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I wonder how far inland the storm surge goes?  We're about 5 miles inland, near I-95. Sister lives beside a man made pond; hopefully that doesn't get blown into the house.

Can only wait and see what happens and hopefully be able to get in touch with my sister in the afternoon after the storm has passed Melbourne area.  Saw some people reporting from Palm Bay-Melbourne.  Looked scary.

My parents don't realize just how close to the coast we are; so that's good. So they won't worry as much.

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21 minutes ago, Rdskns2000 said:

I wonder how far inland the storm surge goes?  We're about 5 miles inland, near I-95. Sister lives beside a man made pond; hopefully that doesn't get blown into the house.

 

 

Well, the storm is not going to cause water to magically appear out of the ground. 

But, if the lake is on a river that drains into the ocean, then obviously, there's going to be huge amounts of rain, upstream, and the water not draining, downstream. 

Edited by Larry

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55 minutes ago, Rdskns2000 said:

I wonder how far inland the storm surge goes?  We're about 5 miles inland, near I-95. Sister lives beside a man made pond; hopefully that doesn't get blown into the house.

Can only wait and see what happens and hopefully be able to get in touch with my sister in the afternoon after the storm has passed Melbourne area.  Saw some people reporting from Palm Bay-Melbourne.  Looked scary.

My parents don't realize just how close to the coast we are; so that's good. So they won't worry as much.

 

depends on the elevation and direction, goes quite a ways here, not familiar with Melborne

5 miles is nothing if flat

add

 looks like that area is decent elevation

https://coast.noaa.gov/slr/

 

Edited by twa

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We had a 12 foot storm surge a full week after Mathew passed us. 1,000 miles away and still getting rain and wind from it.

This is an update from my friend in the lower peninsula of Haiti. She sailed in ahead of the storm. If anyone is thinking of donating, please check the link out. Small on the ground charities are the best way to help. They were destroyed and the death toll is hardly accurate. This was written by my friends daughter.

 

In the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, seeing the devastation of Southern Haiti, we are all at a loss for words.

To many, this is just another tragic story in the news, of an impoverished country dealing with yet another natural disaster. I think it's very important that we remember that these are people - hundreds of thousands of individuals - who have struggled and worked hard with what little they've been given to rebuild their lives after the devastating earthquake of 2010. They were nowhere near done rebuilding when Hurricane Matthew swept their lives away once again.

Hearing some people's comments about Haiti, I feel that I need to stress that these were natural disasters. These were not any fault of the people or their country. No one could have been prepared for these events, and certainly not a nation already suffering such intense poverty. These people are not lazy, they are not weak, they are not hopeless. They would like to build stable lives and a functional economy, things that we often take for granted. They deserve our full and whole-hearted empathy, and they need our help.

Rebuilding will be a long process, starting with securing emergency food, medical, and building supplies. Communities are gathering together, helping each other, but when everyones' losses are so great there is little to go around. There will be no crops from Southern Haiti this season, and it will take many years for the fruit trees to grow back, for lands flooded by storm surge to be viable again, and for livestock to be replenished.

Once again, it is time to rally for the people of Haiti. Not just today, but for the coming weeks, months, and years as they work to overcome this devastation.

Many non-profits are working on the ground in Haiti. If you're in a position to help, please do. Donate to whichever organization is closest to your heart, but keep in mind that the smaller "grassroots" organizations generally have far lower overheads and are able to work more quickly in their communities due to less bureaucracy than some of the larger aid organizations.

In closing, I will reiterate what I wrote as Hurricane Matthew first landed in Haiti when asked how people could best help:

Monetary donations are always the most useful in situations like this. It takes too long (weeks if not months) and costs too much to transport physical items in a time of crisis, when roads, airports, etc are damaged. There will be building materials, food, etc available in Haiti, the main challenge is being able to acquire them in a timely manner. Monetary donations allow for immediate purchase of locally sourced materials for repairs, along with bulk quantities of basic food items for distribution through emergency shelters (schools, churches, etc). This also helps to stabilize the economy, by purchasing locally rather than flooding the market with donated imports.

*Update: I did hear this morning from a connection of Mandy's near Port Au Prince, Haiti, that officials yesterday were able to reestablish transport past the collapsed bridge in Petit Goave. No further communication from Mandy as of this morning.*

If you feel moved to donate to Mandy's non-profit, Good Samaritan Foundation of Haiti, Inc., please follow the link below - the yellow donate button is on the left as you scroll down. All donated funds will go directly into emergency food and medicine to be distributed through the school and building materials to begin repairs on homes in the area. Most homes on the island lost roofs and sustained other damages.

http://www.goodsamaritanofhaiti.com/

Please share...

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http://www.orlandosentinel.com/weather/hurricane/os-hurricane-matthew-florida-story.html

Quote

The storm, which weakened to a Category 3 overnight, was about 45 miles east of Melbourne as of 4 a.m. It had 120 mph winds and was moving north-northwest at 13 mph. The storm moved slightly east late Thursday, which forecasters say will most likely keep it from making landfall in the state. Further weakening is predicted. 

Forecasters say Brevard County is seeing sustained winds of 40 mph, and peak wind gusts have been measured from 90 to 100 mph. In Volusia, 60 mph winds have been raking the coast. 

That's a lot weaker than what forecasters thought the storm would bring as it neared Central Florida. 

"We've been really blessed," said WOFL-Fox 35 meteorologist Jayme King. "The slight jog to the east is going to be really beneficial to the coastal communities and all of Central Florida." 

King said the storm was going to be catastrophic for Brevard and Volusia counties, but the slight adjustment has changed everything. 

"It's really a different ball game now," he said. "This storm was going to be unlike anything these communities had ever seen. It's still a dangerous and powerful storm, but the outlook has improved significantly."

Whew. Kennedy Space Center (and Orlando) avoids the killshot from the Euro model.

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Eye is right offshore.  Looks like it'll be riding the coast all day, and perhaps through Saturday, in remarkably uniform fashion.  Cat 3 with gusts around the eye reaching the mid 100s right now.  Weakening has commenced for what should be the last time, but there's a ways to go before it's not a highly dangerous storm.

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http://www.goodsamaritanofhaiti.com/

I know there's a lot of people hurting from this, but no one as bad as Haiti.

This is a solid charity run by a friend who's there now. 

If they're saying 300 dead, it's probably 3 or 4 times that many at least and it'll continue to climb long after we stop talking about it.

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Well, so far, (there's still wind, here), total impact on me, personally, is a tree branch fell down in the driveway. 

:)

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My elderly inlaws live right on the beach on a barrier island just south of Charleston.   They have evacuated, and have been told that there is a reasonable chance that they will not have a home to go back to.   Ugh.

And poor Haiti.  Haiti will never catch a break.  

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