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USAT: School with major chickenpox outbreak (Now Anti-Vaxxer thread)

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12 hours ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

I am NOT an anti-vaxer.  I also do not pretend to be smart enough to understand all the science presented.  That said, I do wonder how vaccines affect the ability of people to fight off illnesses later.  What is the line between preventing a disease and weakening your bodies ability to fight things off because it hasn't had to before?

 

you could argue it possibly weakens our species evolution, but mankind intervening in the natural laws is part of our charm.

 

a bigger herd is my preference,though it comes with complications .

 

add

 

it and antibiotics and such do bend the evolutionary curve

not just for us but the pathogens themselves

 

https://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002236

 

do you swing for the fence or lean into the pitch?

 

 

Edited by twa
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53 minutes ago, TheGreatBuzz said:

But isn't it a weaker version of a virus injected?  To stick with your analogy, is it like knowing you have to go into a weight lifting competition so you only do 10lb curls?

 

I have read that things like the rampant use of hand sanitizer actually hurts your immune system in the long run.  I laugh because at work, the people that use it the most seem to be sick the most.  

 

Again, I'm not expert.  Just kicking around ideas.

No it's not a weakened virus, it's a dead virus.  The point is the white blood cells, from engaging the dead virus, now recognize it, now how to attack it, and immediately and will attack any live ones that should enter your body. This lessons the possibility of the virus creating a "beachead" and causing other problems.

 

edit--- there are live virus immunizations, but they are rarely used and mostly on researchers in specific fields.   

Edited by HOF44
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Why vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts

 

One of the most contentious areas of health policy over the past two decades has been the safety of vaccination. Vaccines prevent the outbreak of diseases that used to be widespread, like polio, and scientific consensus strongly supports their safety. Yet many Americans refuse or delay the vaccination of their children out of fear that it could lead to autism, even though scientific consensus refutes this claim.

 

Anti-vaccine attitudes have been fueled in large part by growing rates of autism diagnoses as well as a now debunked study in The Lancet that linked autism and the measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine – pushing many parents to see vaccination as a potential explanation for their child’s autism diagnosis.

 

The growing “anti-vax” movement here and abroad has seen parents refuse to give their children mandatory school vaccinations, growing numbers of celebrities questioning vaccine safety, and even pet owners refusing to vaccinate their dogs – forcing the British Veterinary Association to issue a statement in April that dogs cannot develop autism.

Given the consistent message from the scientific community about the safety of vaccines, and evidence of vaccine success as seen through the eradication of diseases, why has the skepticism about vaccines continued?

 

One possibility is that attitudes about medical experts help to explain the endorsement of anti-vax attitudes. Specifically, building on past research, our research team contends that some U.S. adults might support anti-vax policy positions in part because they believe they know more than medical experts about autism and its causes. We wanted to test this theory.

 

We wondered: Could the inability of anti-vaxxers to accurately appraise their own knowledge and skills compared to those of medical experts play a role in shaping their attitudes about vaccines? This inability to accurately appraise one’s own knowledge is called the Dunning-Kruger effect, first identified in social psychology. Dunning-Kruger effects occur when individuals’ lack of knowledge about a particular subject leads them to inaccurately gauge their expertise on that subject. Ignorance of one’s own ignorance can lead people who lack knowledge on a subject think of themselves as more expert than those who are comparatively better informed. We refer to this as “overconfidence.”

 

To test our hypothesis, our research asked more than 1,300 Americans in December 2017 to compare their own perceived levels of knowledge about the causes of autism to those of medical doctors and scientists. After doing that, we asked respondents to answer a series of factual knowledge questions about autism, as well as the extent to which they agree with misinformation about a potential link between childhood vaccines and autism.

 

We found that 34 percent of U.S. adults in our sample feel that they know as much or more than scientists about the causes of autism. Slightly more, or 36 percent, feel the same way about their knowledge relative to that of medical doctors.

 

We also found strong evidence of Dunning-Kruger effects in our sample. Sixty-two percent of those who performed worst on our autism knowledge test believe that they know as much or more than both doctors and scientists about the causes of autism, compared to only 15 percent of those scoring best on the knowledge test. Likewise, 71 percent of those who strongly endorse misinformation about the link between vaccines and autism feel that they know as much or more than medical doctors about the causes of autism, compared to only 28 percent of those who most strongly reject that misinformation.

 

We recently published our findings at the journal Social Science and Medicine.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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2 hours ago, China said:

forcing the British Veterinary Association to issue a statement in April that dogs cannot develop autism.

giphy.gif

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5 cases of ‘whooping cough’ confirmed at schools in Moore County

 

MOORE COUNTY, N.C. – Five cases of pertussis – also known as “whooping cough” – were confirmed at schools in Moore County on Monday.

 

The identified cases are all Moore County School System students attending West End Elementary School, Southern Pines Primary School, and Pinecrest High School.

 

Pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing that may last for weeks. It can live on surfaces such as desks, but it’s nearly always spread through direct contact like coughing and sneezing.

 

The students who were diagnosed are all being treated, according to school and Moore County Health Department officials.

 

The Moore County Health Department urges all residents, especially infants and young children, to be current on their immunizations.

 

 

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On 2/5/2019 at 10:23 AM, China said:

5 cases of ‘whooping cough’ confirmed at schools in Moore County

 

MOORE COUNTY, N.C. – Five cases of pertussis – also known as “whooping cough” – were confirmed at schools in Moore County on Monday.

 

The identified cases are all Moore County School System students attending West End Elementary School, Southern Pines Primary School, and Pinecrest High School.

 

Pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing that may last for weeks. It can live on surfaces such as desks, but it’s nearly always spread through direct contact like coughing and sneezing.

 

The students who were diagnosed are all being treated, according to school and Moore County Health Department officials.

 

The Moore County Health Department urges all residents, especially infants and young children, to be current on their immunizations.

 

 

O.m.g. I got whooping cough 5 years ago.

Worst experience of my entire life and I'm not exaggerating. 

Had it for 5 months and around 8 to 12 times a day the coughing would knock the wind out of me.

I'd wake dead bolt upright in the middle of the night not being able to breath and in literal full panic mode.

The doctors all said there was nothing anybody could do and I just had to wait it out.

I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. 

 

Ps. I'm not anti vax I have all my shots but whooping cough i guess doesn't last very long or isn't terribly effective.

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On 2/6/2019 at 6:20 PM, LD0506 said:

 

 

****, I had no idea this show was still a thing! I rremember watching it as a youngin 

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Good for him:

 

Teen defies parents, gets first vaccinations during measles outbreaks in US

 

An 18-year-old from Norfolk, Ohio, recently made the decision to receive his first-ever vaccines for a number of diseases despite his parents’ beliefs.

 

Ethan Lindenberger discussed his decision in an interview with NPR News that was released on Saturday.

 

In the interview, Lindenberger said he had gone without vaccines for diseases like the measles, rubella, mumps and hepatitis for his entire life due to his mother’s anti-vaccine beliefs.

 

He told the publication that his mother, Jill Wheeler, was influenced by online misinformation, including a debunked study that claims certain vaccines could lead to autism and a theory that claims vaccines were linked to brain damage. 

 

Throughout his childhood, Lindenberger said his mother would tell him about the negative side effects of vaccines and how they were bad. He also said he thought it was normal for children not to receive vaccines.

 

But after he realized his other friends and classmates had all been vaccinated, Lindenberger said that’s when he began to do his own research into the matter. 

 

"When I started looking into it myself, it became very apparent that there was a lot more evidence in defense of vaccinations, in their favor," Lindenberger said.

 

Lindenberger said he later approached his mother with research that debunked some of her claims, including a report from the CDC that explained how vaccines did not cause autism. 

 

"Her response was simply 'that's what they want you to think,'" Lindenberger said. "I was just blown away that you know, the largest health organization in the entire world would be written off with a kind of conspiracy theory-like statement like that."

 

Click on the link for the full article

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Facebook under pressure to halt rise of anti-vaccination groups

 

Facebook is under pressure to stem the rise of anti-vaccination groups spreading false information about the dangers of life-saving vaccines while peddling unfounded alternative treatments such as high doses of vitamin C.


So-called “anti-vaxxers” are operating on Facebook in closed groups, where members have to be approved in advance. By barring access to others, they are able to serve undiluted misinformation without challenge.

 

The groups are large and sophisticated. Stop Mandatory Vaccination has more than 150,000 approved members. Vitamin C Against Vaccine Damage claims that large doses of the vitamin can “heal” people from vaccine damage, even though vaccines are safe.

 

Health experts are calling on Facebook to do more to counter these echo chambers. Dr Wendy Sue Swanson, spokeswoman of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said: “Facebook should prioritise dealing with the threat to human health when falsehoods and misinformation are shared. This isn’t just self-harm, it’s community harm.”

 

Swanson recently met with Facebook strategists and raised her concerns. “Parents deserve the truth. If they are being served up something that is not true it will likely increase their levels of anxiety and fear and potentially change their uptake of vaccines, which is dangerous,” she said.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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