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Death toll in Northern California's huge Carr Fire rises to six

 

Another person died in Northern California's massive Carr Fire, bringing its death toll to six, authorities said Sunday.

 

Shasta County Sheriff Tom Bosenko told reporters that the person did not abide by an evacuation notice.

 

A firefighter, a bulldozer operator and three people preparing to evacuate a home have also been killed in the blaze, which exploded over the weekend, growing from about 48,000 acres on Friday night to double that on Sunday, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire.

 

Ed Bledsoe ran to the store on Thursday to grab supplies. Within an hour, his house, his wife, Melody, 70, and two of their great-grandchildren, James, 5, and Emily, 4, were gone.

 

.....

 

The blaze was 20 percent contained and had charred more than 90,000 acres as of Monday morning, Cal Fire said.

 

As for how to describe the fire, "'extreme' is not even the right adjective to use anymore," Chris Anthony, a division chief with Cal Fire, said Sunday.

 

"It is just an understatement, because the fire is so explosive now in California," Anthony said.

 

The fire has destroyed 874 homes or other structures and threatens 5,000 more near the city of Redding, the seat of Shasta County and an urban center of about 91,000 people. Around 40,000 residents have evacuated their homes.

 

Click on the link for the full article and video

Edited by China

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Stopped in Redding last July for lunch on the way north to Mt Shasta for a wedding. It was 115 degrees with 0.0000% humidity. 90% of California is a damn tinder box. 

 

 

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Meanwhile 4 of the 8 most destructive fires in California history have occurred in the last 12 months. 

Edited by The Evil Genius

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7 minutes ago, The Evil Genius said:

Meanwhile 4 of the 8 most destructive fires in California history have occurred in the last 12 months. 

 

I think a lot of it also has to do with the overpopulation of the state.  There is a lot more built up that is subsequently destroyed, in other words.  4 million people in LA alone, that many people in a desert is probably not good and is likely more of a factor in the wildfire problem than climate change

 

That said do we have some evidence that fire season is influenced by climate change, but its far from conclusive.  Scientific American said this LY https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/heres-what-we-know-about-wildfires-and-climate-change/

 

In the meantime I think with respect to the victims we ought not to politicize this, especially without a solid footing of evidence.  Thats probably just going to end up marginalizing the victims who need help from everyone right now, not just climate change crusaders.

 

 

 

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Have they changed their building codes to address this well known and predictable danger?  If people want to live amidst the trees in a dry climate it seems that there must be something that can be done to reduce the risk in situations like these.  They probably have already done something, I just don't know what it is.  Seems like some practical education on staying prepared so that in a situation where an evacuation is ordered, people are able to get out more quickly. 

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I live a few hours away from Redding, in Sacramento, and the skies here have been covered in smoke for awhile.   I hope the collective efforts of fire departments are able to get this under control soon. 

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12 minutes ago, Destino said:

Have they changed their building codes to address this well known and predictable danger?  If people want to live amidst the trees in a dry climate it seems that there must be something that can be done to reduce the risk in situations like these.  They probably have already done something, I just don't know what it is.  Seems like some practical education on staying prepared so that in a situation where an evacuation is ordered, people are able to get out more quickly. 

 

I think that buiding code requires sprinkler systems in all new houses over a certain square footage.  I also know there are strict codes about cutting down wild grasses around properties, which makes no sense because from what ive seen they dont remove it, they just cut it down.  Which makes the problem worse

 

But im not really sure what can be done to prevent fires in a tinder box from a code perspective

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1 minute ago, zoony said:

 

 

 

But im not really sure what can be done to prevent fires in a tinder box from a code perspective

 

there are many ways to fireproof homes ect

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It would help if people understood that Sonoma and Napa counties aren't high desert or even remotely similar to Southern California. Neither is Shasta County (where Redding is located). 

 

There isn't a once size fits all solution and the reasons for the fires are myriad. One reoccurring problem though is that the State has almost completely been locked in a heat wave for a few years. This is coming on the heels of a half decade of severe drought. It's not rocket science.

Edited by The Evil Genius
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Redding. Beautiful part of the state. My mother in law lives there so we watched this beast anxiously. Last Thursday night through Friday being the most anxious. ****er was moving and going wherever it wanted. She lives across I5 and the Sacramento River about 4 or so miles from the Eastern perimeter of the fire but that didn't mean a lot those couple of days. She and her husband doing well even with all the smoke in the area. Nasty fire that's taken its share. :( 

 

Few videos of what it was like then and after. Frightening and amazing. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And sad. 

 

 

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Cat, Chicken Survive Carr Fire Together

 

SHASTA COUNTY — Crews from Grass Valley helping fight the Carr Fire in Shasta County came upon an unlikely pair of survivors in one neighborhood — a cat and a chicken.

 

Both animals were found at the doorway of a home, huddled together “for safety and support,” firefighters said. The cat and chicken both had burn injuries.

 

cat-and-chicken.jpg?quality=85&strip=all

 

Firefighters gave them water and coaxed them into a crate to take them to a veterinarian. They rode in the same crate, of course.

 

cat-and-chicken-2.jpg?quality=85&strip=a

 

Click on the link for the full article

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1 hour ago, Dr. Do Itch Big said:

My friend is from Redding and his family had sold their home three weeks ago. He says the whole neighborhood has been burned down. 

 

At least he sold his home in time. Small victories?

 

On a serious note, it's unsurprising that area is seeing fires, with years of drought and an insane heat index. I'm not far from Riverside county, which is kind of the same way.

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That chicken has earned a reprieve right?  It survived a fire with his homie the cat, it just seems too cruel to toss him in an oven or on a grill after that.  

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11 minutes ago, Destino said:

That chicken has earned a reprieve right?  It survived a fire with his homie the cat, it just seems too cruel to toss him in an oven or on a grill after that.  

 

Just think about how good he smelled though. Getting slowly smoked over a period of hours, or even days...

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On 7/31/2018 at 1:48 PM, Destino said:

Have they changed their building codes to address this well known and predictable danger?  If people want to live amidst the trees in a dry climate it seems that there must be something that can be done to reduce the risk in situations like these.  They probably have already done something, I just don't know what it is.  Seems like some practical education on staying prepared so that in a situation where an evacuation is ordered, people are able to get out more quickly. 

 

By codes we may need to re-evaluate where we let people put homes.

 

We may not be helping the forest fires by putting them out and letting the fuel build up, but there have always been forest fires.  The difference is there's millions of people in the area now and they are constantly in the way of them

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A friend of mine lost his home today. Successful movie director, real nice house in real nice area -- hardly out in the boonies. Crazy what's going on here in Cali -- fire season has become a way of life. 

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