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The Non-Winter Weather Thread


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5 hours ago, Malapropismic Depository said:

Anyone know the answer to this :

Hypothetically, if the eye of this storm makes landfall on the east coast, in a worst case scenario, how many miles inland could the Category 3 to 4 winds extend on this particular storm ?

I believe that depends on a lot of things like the strength of the storm, the direction of the storm, the direction of the winds, inland topography, stuff like that.  I don't think there is any hard and fast rule.

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3 hours ago, Passepartout said:

Matthew is coming but it seems it will be one very wet Florida and Carolina coast. Have not had a huge hurricane since Sandy in 2012!

This will be far worse.

A lot of hurricanes, regardless of size, are either wet, windy or various speeds.

We're talking 40+ rain possible, 200mph gusts, with 140+mph sustained wind and its moving less than 6mph and has even stopped.

That's what makes this so dangerous. It doesn't blow through. It's like a 500 mile wide cyclone sitting on your home and not leaving until everything is destroyed.

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7 hours ago, Springfield said:

I believe that depends on a lot of things like the strength of the storm, the direction of the storm, the direction of the winds, inland topography, stuff like that.  I don't think there is any hard and fast rule.

yeah the core size varies greatly, believe it is about 40 miles from the eye now

tornadoes are more a worry in the outer bands

add

doesn't look too bad unless it shifts

DCT_SPECIAL26_1280x720.jpg

that is probabilities of 75 mph winds

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It's tough waiting around on this thing to see what is going to happen.  The tides have already been really high.  We're getting some nuisance flooding in Norfolk, hours before high tide, on a day with no rainfall.  If this thing dumps a ton of rain and pushes in a big surge then it'll make Norfolk impassable.  Ground is really soft too after that tropical storm that came through and gave us like 10 inches of rain a little over a week ago.  Another big storm means there will be a lot of downed trees.

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Fresh new update from NOAA Hurricane Center:

 

14517478_1176578202407658_84686084084485

That's a projection for sustained winds of 110 mph hitting the Atlantic coast of FL on friday morning.  TryTheBeal is correct, too.  Look at how it could peal off at the Carolinas.  Bit of a chance that it could loop under and back west in to the coast again.  That's too far in to the future to give a solid prediction for.  For now, FL is on high alert.

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4 hours ago, stevemcqueen1 said:

It's tough waiting around on this thing to see what is going to happen.  The tides have already been really high.  We're getting some nuisance flooding in Norfolk, hours before high tide, on a day with no rainfall.  If this thing dumps a ton of rain and pushes in a big surge then it'll make Norfolk impassable.  Ground is really soft too after that tropical storm that came through and gave us like 10 inches of rain a little over a week ago.  Another big storm means there will be a lot of downed trees.

Just received word from my son who goes to ODU that they are telling them to go home if possible or at least make plans to leave the Hampton Roads area by Friday night. The Football game that was scheduled for Saturday night has been moved to Friday night. Will be heading to ODU Friday morning, watch the game and head home after with my son. Bring him back Tuesday. 

I just hope that Matthew is pushed back out to the Atlantic by Saturday and doesn't turn west. That will just put it in my back yard in Maryland.

Hope everyone stays safe during this Hurricane.

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At least not on the first pass. 

It has been known to happen, where they go pack out to sea, circle around, and come back, again.  But that's way too far out for the models to predict. 

Heck, see that "cone", on the map?  All that cone says is that there's a 60% chance that the center of the storm will be between those lines.  (Meaning a 40% chance that it will be outside them.  And that's just the center of the storm.) 

So, I'm taking a fuzzy projection, and then extrapolating it, here, but there's like a 10% chance that the center of the storm passes through Tampa.  (On the gulf coast of Florida.) 

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