Jump to content
Washington Football Team Logo
Extremeskins

What's your favorite/least favorite Led Zeppelin album?


Spaceman Spiff

What's your   

32 members have voted

  1. 1. What's your FAVORITE Led Zeppelin album?

    • I
      3
    • II
      6
    • III
      4
    • IV
      2
    • Houses of the Holy
      5
    • Physical Graffiti
      7
    • Presence
      0
    • In Through the Out Door
      2
    • Coda
      0
    • Live: The Song Remains the Same
      2
    • Live: BBC Sessions
      1
    • Live: How the West Was Won
      0
  2. 2. What's your LEAST FAVORITE Led Zeppelin album?

    • I
      1
    • II
      0
    • III
      1
    • IV
      0
    • Houses of The Holy
      1
    • Physical Graffiti
      0
    • Presence
      5
    • In Through the Out Door
      7
    • Coda
      15
    • Live: The Song Remains the Same
      1
    • Live: BBC Sessions
      1
    • Live: How the West Was Won
      0


Recommended Posts

I'll also argue that JPJ is one of the most underrated musicians of all time.  In a band where you have arguably the greatest drummer, greatest singer and a top 10 guitarist, he never seems to get his due.  Someone had to take a backseat to the rest of the three and not let his ego get in the way all the while adding essential pieces to their music at every given turn and he did it better than anyone else could have.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Spaceman Spiff said:

I'll also argue that JPJ is one of the most underrated musicians of all time.  In a band where you have arguably the greatest drummer, greatest singer and a top 10 guitarist, he never seems to get his due.  Someone had to take a backseat to the rest of the three and not let his ego get in the way all the while adding essential pieces to their music at every given turn and he did it better than anyone else could have.

 

Greatest guitarist.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah JPJ could play and write anything. He really was versatile and doesn't get credit for that. His career after Zeppelin may not have been as popular as Page or Plant, but probably more prolific and better in quality. He's produced some great stuff and written some great stuff that gets overlooked.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hendrix used to make Jimmy-Page-on-heroin level mistakes a little too often for me.  SRV really sharpened that **** up.  Granted, Hendrix was always experimenting and pushing the limits.  When he was on, oh boy it's masterful.  No doubt.  His studio recordings are sharp, too.  He's the man.

 

Young Jimmy Page is simply wicked.  Like the Ghost of Christmas Future standing there, ripping up the most evil **** he can think of.  I prefer him during their early years to any guitarist, overall.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I swear there was a version of Coda I had years ago....a really long time ago.  It had this great live Jimmy Page solo from a show where it was just him playing the guitar, no one else in the band played.  I can't find it anywhere now, I have no idea what it's called.  Pretty sure there was a video of it on the double disc dvd they came out with about 15 years ago but that doesn't help.  Maybe it was in one of their box sets, I'm not exactly sure.

 

Any help?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Springfield said:

So I started listening to Zep at the gym this week, because of this thread.

 

1 and 2 are exemplary.  3 is rather weak.  I'll be onto 4 tomorrow.

 

I'm the only mofo who voted for 3 as my least favorite.  Immigrant Song is....revolutionary for rock drumming.  It's Bonzo and the gang triumphantly bringing in another powerhouse album.  Then...well...it...chills out.  Hmph.  Gallows Pole is a fave of mine, but it's probably the lone song that I wish Bonzo drummed differently.  I think it would've been a classic hulk smasher of a song if he didn't play the backbeat on it.  That is, switch the snare and bass drum sounds.  I think he did it to show that talent off, but in the end, he would've laid some bluesy **** down if he just played it straightforward.  I digress.  I put ITTOD above Presence and III.  Sorry.  It's close, it's close.  ITTOD is my jams.

 

 

17 minutes ago, Spaceman Spiff said:

I swear there was a version of Coda I had years ago....a really long time ago.  It had this great live Jimmy Page solo from a show where it was just him playing the guitar, no one else in the band played.  I can't find it anywhere now, I have no idea what it's called.  Pretty sure there was a video of it on the double disc dvd they came out with about 15 years ago but that doesn't help.  Maybe it was in one of their box sets, I'm not exactly sure.

 

Any help?

 

Maybe a version of "Black Mountain Side"?

 

8 minutes ago, Spaceman Spiff said:

 

Also, Walter's Walk.  I don't know **** about the drums but I love how the way his sound on that song.

 

Here's where it hurts...

 

Coda was a collection of songs that were cut from previous albums.  It was all set up for them to make another double album, like Physical Graffiti, but they weren't able to make fresh songs for it.  Imagine Physical Graffiti II.

 

So give Coda a break.  It's not meant to be a concerted effort, it's not fair to be in the discussion.  The live albums are impossible for me to compare to the studio albums, as well.  That's a whole 'nother ball game.  There is so much to be said about their 8 freshly-recorded* studio albums, that I think that's where it gets interesting. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

God, I'm listening to Led Zeppelin III, and question picking it last place.  Bron-Y-Aur Stomp means a lot to me.  It's a song about Plant's dog.  Always think of my past dogs when I hear it.  The live version on the Zep DVD is unbelievable.

 

Out on the Tiles is my jam.  ****.

 

Celebration Day has a friggin amazing groove to it, but the choruses kind of ruin it for me.

 

Immigrant, beast mode.  I'm not a big fan of Tangerine.  One of my least-liked Zep songs.

 

Since I've Been Loving You...I dunno, doesn't resonate too well with me.

 

Think I'd prolly switch to Presence.  I'm not a big Houses of the Holy fan, either.  Wow, it's at second place.

 

Edit:  Then I'm reminded of this song being on Presence.  One of my favorites:

 

 

Houses of the Holy has real problems when it comes to my daily different-responses to least-favorite Zep album.  How do you all pick HotH for favorite?  Man.  Over EVERYTHING else?

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, d0ublestr0ker0ll said:

Houses of the Holy has real problems when it comes to my daily different-responses to least-favorite Zep album.  How do you all pick HotH for favorite?  Man.  Over EVERYTHING else?

 

I made a post defending that choice a few days ago. Apparently at least a few others are with me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jimmy Page is a great guitarist and band leader, but to me, there is no question that guys like Clapton and Hendrix were greater musicians.  Ginger Baker was a more skilled drummer than Bonham too.  I think him being such a ****head has negatively influenced the enjoyment of his music and his legacy, but he is absolutely incredible.  But I also think his contributions are far less known so I can see the validity in the argument that Bonham was the most influential drummer from that time.

 

And I'm sure if I thought about it, I could think of more accomplished and skilled vocalists from that time than Robert Plant too, though there wouldn't be many.  Probably have to go to Motown to find them.

 

JPJ was definitely an awesome bassist and keyboard player.  He's responsible for a lot of my favorite components of Zeppelin songs.  The keyboards and bass on Down By the Seaside are incredible, for example.  They make the song.

 

I think what made Zeppelin so special was the confluence of four truly great musicians in one band that had such compatible personalities and creative ambition and vision.  Page caught lightning in a bottle when he found Bonham and Plant.  Their chemistry was Beatles-esque.  Only, in some ways, they were able to explore so much deeper within the genre because of the groundwork laid down by their predecessor bands like Cream and the Beatles and Stones, and also because Bonham was such a superior percussionist to anything the Beatles had ever had.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, d0ublestr0ker0ll said:

God, I'm listening to Led Zeppelin III, and question picking it last place.  Bron-Y-Aur Stomp means a lot to me.  It's a song about Plant's dog.  Always think of my past dogs when I hear it.  The live version on the Zep DVD is unbelievable.

 

Houses of the Holy has real problems when it comes to my daily different-responses to least-favorite Zep album.  How do you all pick HotH for favorite?  Man.  Over EVERYTHING else?

 

Much to your earlier point about III "chillin out" after Immigrant Song I feel HotH is similar in that regard. I know a lot of people who don't like the folk influence in Zep songs. I personally love it. Also I don't hear the majority of the tracks from those two albums on the radio constantly. That definitely helps. Plus one can't really go wrong with masterpieces like No Quarter and Since I've Been Loving You. 

 

21 minutes ago, stevemcqueen1 said:

 

JPJ was definitely an awesome bassist and keyboard player.  He's responsible for a lot of my favorite components of Zeppelin songs.  The keyboards and bass on Down By the Seaside are incredible, for example.  They make the song.

 

 

JPJ is probably my favorite member. The guy is just awesome. Been playing Zep songs on guitar, bass, and drums since I was about ten. While I admire Page and Bonham JPJ is just on another level IMO.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, stevemcqueen1 said:

Jimmy Page is a great guitarist and band leader, but to me, there is no question that guys like Clapton and Hendrix were greater musicians.  Ginger Baker was a more skilled drummer than Bonham too.  

 

Since there is no way to prove or quantify who "the greatest guitar player" or drummer or whomever, there will never be "no question" that this guy or that guy is better.  I'm a guitar player ( a pretty good one ) and **IMO** Clapton is great, no doubt, very inspiring, but his stuff is pretty simple to play. Not a lot of variety, and that's not a slap at him, truth is most guitarists do a LOT of the same stuff. EVH comes to mind.  Jimmy Page often gets knocked for being "sloppy" and I don't get that. Jimi was "sloppy" as well, but I don't think that's a bad thing, I think its real.  I hate what music has become on many levels. ProTools has made so many albums sound so "perfect" because they literally copy and paste selections and use them over and over.... I like the realness.  Also, Page played so many different styles. Rock, Pop, Blues, Country, borderline Metal.  Great all around player.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, d0ublestr0ker0ll said:

Ha!  Is this it Spaceman?

 

 

Sorry for quoting vid...can't seem to edit this properly on my phone.

White Summer is actually a Yardbirds tune Page brought over with him. That, and a cooler instrumental "Glimpses" are on the Little Games LP. Dazed and Confused also started out as a Yardbirds tune, but never made it onto a studio album. It was on Live at Anderson Theatre, but Page's lawyers had that album removed from circulation.

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, codeorama said:

 

ProTools has made so many albums sound so "perfect" because they literally copy and paste selections and use them over and over.... I like the realness. 

 

I get that 100%. Certainly track comping in Pro Tools can be overdone. I know plenty of people who consider it "cheating". Though when people act like it wasn't an issue before PT came along I just roll my eyes. I do agree with you on liking the "realness" aspect of recording. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, clietas said:

 

I get that 100%. Certainly track comping in Pro Tools can be overdone. I know plenty of people who consider it "cheating". Though when people act like it wasn't an issue before PT came along I just roll my eyes. I do agree with you on liking the "realness" aspect of recording. 

 

I record a lot and I use comping for demos, just to lay out a song, but when I record for real, I play all the parts and track doubles.  I really like it when there is some variance in playing. Old Van Halen was awesome because of this. Lots of mistakes can be heard. Today, you have crap that sounds like a computer made it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...