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AJA: Former Egyptian President Morsi sentenced to death


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http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/5/16/former-egyptian-president-morsi-sentenced-to-death.html?utm_content=nobylines&utm_campaign=ajam&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow

Former Egyptian President Morsi sentenced to death

 

An Egyptian court sentenced ousted President Mohamed Morsi and over 100 others to death Saturday over a mass prison break during the 2011 uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak and later brought Islamists to power for the first time in Egypt.

 

As is customary in passing capital punishment, Judge Shaaban el-Shami referred his death sentence on Morsi and others to the nation's top Muslim theologian, or mufti, for his non-binding opinion. El-Shami set June 2 for the next hearing.

 

Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected leader, was ousted by the military in July 2013 following days of mass street protests by Egyptians demanding that he be removed. Morsi's successor, Abdel Fattah El Sisi, was the military chief at the time and led the ouster. Sisi ran for president last year and won the vote in a landslide.

 

An additional 105 defendants were also sentenced to death. Most of them were tried and convicted in absentia. They include some 70 Palestinians. Those tried in absentia in Egypt receive automatic retrials once detained.

 

Supporters of Morsi and his now-outlawed Muslim Brotherhood chanted "down, down with military rule" as el-Shami announced the verdict in the courtroom, a converted lecture hall in the national police academy in an eastern Cairo suburb.

 

Prosecutors have alleged in the case that armed members of the Palestinian Hamas group entered Egypt during the 18-day uprising through illegal tunnels running under Gaza's border with Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. Taking advantage of the uprising's turmoil, they fought their way into several prisons, releasing Morsi, more than 30 other Brotherhood leaders and some 20,000 inmates, prosecutors say. Several prison guards were killed and parts of the stormed prisons were damaged.

 

Those sentenced to death with Morsi on Saturday were the Brotherhood's spiritual leader, Mohammed Badie, as well as one of the Arab world's best known Islamic scholars, the Qatar-based Youssef al-Qaradawi.

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I think that it was a good idea to sack Morsi, he was quickly becoming a dictator.  Mubarek WAS a dictator, and for a much longer time.   I think that executing Morsi will just turn him into a symbol and a martyr... and now people will be canonizing the POS for years and years to come.    

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its hard to square that with the 3-year sentence given to Mubarek this year..... 

 

 

Death sentences often get imposed, then commuted, in Muslim countries.   This may be more political theater.  

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Death sentences often get imposed, then commuted, in Muslim countries.   This may be more political theater.  

Egypt has this operating proceedure but I don't think that translates to muslime countries in general. But bottom-line it is unlikely Morsi will ever be executed.

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Death sentences often get imposed, then commuted, in Muslim countries. This may be more political theater.

Yeah I was wondering about that too, although I'm more worried about all the random activists and folks sentenced to death with morsi. Sisi has shown a willingness to kill tons of people before, so I'm more worried about those who don't have the publicity of someone like morsi.

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I think that it was a good idea to sack Morsi, he was quickly becoming a dictator.  Mubarek WAS a dictator, and for a much longer time.   I think that executing Morsi will just turn him into a symbol and a martyr... and now people will be canonizing the POS for years and years to come.    

Uh what, so you think you should replace someone who might have become a dictator (although never really had that power and most of the things that are cited as him becoming a dictator is his removal of parts of the judiciary which from these clown show trials is a necessary step) for a military government that has killed thousands jailed tens of thousands more and sentences thousands more to death based on no/little evidence and show trials? Sorry but Morsi is leagues better than the current alternative.

In reality Morsi had no chance (either would any President) as the military still extensively controlled the economy and every institution including the judiciary. Now I think he and the bortherhood were dumb to focus on social issues over the economy  and rooting out corruption in the army.(and I think they were monumentally dumb to take the armys deal basically to get into power). Honestly this show why during a revolution you need to take out the heads of the military especially one as powerful and in control of the country as the Egyptian military was otherwise the counter revolution will be quick and vicious like it has been. 

My only hope for Egypt is that the people have learned the lessons that this fiasco has shown and will rise back up against the army which will be tough since most of the activists who led the January 25th revolution are sitting in jail. 

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Yah, poor Morsi. Guess Egypt will have to remain in the 21st century as a place where the educated can feel welcome.

Too bad, they were so close to the violent oppression of women and the tyranny of sharia law. Let's continue to hope that happens

Egypt is a perfect example of why democracy doesn't work on idiots. Texas is another good example

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Yah, poor Morsi. Guess Egypt will have to remain in the 21st century as a place where the educated can feel welcome.

Too bad, they were so close to the violent oppression of women and the tyranny of sharia law. Let's continue to hope that happens

Egypt is a perfect example of why democracy doesn't work on idiots. Texas is another good example

Morsi wasn't a great or even good leader but to cheerlead a coup which overthre the first democratically elected leader and which also killed thousands, imprisoned thousands more, and sentenced yet more thousands to death while stifling freedom of speech, assembly, and dissent is pretty disgusting. 

 

No Egypt is a perfect example of why you need to eliminate the leadership of the old regime especially one with as deep a state as the Egyptian military controlled. There was never a chance of democacry as long as the military kept hold of the state (and United States and Saudi  money definitely helped them hold that control). 

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Morsi wasn't a great or even good leader but to cheerlead a coup which overthre the first democratically elected leader and which also killed thousands, imprisoned thousands more, and sentenced yet more thousands to death while stifling freedom of speech, assembly, and dissent is pretty disgusting. 

 

No Egypt is a perfect example of why you need to eliminate the leadership of the old regime especially one with as deep a state as the Egyptian military controlled. There was never a chance of democacry as long as the military kept hold of the state (and United States and Saudi  money definitely helped them hold that control).

You'd call that a democratically elected leader? the Muslim brotherhood and outside jihadist/fundamentalist groups took advantage of a chaotic situation

The Egyptian people spoke clearly after that. There is a startling amount of information you are not glossing over, but ignoring completely

Egypt is a better country without Morsi and the brotherhood. Unless of course you believe that religion should rule. Then I can see your argument clearly

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You'd call that a democratically elected leader? the Muslim brotherhood and outside jihadist/fundamentalist groups took advantage of a chaotic situation

Are you joking? Yes Morsi won the election and was voted in by the people of Egypt. He wouldn't be my first choice but he was in fact elected. 

 

 The Egyptian people spoke clearly after that. There is a startling amount of information you are not glossing over, but ignoring completely

They spoke through the ballot box, the fact that you seem to want to just throw away elections so an unelected military junta who has shown they are willing to slaughter peaceful protesters, torture, others and suppress the rights of everyone is scary. Lets not pretend that there was anything but a military coup that overthrew Morsi because frankly its just not even close to reality.

 

Yes there were massive protests of the Morsi government but they weren't as representative as the actual electoral process. There were also massive Islamist protests and massive Labor and 3rd Intifadah protests but they didn't get as much coverage because they didn't advance the militaries coup agenda. I think the protests against Morsi were justified and a good thing in a democracy but the coup was a disgusting overthrow of democracy and a return to the dictatorial ways of the Egyptian military (who has shown they are willing to kill protesters and jail anyone else who protests).

 

 

Egypt is a better country without Morsi and the brotherhood. Unless of course you believe that religion should rule. Then I can see your argument clearly

Yes jailing anyone who disagrees with the military junta, taking away all semblences of fair trials, killing thousands of peaceful protestors while jailing thousands more, thats much better then a democratically elected leader and elections. I really hope you are trolling because the fact that anyone at all can support Al-Sisi or what has happened during and since the coup is just baffling.

Egypt is without a doubt much worse than it was during Morsi's 1 year in power.  

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there is a difference between protests against an unpopular leader, and protests against a leader that is attempting to remove obstacles to him consolidating power and authority.  

 

it is an incredibly simplistic view of democracy to point to an election, and say that "poof" it means democracy.   Above all else, Democracy is the building and strengthening of institutions that protect the individuals within a country from the abuse of authority.  

 

Dictatorships LOVE elections.  

 

the choice between a military coup (the only institution in the country with real authority) and letting an individual subsume the country's institutions to his will isn't a good choice.   Not only are coups like epilepsy <<<every time there is a coup, the credibility and strength of all the other institutions is weakened, and makes the liklihood of another coup the next time the country toys with civilian rule>>> but the military was the pillar of Mubarak's power.   

 

sometimes your choice is between gangrene and amputation, and you are not going to like either outcome, but one bad outcome is better than the other bad outcome.     ---      Morsi was looking like the worse outcome.

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there is a difference between protests against an unpopular leader, and protests against a leader that is attempting to remove obstacles to him consolidating power and authority.  

 

it is an incredibly simplistic view of democracy to point to an election, and say that "poof" it means democracy.   Above all else, Democracy is the building and strengthening of institutions that protect the individuals within a country from the abuse of authority.  

What obstacles specifically did he remove and why were they important?

I agree democracy is the strengthening of instiutions but an institution like the judiciary in Egypt (or the military junta) needs to be removed and replaced rather than strengthened. Morsi would have already gone up for re-election (and likely lost) so I don't see how overthrowing a democratically elected leader and government through a military coup (and the subsequent slaughters and removal of rights wholesale that occurred) is a way to strengthen anything democratic.

Dictatorships LOVE elections.  

 

the choice between a military coup (the only institution in the country with real authority) and letting an individual subsume the country's institutions to his will isn't a good choice.   Not only are coups like epilepsy <<<every time there is a coup, the credibility and strength of all the other institutions is weakened, and makes the liklihood of another coup the next time the country toys with civilian rule>>> but the military was the pillar of Mubarak's power.   

 

sometimes your choice is between gangrene and amputation, and you are not going to like either outcome, but one bad outcome is better than the other bad outcome.     ---      Morsi was looking like the worse outcome.

Morsi wasn't outlawing protests, he wasn't killing protesters, he wasn't ruling by fiat (although he may have tried to move in that direction although that is arguable), he wasn't squashing freedom of the press and freedom of assembly, he wasn't torturing protesters, he wasn't controlling a large part of the economy. The fact is that the choice was between a democratically elected government (as flawed as the Morsi administraiton may have been) and a bunch of murderous military leadership that showed time and again that it was willing to be just as if not more brutal than the Mubarak dictatorship. The choice there is clear, Morsi was nowhere near as bad as the military dictatorship before or after and at least he was elected by the Egyptian people in a free and fair election. Morsi in his wildest dreams couldn't have smothered Egyptian democracy the way the current military junta has.

 

When the revolution failed to remove the military from its powerful position in society (and I don't know if this was even possible) the revolution had already failed because until the military leadership and the role of the military changes this was an inevitable endind (military coup). It would have ended no differently if Sabahi had won the Presidency or anyone else because the military was always going to prevent reform, prevent democracy, and hold onto power no matter what. 

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Morsi was not a great leader and he was pretty oblivious to people's problems with him and his growing number of bad decisions. I also felt like he was losing it a bit in the last few days of his presidency where he kept ignoring the outcry and complaints against him and just repeated 'legitimacy' over and over.

But I don't recall him doing too much of the typical dictator road paving like you might see Putin or some other world leaders using to expand their power and remove checks and balances.

Yhe main thing he did that upset some was totry to replace judges who refused to prosecute former officials for crimes against protesters and he was a bit too enthusiastic for intervention Syria, hosting a religious summit in support of it and calling for a sort of jihad to that effect. (Reportedly the military was very freaked out by this and it was the last straw for them.)

Although seeing how Sisi so blatantly used all this to seize power for himself despite making the same power sharing promises morsi had made (and failing miserably to follow through on them after some initial attempts to works with Islamists and liberals before they mostly abandoned him) and judging by the leaks from people heavily involved in the protests against morsi saying that the military took advantage of them and took over part of their movement, it's likely that Sisi was planning this for a while.

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http://news.yahoo.com/convicted-egypt-academic-denounces-reign-terror-142930477.html

Convicted Egypt academic denounces 'reign of terror'

 

Egyptian authorities have unleashed a "reign of terror" against opponents of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, a prominent academic who was recently sentenced to death told AFP in an interview.

 

Emad Shahin, who fled Egypt in January 2014 and is a visiting professor at Washington-based Georgetown University, was handed the death penalty on Saturday in his absence with 15 others on charges of espionage.

 

"Such a verdict sends a message to the Egyptian people in general that the reign of terror continues and that it is extremely risky to oppose that regime," said Shahin, 57, referring to Sisi's government.

 

"I can't say I was shocked, because of the rate of sentences handed down by the Egyptian judiciary... anything was expected," Shahin, who has previously taught at Harvard and Columbia universities, said in a telephone interview.

 

Shahin and 35 co-defendants, including ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, were accused of spying for foreign powers, the Palestinian movement Hamas and Shiite Iran between 2005 and August 2013 to destabilise Egypt.

Ashraf El-Sherif, a professor at AUC who has known Shahin since 1998, said: "He is a democrat who believes in human rights, pluralism, and including moderate Islamists in the political process. That doesn't necessarily mean that he is an Islamist himself.

 

"He is an independent who opposed Mubarak's regime, supported January 25, opposed the Supreme Council of Armed Forces, and was even critical of Morsi himself," he said.

 

Shahin said he had never advised or met Morsi "officially or unofficially".

 

"Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood could not understand the nature, dynamic and depth of the Egyptian state. They were not revolutionary enough, and wanted to reform the state from within, so it devoured them," he said.

 

Shahin said he feels that his name was included in the list of defendants because he had criticised the "coup" that ousted Morsi.

 

"To me even if you have a weak democratic process, it is better than a strong authoritative system," he said.

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