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The Non-Winter Weather Thread


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4 hours ago, d0ublestr0ker0ll said:

Denver was at 100 yesterday, now its snowing.  Shoutout to @Chew

 

Storms firing up, middle of the country already experiencing what's in store for an interesting few days.  Can tell these popcorn storms around Tulsa are going to start getting worse today.

 

 

He sent me this at around noon: 

 

 

 

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Edited by skinsmarydu
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The latest: Hurricane-force winds topple hundreds of trees, knocking out power for 170,000. One death reported — and the storm isn’t done

 

Hurricane-force winds wreaked havoc across northern Utah on Tuesday toppling hundreds of huge trees, closing schools, and knocking out the power for more than 170,000 homes and businesses.

 

Gusts reaching at least 99 mph were recorded with the worst winds concentrated north of Salt Lake County, according to the National Weather Service. Area hospitals reported at least one death attributed to the storm — and it isn’t over yet, with heavy winds expected to last throughout the night and into early Wednesday.

 

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Hurricane Sally threatens Gulf Coast with "life threatening" and "historic" flooding

 

The National Hurricane Center is warning nearly 10 million Americans along the Gulf Coast to expect "life-threatening" and "historic" flooding in the next 12 hours as Hurricane Sally continues churning just south of Alabama. The unpredictable storm could dump several feet of rain from Louisiana to Florida when it roars ashore near Mobile Bay, Alabama, on Tuesday.

 

The storm's outer bands are lashing parts of the coast, and the storm could spin-off tornadoes later Tuesday night. Sally is proving to be a challenge to predict, changing her speed and intensity several times over the past 24 hours. Forecasters are warning that more surprises could be in store.

 

As of Tuesday afternoon, the storm was located about 80 miles south of Mobile, Alabama, and about 90 miles southwest of Pensacola, Florida, the hurricane center said. The storm was moving north at 2 mph, with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph.

 

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On 9/14/2020 at 8:16 PM, CousinsCowgirl84 said:


Despite a lot of storms this hurricane season hasn’t been that destructive compared to past years.... remember maria and Harvey?


It takes a lot of variables to align for a powerful hurricane to hit a populated area. Been lucky this year (so far, but it’s still early). 


But say in 50 year we are averaging 15 more named storms per year than we were 50 years ago. That’s a lot more chances for those variables to all hit in a given year. 

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Alabama and Florida residents struggle with Sally's flooding as remnants threaten more misery in Georgia and the Carolinas

 

Coastal Alabama and the Florida Panhandle face a daunting recovery Thursday, as ponds of floodwater and chunks of debris surround homes and businesses a day after a deadly Hurricane Sally walloped the coast with winds and feet of rain.

 

Sally's remnants still threaten more flooding Thursday as they push into Georgia and the Carolinas.


But it already has left plenty of misery along the Gulf Coast. At least one person is dead and one is missing in Alabama's Orange Beach, Mayor Tony Kennon told CNN affiliate WSFA, after Sally blew ashore as a Category 2 hurricane early Wednesday.

 

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In both states, including around Pensacola in Florida, downed trees and power lines have made roads dangerous, and authorities have set up curfews and used boats and high-water vehicles to help hundreds escape their flooded or flood-surrounded homes.


In Orange Beach, coastal neighborhoods remained covered by water hours after the storm.


"Everything on the ground floor is gone," Matt Wilson told CNN affiliate WPMI Wednesday about his Orange Beach home, where he and his family rode out part of the deluge.

 

"Our house had windows blow out at 3 a.m. or 4 a.m. (Wednesday) and the whole house was shaking like a boat on the water," he said. " ... We ended up leaving the house during the eye of the storm, and waded through about 5 feet of water to get to the neighbor's house, arm in arm."


Sally moved extremely slowly over these areas, dumping sheets of rain -- in some places 2 feet or more -- that caused extensive flooding for miles.


"We had 30 inches of rain in Pensacola -- 30-plus inches of rain -- which is four months of rain in four hours," Pensacola Fire Chief Ginny Cranor said.

 

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We're getting hurricanes in the Mediterranean now.  And yet still there are people that don't believe in climate change.

 

Medicane Storm Ianos lashes western Greece

 

A rare hurricane-like storm is lashing islands in western Greece, bringing torrential rain and power cuts.


Storm Ianos is described as a "medicane" (Mediterranean hurricane), a phenomenon that first appeared in Greece in 1995.

 

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The cyclone is moving eastwards, so at the weekend the winds - now up to 117km/h (73mph) - are set to hit the Peloponnese, then Athens and Crete.

 

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Beta weakens to tropical depression, stalls over Texas coast

 

Beta weakened to a tropical depression Tuesday as it parked itself over the Texas coast, raising concerns of extensive flooding in Houston and areas further inland.

 

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Beta made landfall late Monday as a tropical storm just north of Port O’Connor, Texas, and has the distinction of being the first time a storm named for a Greek letter made landfall in the continental United States. Forecasters ran out of traditional storm names last week, forcing the use of the Greek alphabet for only the second time since the 1950s.

 

By mid-morning Tuesday, Beta was 15 miles (25 kilometers) east-northeast of Victoria, Texas, with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph (55 kph), the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. The storm was moving toward the northeast at 2 mph (4 kilometers) and is expected to stall inland over Texas through Wednesday.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hurricane Delta to bring 100 mph winds to Yucatan tonight, sights still set on U.S. gulf shore

 

Hurricane Delta, currently churning in the Caribbean Sea with more than 100 mph maximum sustained winds, is expected to clip Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula over the next few days before setting its sights on the Louisiana coastline later this week, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in a 5 a.m. update.

 

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As of 5 a.m. ET on Tuesday, Delta is a Category 2 hurricane moving west-northwest at 15 mph.

 

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Tracking the Tropics: Hurricane Delta rapidly strengthens to Category 4 with 130 mph winds

 

Hurricane Delta continued its pattern of rapid strengthening and reached major Category 4 strength on Tuesday morning.

 

The National Hurricane Center said at 11 a.m. ET that NOAA Hurricane Hunters data indicated Delta had reached major Category 3 hurricane strength. Less than 30 minutes later, the NHC updated its advisory to say Hurricane Hunters data showed Delta had strengthened to a Category 4 hurricane with 130 mph winds.

 

At 11:30 a.m., the NHC reported Delta was about 315 miles east-southeast of Cozumel, Mexico and 125 miles southwest of Grand Cayman. It’s moving west-northwest at 16 mph.

Delta is expected to pass the Cayman Islands Tuesday afternoon and move over the northeastern portion of the Yucatan Peninsula later in the night or early Wednesday.

 

After it passes the peninsula, Delta is forecast to move into the southern Gulf of Mexico and eventually reach the northern Gulf Coast of the United States later this week. While some weakening is expected when Delta moves over the Yucatan Peninsula, it’s expected to re-strengthen again when it moves over the Gulf.

 

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On 9/15/2020 at 10:03 PM, skinsfan_1215 said:


It takes a lot of variables to align for a powerful hurricane to hit a populated area. Been lucky this year (so far, but it’s still early). 


But say in 50 year we are averaging 15 more named storms per year than we were 50 years ago. That’s a lot more chances for those variables to all hit in a given year. 

I've said this before but looking at all this I can only think we're really lucky that climate change is just a Chinese hoax because we'd really be screwed then.🙄

 

Seriously though, aside from the large overall cost per storm, I think @CousinsCowgirl84's view fails to take into account what increasing the frequency of storms can do to an area. If you experience a really bad storm and lose everything once in a lifetime or once every 20 years or so, you can recover from it and life goes on. If you get hit with one of these every decade, it won't be too long before you just decide to leave because how many times can someone start over from scratch? This scenario is already playing out in California at least to some degree with the wildfires.

Edited by The Sisko
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Gamma has now taken Delta over.  Saw an even worse outlook earlier this morning. 

And like Sisko said...it would only take once for me.  I'm an Aquarius born in Florida, total water baby...I moved to Atlanta from Jacksonville. After everything I've seen over the last 30 years, you couldn't pay me to live there again. 

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57 minutes ago, The Sisko said:

 

Seriously though, aside from the large overall cost per storm, I think @CousinsCowgirl84's view fails to take into account what increasing the frequency of storms can do to an area. 


 

my point of view is that storms this year have been less destructive despite their increase in frequency. At that’s not an opinion or a way of looking at it, it’s an objective fact, both in terms of death and damage.

 

 

as to your argument that 10 storms that are weaker being worse than one stronger one, I don’t know about that. Katrina took a lot longer to recover from than Cristobal did... and I think you would rather have 20 cristobals than one Katrina.... 

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1 minute ago, CousinsCowgirl84 said:


 

my point of view is that storms this year have been less destructive despite their increase in frequency. At that’s not an opinion or a way of looking at it, it’s an objective fact, both in terms of death and damage.

Some days, like today, I actually question your humanity.  Swear, you're a bot. 

THIS YEAR.  That's what you're judging this on?

 Just another indication that stupidity is absolutely free. 

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