Riggo#44

All Things Star Wars Thread -- Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker

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1 hour ago, Momma There Goes That Man said:

 

Our only hope rests in a farm boy whose first reaction to handling a light saber is to point it at his face and stare into the hilt. 

 

 

 

But fortunately we have an F-16 sitting around which he's never seen before, but we're going to hand him the keys and send him into combat, anyway. 

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33 minutes ago, Larry said:

 

But fortunately we have an F-16 sitting around which he's never seen before, but we're going to hand him the keys and send him into combat, anyway. 

 

An lo-and-****ing-behold...he hits the target none of the other thoroughly trained and seasoned pilots could come close to.

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46 minutes ago, Riggo#44 said:

 

An lo-and-****ing-behold...he hits the target none of the other thoroughly trained and seasoned pilots could come close to.

 

Once read a letter to the editor on the science fiction magazine, attacking Star Wars for being anti-science. The writer argued that the whole theme was about ignoring facts and science, and just wishing for things to happen. 

 

He argued that the movie was fantasy, not science fiction. Complete with wizards and sword fights. 

 

I remember the line "Trust your feelings, Luke. Switch off that multi-billion-dollar targeting computer. Eyeball it in."

 

And then, a few months later, they published a rebuttal letter. 

 

The author stated that, for qualifications, he was an animator on the film. He explained, for people who wondered what an animator is doing on a live action films, that they worked on special effects. For example, he pointed out that when the Jawa shot R2 with a fire extinguisher, an animator drew lightening around all the seams on him. 

 

And he asserted that the movie wasn't about anti-science so much as it was about the triumph of the human spirit, and of Good versus Evil. 

 

And he concluded with "And 'The Force' didn't make that proton torpedo go in that exhaust port, I did."

 

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10 minutes ago, Larry said:

Once read a letter to the editor on the science fiction magazine, attacking Star Wars for being anti-science. The writer argued that the whole theme was about ignoring facts and science, and just wishing for things to happen. 

 

So the joyless trolls were always there, they just have a wider voice now.

 

12 minutes ago, Larry said:

Trust your feelings, Luke. Switch off that multi-billion-dollar targeting computer. Eyeball it in."

 

Ok, that's funny right there.

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16 minutes ago, Larry said:

 

Once read a letter to the editor on the science fiction magazine, attacking Star Wars for being anti-science. The writer argued that the whole theme was about ignoring facts and science, and just wishing for things to happen. 

 

He argued that the movie was fantasy, not science fiction. Complete with wizards and sword fights. 

 

I remember the line "Trust your feelings, Luke. Switch off that multi-billion-dollar targeting computer. Eyeball it in."

 

And then, a few months later, they published a rebuttal letter. 

 

The author stated that, for qualifications, he was an animator on the film. He explained, for people who wondered what an animator is doing on a live action films, that they worked on special effects. For example, he pointed out that when the Jawa shot R2 with a fire extinguisher, an animator drew lightening around all the seams on him. 

 

And he asserted that the movie wasn't about anti-science so much as it was about the triumph of the human spirit, and of Good versus Evil. 

 

And he concluded with "And 'The Force' didn't make that proton torpedo go in that exhaust port, I did."

 

My rebuttal to both of them is they have too much time on their hands. 

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Posted (edited)

Well, for all we know "the force" could be some incredibly advanced nanotechnology (midichlorians) that used fundamental forces of physics to influence the outside universe and was introduced into certain people so far back that nobody currently (currently in that fictional universe) understands what they truly are.

 

You can retcon science into many things if you want. Lighsabers were originally designed as "laser swords" but now the canon is that it's actually plasma. Which is certainly possible to control/contain. Despite the fact that if you switched on the lightsaber, the air around you would probably become so superheated that you'd burst into flames instantly. 

Edited by mistertim

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Saw a line on a TV show lately. One character said he was into science fiction. Mostly Star Trek. 

 

Other character said she was into science fiction, too. Her favorite was the show with the talking horse. 

 

First character says a talking horse isn't science fiction, it's fantasy. 

 

She replies that a genetic mutation that causes a horse to develop a larynx is science fiction. Flying faster than light?  That's fantasy. 

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4 hours ago, Larry said:

 

Once read a letter to the editor on the science fiction magazine, attacking Star Wars for being anti-science. The writer argued that the whole theme was about ignoring facts and science, and just wishing for things to happen. 

 

He argued that the movie was fantasy, not science fiction. Complete with wizards and sword fights. 

 

I remember the line "Trust your feelings, Luke. Switch off that multi-billion-dollar targeting computer. Eyeball it in."

 

And then, a few months later, they published a rebuttal letter. 

 

The author stated that, for qualifications, he was an animator on the film. He explained, for people who wondered what an animator is doing on a live action films, that they worked on special effects. For example, he pointed out that when the Jawa shot R2 with a fire extinguisher, an animator drew lightening around all the seams on him. 

 

And he asserted that the movie wasn't about anti-science so much as it was about the triumph of the human spirit, and of Good versus Evil. 

 

And he concluded with "And 'The Force' didn't make that proton torpedo go in that exhaust port, I did."

 

I mean...isn't it pretty widely accepted that Star Wars is not technically science fiction?  People tend to use other terms like space opera and fantasy.

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27 minutes ago, dfitzo53 said:

I mean...isn't it pretty widely accepted that Star Wars is not technically science fiction?  People tend to use other terms like space opera and fantasy.

 

I just call it a movie.

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6 hours ago, dfitzo53 said:

I mean...isn't it pretty widely accepted that Star Wars is not technically science fiction?  People tend to use other terms like space opera and fantasy.

 

I'm pretty sure it's ok to call it either one.  You could also fit it into the "action" movie genre.

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