Dan T.

Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired

Recommended Posts

I'm shocked. 

 

That they didn't go along with it. 

 

(Although, noting that the article has really bold accusations, and no support whatsoever.) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I missed this one, was it posted somewhere?

 

The death of Freddie Gray: Baltimore protests grow

 

(CNN)The emotions are raw and protests are growing in Baltimore, where a community wants answers in the death of Freddie Gray.

As protesters chanted "No justice, no peace!" Tuesday evening, Gray's distraught mother, Gloria Darden, collapsed in tears at the spot where her son was arrested this month. She was whisked away.

 

Gray, a 25-year-old black man, died of a spinal injury Sunday, exactly one week after he was taken into custody.

 

The demonstrations are gaining momentum. The crowd will be back on Wednesday in front of the Western District police station where Gray was taken after his arrest.

 

On Thursday, they will rally in front of City Hall.

 

"We won't stop," one man said Tuesday. "We have the power and, of course, today shows we have the numbers."

Feds getting involved

The increasing public pressure comes as the Department of Justice announced it was opening an investigation into the case.

A spokesman said the agency is investigating whether Gray's civil rights were violated during the April 12 arrest.

 

At the local level, the Maryland Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights says that when an officer is under investigation in a matter that could lead to disciplinary action, supervisors are prohibited from interviewing the accused officer for 10 days.

 

The state law doesn't make clear whether the 10-day period begins at the time of the incident or the time of the complaint stemming from the incident. House Delegate Mary Washington told CNN that the prohibition expired Wednesday (10 days since Gray's arrest) and the six officers who were suspended can now be interviewed.

 

An autopsy found that Gray died from a spinal cord injury, but Baltimore Deputy Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez told reporters Monday that there is no indication of how the injury occurred.

 

...

 

What We Know

 

According to documents, the incident began when Gray ran from police.

 

While the court documents allege that one of the arresting officers, Garrett Miller, took Gray into custody after finding a switchblade in his pocket, Murphy called the allegation a "sideshow." Gray was carrying a "pocket knife of legal size," he said.

 

Police never saw the knife and chased Gray only after he took off running, the attorney said.

 

That seems substantiated by court documents that say Gray "fled unprovoked upon noticing police presence."

 

"The officer noticed a knife clipped to the inside of (Gray's) front right pants pocket. The defendant was arrested without force or incident," the documents say. "The knife was recovered by this officer and found to be a spring assisted, one-hand-operated knife."

 

Click on the link for the full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tulsa Sheriff’s Office Supervisors Reportedly Ordered To Falsify Robert Bates’ Training Records

http://www.buzzfeed.com/maryanngeorgantopoulos/tulsa-sheriffs-office-supervisors-reportedly-ordered-to-fals

Uh oh. If true - this is going to get ugly.

 

Taking a step back from the primary issue/concern/outrage for just a second... (mainly because I have nothing important to add to that)

 

There are apparently a number of people who were transferred/moved/fired/whatever because they refused to go along with the falsifying of records or because they spoke out against what was going on.

 

(I have no evidence of that but I've heard/read that accusation quite a few times)

 

So why didn't these people do something about it? They had an opportunity to prevent the tragedy, yet didn't. I get that the primary concern is with the people 'directly' responsible for this situation, but I personally find this other part of the issue equally as important. In my opinion you have the duty, not just as an officer but as a person living in our society, to report this sort of thing.

 

Though, the way this country has started treating whistle blowers (general public and federal government alike) lately in regards to national security/military issues, I suppose I shouldn't be surprised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would take a butt whooping for 650k

How much of that goes to legal fees, taxes, and medical fees?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much of that goes to legal fees, taxes, and medical fees?

probably 650k on top of medical costs.  legal fees (i think) are paid by prosecution/defense if you win the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

see...white people are targeted too :)

 

"Walker revealed the group would often target white “college-boy” types who they believed to be easy to intimidate."

 

http://www.inquisitr.com/2010760/officer-jeffrey-walker-planted-drugs-too-many-times-to-count/

by black people, even (though the picture, oddly, doesn't show what color the officer is).

Edited by Roger.Staubach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follow-up:

 

 

DEA Agents Left College Student in Cell for Five Days, Receive Light Punishments

 

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents who left a 23-year-old UC San Diego student locked in a holding cell for five days without food or water received only light punishments, according to the Justice Department.

 

In a Friday letter to Sen. Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa), the Justice Department revealed that, of the six DEA agents involved in the near-fatal incident, four received letters of reprimand and two were given week-long suspensions without pay.

 

In 2012, DEA agents detained University of California San Diego student Daniel Chong following a raid on his friend’s house, where Chong had gone to smoke marijuana. The agent told Chong he would be released following an interrogation.

 

Instead, Chong was left handcuffed in a windowless holding cell by himself for five days without food, water or a toilet while agents ignored his cries for help. When an agent finally opened the door to Chong’s cell, Chong was delirious and so dehydrated that he had resorted to drinking his own urine. Chong was hospitalized for four days following his release and had to undergo extensive therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

The government later agreed to a $4.1 million settlement with Chong to avoid a lawsuit.

 

In its letter to Grassley, the Justice Department said “what happened to Mr. Chong is unacceptable.”

 

“While DEA leadership took immediate steps following the incident to implement protocols and procedures with regard to monitoring holding cells and detainees, given the significant misconduct at issue, the Department has serious concerns about the adequacy of the discipline that DEA imposed on these employees,” the Justice Department continued. “DEA’s failure to impose significant discipline on these employees further demonstrates the need for a systematic review of DEA’s disciplinary process, which former Attorney General Eric Holder recently directed.”

 

Click on the link for the full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a letter of reprimand and a week long suspension doesn't quite seem like appropriate punishment.

 

unless the weeklong suspension included being locked in a windowless room with no food or water and forced to drink their own urine...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost killing someone via denying them food and water results in a strongly worded letter? Yet another piece of evidence demonstrating a laughable lack of accountability amongst US law enforcement.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So why didn't these people do something about it? They had an opportunity to prevent the tragedy, yet didn't. I get that the primary concern is with the people 'directly' responsible for this situation, but I personally find this other part of the issue equally as important. In my opinion you have the duty, not just as an officer but as a person living in our society, to report this sort of thing.

Though, the way this country has started treating whistle blowers (general public and federal government alike) lately in regards to national security/military issues, I suppose I shouldn't be surprised.

Sorry to be late on this but Yes. Thank you. Been saying this for years. People say oh only 10 20,25 whatever, percentage of cops are dirty. But if there's an incident where ten cops show up, and two of them pull some dirty ****--beat the **** out of someone, plant evidence, whatever--and the other 8 cops don't stop it or don't at least report and make sure something is done, guess what? All ****ing 10 of those cops are dirty Edited by G.A.C.O.L.B.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follow-up:

 

 

DEA Agents Left College Student in Cell for Five Days, Receive Light Punishments

 

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents who left a 23-year-old UC San Diego student locked in a holding cell for five days without food or water received only light punishments, according to the Justice Department.

 

In a Friday letter to Sen. Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa), the Justice Department revealed that, of the six DEA agents involved in the near-fatal incident, four received letters of reprimand and two were given week-long suspensions without pay.

 

In 2012, DEA agents detained University of California San Diego student Daniel Chong following a raid on his friend’s house, where Chong had gone to smoke marijuana. The agent told Chong he would be released following an interrogation.

 

Instead, Chong was left handcuffed in a windowless holding cell by himself for five days without food, water or a toilet while agents ignored his cries for help. When an agent finally opened the door to Chong’s cell, Chong was delirious and so dehydrated that he had resorted to drinking his own urine. Chong was hospitalized for four days following his release and had to undergo extensive therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

The government later agreed to a $4.1 million settlement with Chong to avoid a lawsuit.

 

In its letter to Grassley, the Justice Department said “what happened to Mr. Chong is unacceptable.”

 

“While DEA leadership took immediate steps following the incident to implement protocols and procedures with regard to monitoring holding cells and detainees, given the significant misconduct at issue, the Department has serious concerns about the adequacy of the discipline that DEA imposed on these employees,” the Justice Department continued. “DEA’s failure to impose significant discipline on these employees further demonstrates the need for a systematic review of DEA’s disciplinary process, which former Attorney General Eric Holder recently directed.”

 

Click on the link for the full article

 

 

that is just, absolutely unbelievable. 

 

Start hitting them in the wallet.  Hope this guy gets a $billion dollars... hope the settlement is so big it wrecks the economy.  And the nation can thank these 5 DEA douchebags for it.  Might be a little more than a strongly worded letter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I ever get to a computer where I can legitimately type it out and not try to swipe it out on a smart phone, I'll share my story about me and how the BP beat the **** out of me, left me in a cell for almost 3 days, then almost deported me to Mexico (was in line to get on the bus, like 3 people away, probably would've been the best outcome) then realized I was a white guy, took my phone, my money and my shoes and dropped me off so random spot in the mountains of western San Diego Co. Well really share it, with details. And what then happened with it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just using this as the bad/douche cop thread. Don't think this douche should necessarily be fired. He's just a douche.

http://news.yahoo.com/officer-waited-hours-getting-starbucks-burn-treated-164029306.html

After severely burning himself with a free cup of Starbucks coffee, a North Carolina police officer suing the coffee chain says he waited hours and...

Continued at link

Edited by G.A.C.O.L.B.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Precedent is already set. If you can sue McDonalds for hot coffee, you can sue Starbucks.

You can sue anybody for anything. WINNING takes considerably more. (At least most of the time. No doubt there are numerous exceptions).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Precedent is already set. If you can sue McDonalds for hot coffee, you can sue Starbucks.

I call complete BS....

Starbucks Coffee is NEVER hot :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knocked him unconscious, dislocated his jaw.

Edited by Chew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knocked him unconscious, dislocated his jaw.

Obviously he didn't comply quickly enough. Cop was just trying to keep everyone safe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knocked him unconscious, dislocated his jaw.

I'm really finding it hard to believe the pro cop crowd when they claim the dirty cops are just a small minority of the police force nationwide.

Edited by Gamebreaker
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this thread needs more RAGE

 

 

Just doing my part for the Revolution...

 

"it's got to start some place, it's got to start sometime...what better place than Extremeskins?  What better time than NOW!"

 

 

OH....YEA!!!!!  Can't stop us NOW!!!

 

LMAO

 

Sincerely, 

 

A member of the "Evil Empire"  

 

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.