Gee, what's the problem with intentionally not vaccinating against highly contagious diseases in New York City?

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I am not aware of any Hasidic prohibition against vaccines.  Is there one?  For such a well-educated, albeit insular, community I have been surprised by this development.

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I've been trying to figure out why demographics which ought to be more intelligent, caring, involved, just "better parents" keep popping up as doing the same thing as moronic conspiracy theorists. 

 

I've got a theory, although granted its based solely on my imagination. 

 

It's because they think they're special. Better. Selfish. Something in that neighborhood. 

 

Just imagine I'm a parent. (OK, imagine I'm a parent, and you don't know me.)  I'm deciding whether to vaccinate myself/kid/somebody. I'm drawing up a list of Pro and Con. 

 

Now, I'm aware that vaccines have some risk. It's minuscule, but it's not zero

 

Well, if I don't vaccinate my kid, then the risk of harm from the vaccine is zero. And as long as everybody else vaccinates, then my kid is still safe, anyway. My kid gets to live in a measles-free country, without the teeny weenie risk from the vaccine. 

 

Now, I confess, my theory may not explain what's happening. I could see parents choosing not to vaccinate, when the CDC is reporting that measles have been eliminated. The vaccine looks like a risk without a reward. 

 

But why would such a parent not go get the kid vaccinated now?

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They don’t think their child will die or have long term issues. These are mostly selfish assholes who think their child recovering from measles or chickenpox is worth it, even if kids with weak immune systems due to genetics or an illness are at grave risk of not being able to survive if exposed. 

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I'm confused, I thought ya'll supported choice?

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Posted (edited)

Notices twa was last poster in antiVax thread:

 

Opens thread:

Edited by Springfield
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20 hours ago, Cooked Crack said:

 

Jessica Biel forever ruined. She's just lost her chance to have relations with me ever.

 

Useless w/o pics.  Then I can assess her anti-vax arguments.  

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Despite the rhetoric about anti-vaccinations proponents being uneducated republicans, the most serious measles outbreaks are somehow occurring in overwhelmingly liberal regions (New York, southern Washington State, and California.  

 

I assume that the explanation for this inexplicable inconsistency is that the ignorant majority Republican regions are just not reporting their cases or are too dumb to diagnose them properly.

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Posted (edited)

I think that the antivax movement crosses political boundaries.  To me it seems mostly personality driven, in that people fear or are untrustworthy of reputable sources.

 

Like how people don’t trust police, or the government crosses political boundaries.

Edited by Springfield

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I think the anti-vax movement started in ultra liberal conclaves where extraordinarily privileged white people could not process and therefore needed to place blame on something external when they faced a legitimate hardship for the first time (their kids having developmental difficulties, which, to be sure, is difficult).  

 

Then ultra right wingers, which is most right wingers, decided that they needed to keep their monopoly on being easily duped by scoundrels.  Something like a mass "hold my beer" movement, but so their kids get a dangerous disease that is normally easily preventable.

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