Dan T.

Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired

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So basically, 73 year old Robert Bates should've never been there. That's just perfect. He donates a lot of equipment to the department, and they thank him by letting him do a job he is not qualified to do.

 

From the looks of it he was basically doing a ride a long and was obviously not part of the arrest team.

 

the guy running and escaping from that team brought him in contact....he probably should have stayed in the car though.

 

it says he was qualified

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His actions show he wasn't qualified. 

 

Even the qualified screw up, in every field.

 

which is why painkiller and myself keep saying to not expose yourself to them screwing up.

 

Oops in that line of work can obviously be deadly

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Really bizarre followup on the Tulsa case: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2015/04/deputy-who-killed-man-after-mistaking-gun-for-taser-is-an-insurance-exec-who-pays-to-play-cop/

 

"According to Tulsa World, Robert Bates, 73, who made the fatal mistake that cost a man his life, is a local insurance company executive who has donated multiple vehicles, weapons, and stun guns to the Sheriff’s Office since becoming a reserve deputy in 2008."

 

 

 

I bet a lot of attorneys are really interested in finding out how good his insurance is.  And whether he sold any, to the city. 

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Those cops in the wal mart video are clearly nazis

Children hitting Nazi!

That video is incredible. The crazy family started a brawl with police, while two of them appeared to fight each other. It's a minor miracle most of them survived. They seemed to really want to press their luck.

Great job by police though it does seem they should have waited for more reinforcements. 20 more officers or so would have done it.

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while two of them appeared to fight each other.

You talking about two of the police or two of the family members? Cause big dude in blue who was rocking out the whole video, especially with the one kid for like the first five freaking straight minutes was Walmart security. And yes he was supposed to be there. I got no problems whatsoever with the cops in that vid. Props to them.

That said, goddamn it feels good to see the rest of the country wake up to what I've known for 20 ****ing years now. Boy do I have stories.

Btw,if you think the police are bad, just imagine CO's. They're the ones who were too ****ty and dumb to be cops. We got a huge prison problem in this country. I got faith that it's just a matter of time until that blows up too. If our politicians weren't such pussies, we've had that debate long ago. It's got to come from the people.

Edited by G.A.C.O.L.B.

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I bet a lot of attorneys are really interested in finding out how good his insurance is.  And whether he sold any, to the city. 

 

Yeah the vultures be circling  :P

 

Kinda ironic he probably bought the video glasses that captured his screw up.

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.

Its not in the news because thats what they are supposed to do. The police officers that are abusing their power should repeatedly be put in the news and called out for it. Are you saying we should ignore the cops that abuse their power or go beyond what they should b e doing?

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Btw,if you think the police are bad, just imagine CO's. They're the ones who were too ****ty and dumb to be cops. We got a huge prison problem in this country. I got faith that it's just a matter of time until that blows up too. If our politicians weren't such pussies, we've had that debate long ago. It's got to come from the people.

LMAO

Got to love the internets. Good luck with your revolution. If you are not familiar I strongly recommend you check out Rage against he Machine.

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LMAO

Got to love the internets. Good luck with your revolution. If you are not familiar I strongly recommend you check out Rage against he Machine.

Sorry I hurt your feelings. Look at the bright side. At least you're not mall cop ****ty. Edited by G.A.C.O.L.B.

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This one happened down the road from Charlotte in Gastonia, NC.  Tad different, since the man did have a gun pointed at officers, but odd they would decide to do a welfare check near midnight.  Guy probably thought someone was breaking into his home since they busted down the door.

 

 

Link is from the WSOC channel 9 news website:

http://www.wsoctv.com/news/news/local/officials-gastonia-police-officer-involved-fatal-s/nj6t8/

 

Edit:  missed the part where the relative called the police at 10pm asking them to check on him.  They knock on the door at 10:30 pm, where a 73 year old man, hard of hearing who is recovering from heart surgery and he doesn't answer.  Man was probably sleeping.  

 

After checking local hospitals with no luck they thought he may be dead inside.  Why not think of the possibility that he was sleeping?  Why not contact the family and ask them to either come over with a key to check inside or wait until tomorrow morning and see if he responded?  

 

I think it could have been avoided, but understand the threat presented to the officer.  

Edited by Dont Taze Me Bro

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Sorry I hurt your feelings. Look at the bright side. At least you're not mall cop ****ty.

You did not hurt my feelings dude, lol.

Your post was obviously directed at me and I did not want to disappoint you. If you could pick my brain over what I have heard and experienced in my career...believe me what you said would be a insignificant after thought.

Peace

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:huh:  In Tulsa, wealthy people get to run around as cops. Holy ****.

 

The insurance company executive served as chairman of Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glantz's 2012 re-election effort and donated $2,500 to the sheriff's campaign that year, the Tulsa World reported.

 

Bates also donated thousands of dollars worth of equipment to the sheriff's office, according to the report. Clark told the newspaper that Bates had donated vehicles, guns and Tasers to the agency.

 

Many of the agency's 130 reserve deputies are wealthy donors, Clark said.

 

“There are lots of wealthy people in the reserve program,” he told the Tulsa World. “Many of them make donations of items. That’s not unusual at all.”

 

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/eric-harris-shooting-robert-bates

Edited by Duckus

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IF they get training to do so, ya know, just like poor folk.(those w/o records of course :P )

Odd ya object to people performing civic duties and even giving needed items.

Donating is great. Donating equipment is great. Being involved is great.

Giving a 73 man a gun and putting him in the position of killing someone is not great.

Having this be a "perk" for rich people is absolutely terrifying.

Edited by Duckus
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Donating is great. Donating equipment is great. Being involved is great.

Giving a 73 man a gun and putting him in the position of killing someone is not great.

Having this be a "perk" for rich people is absolutely terrifying.

 

 

they don't usually give them guns, they can qualify to carry them and buy them though.

 

If he wouldn't have run he would not have been in that position, kinda tough to remove old folk from the general area if they don't wanna go in the old folk homes.

 

a perk ?....has it happened before?(not that I would call facing manslaughter a perk myself  :P )

 

add

 

charged w/2nd degree manslaughter....WEEE! what a thrill

Edited by twa

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You did not hurt my feelings dude, lol.

Your post was obviously directed at me and I did not want to disappoint you. If you could pick my brain over what I have heard and experienced in my career...believe me what you said would be a insignificant after thought.

Peace

I swear to God that my post wasn't directed at you. I knew someone on here was a CO, wouldn't be able to remember who, and even if I could, I wasn't thinking about them when I posted what I posted. So don't take it personal. When you replied to my original post I just assumed you must be the CO and shot back as such.

And ftr, like everything, from the Nazis and Communist Party to the police and CO's, there are horrible ones and there are genuinely good guys with good intentions. I've met a few CO's who I almost assuredly have been friends with in a different life.

So that said, when I say we have a major prison problem in this country and it's just a matter of time until the people wake up (like they seemingly now have with the police, thank the gods), I'm not at all talking about CO's. I'm talking about overcrowding, unfair, even ridiculous, sentencing for nonviolent crimes and also difference in sentencing based on race, and I'm especially talking about the recidivism rate. IIRC 2/3's of all prisoners are back in prison within 3 years.

Like I've said before on here, I met just as many good people in prison as I did in the Army. And I honestly wouldn't be surprised if a majority of the prisoners weren't veterans (keep in mind this was federal prison, not rinky dink county jail (I've actually never been in County jail save for a night for drunk in public when I was 18), so different class of criminals. I'm sure there are still quite a few veterans in county though.

Anyway, if people are people and a majority of folks locked up really ain't all that bad, why the high recidivism rate? Because being a convicted felon is no different than having the Mark of the Beast printed on your ****ing forehead. So you grow up in a ****ty environment, you **** up and get into some **** while you're young, locked up a few years, have a felony conviction or two on your record when you get out. Now say you've got a couple kids need taking care of or your folks are old and can't work anymore and need all the help they can get. You want to get a job. But who's hiring felons that pays a living wage? So what are you going to do? It's a big reason why our ghettos stay ghettos.

One thing that's always made me laugh, something I've seen/noticed over and over. Older folks are as pro-police and prison as they can get. Normally older white folks, I'm not gonna lie. Guess what happens when one of their kids or loved ones catches a case? They wake up REAL fast. Become more outspoken than damn near anyone. So hey, keep setting records on prison pop sizes (records worldwide btw--unless you're counting North Korea where God only knows how many they got). A majority are going to wake up eventually.

Edited by G.A.C.O.L.B.
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Anyway, if people are people and a majority of folks locked up really ain't all that bad, why the high recidivism rate? Because being a convicted felon is no different than having the Mark of the Beast printed on your ****ing forehead. So you grow up in a ****ty environment, you **** up and get into some **** while you're young, locked up a few years, have a felony conviction or two on your record when you get out. Now say you've got a couple kids need taking care of or your folks are old and can't work anymore and need all the help they can get. You want to get a job. But who's hiring felons that pays a living wage? So what are you going to do? It's a big reason why our ghettos stay ghettos.

 

Luckily 'Ban the Box' is making huge strides so felony discrimination will start to deteriorate (in positions where it shouldn't matter).

 

http://www.nelp.org/campaign/ensuring-fair-chance-to-work/

 

The movement has doubled in the past year and it's going to start being pulled out of the application for work (work with an online job company so this has come up and it'll be removed from all applications sooner rather than later - just have to go through legal steps).

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In this day and age they should remove arrest records from public view if charges are dropped or result in an acquittal.

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So that said, when I say we have a major prison problem in this country and it's just a matter of time until the people wake up (like they seemingly now have with the police, thank the gods), I'm not at all talking about CO's. I'm talking about overcrowding, unfair, even ridiculous, sentencing for nonviolent crimes and also difference in sentencing based on race, and I'm especially talking about the recidivism rate. IIRC 2/3's of all prisoners are back in prison within 3 years.

 

 

The New York Times Magazine had a prison-related issue just two weeks ago.  This article about how prison ****s up people who are otherwise pretty rational is eye-opening, if not harrowing.  Worth the read:

 

Inside America's Toughest Federal Prison

by Mark Binelli

 

In prison, Rodney Jones told me, everyone had a nickname. Jones’s was Saint E’s, short for St. Elizabeths, the federal psychiatric hospital in Washington, best known for housing John Hinckley Jr. after he shot Ronald Reagan. Jones spent time there as well, having shown signs of mental illness from an early age; he first attempted suicide at 12, when he drank an entire bottle of Clorox. Later, he became addicted to PCP and crack and turned to robbery to support his habit.

 

I met Jones a few blocks from his childhood home in LeDroit Park, a D.C. neighborhood not far from Howard University. It was a warm October afternoon, but Jones, 46, was wearing a puffy black vest. The keys to his grandmother’s house, where he currently lives, hung from a lanyard around his neck. His face was thin, a tightly cropped beard undergirding prominent cheekbones, and he had a lookout’s gaze, drifting more than darting but always alert.

 

It hadn’t been easy for Jones to transition back to a life of freedom. He managed to stick it out, he said, because he was determined not to return to the place where he spent the final eight years of his last sentence: the United States Penitentiary Administrative Maximum Facility in Florence, Colo., known more colloquially as the ADX. The ADX is the highest-security prison in the country. It was designed to be escape-proof, the Alcatraz of the Rockies, a place to incarcerate the worst, most unredeemable class of criminal — “a very small subset of the inmate population who show,” in the words of Norman Carlson, the former director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, “absolutely no concern for human life.” Ted Kaczynski and the Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph call the ADX home. The 9/11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui is held there, too, along with the 1993 World Trade Center bombing mastermind Ramzi Yousef; the Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols; the underwear bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab; and the former Bonanno crime-family boss Vincent Basciano. Michael Swango, a serial-killing doctor who may have poisoned 60 of his patients, is serving three consecutive life sentences; Larry Hoover, the Gangster Disciples kingpin made famous by rappers like Rick Ross, is serving six; the traitorous F.B.I. agent Robert Hanssen, a Soviet spy, 15.

 
...

Along with such notorious inmates, prisoners deemed serious behavioral or flight risks can also end up at the ADX — men like Jones, who in 2003, after racking up three assault charges in less than a year (all fights with other inmates) at a medium-security facility in Louisiana, found himself transferred to the same ADX cellblock as Kaczynski.

 

Inmates at the ADX spend approximately 23 hours of each day in solitary confinement. Jones had never been so isolated before. Other prisoners on his cellblock screamed and banged on their doors for hours. Jones said the staff psychiatrist stopped his prescription for Seroquel, a drug taken for bipolar disorder, telling him, “We don’t give out feel-good drugs here.” Jones experienced severe mood swings. To cope, he would work out in his cell until he was too tired to move. Sometimes he cut himself. In response, guards fastened his arms and legs to his bed with a medieval quartet of restraints, a process known as four-pointing.

 

One day in 2009, Jones was in the rec yard and spotted Michael Bacote, a friend from back home. The familiar face was welcome but also troubling. Bacote was illiterate, with an I.Q. of only 61, and suffered from acute paranoia. He had been sent to the ADX for his role as a lookout in a murder at a Texas prison, and he was not coping well. His multiple requests for transfers or psychological treatment had been denied. He was convinced that the Bureau of Prisons was trying to poison him, so he was refusing meals and medication. “You would have to be blind and crazy yourself not to see that this guy had issues,” Jones said, shaking his head. “He can barely function in a normal setting. His comprehension level was pretty much at zero.”

 

Bacote had paperwork from previous psychiatric examinations, so Jones went to the prison’s law library (a room with a computer) and looked up the address of a pro bono legal-aid group he had heard about, the D.C. Prisoners’ Project. Because Bacote couldn’t write, Jones ghosted a query. “I suppose to have a hearing before coming to the ADX,” Jones, as Bacote, wrote. “They never gave me a hearing.” He continued, “I need some help cause I have facts! Please help me.”

 

The story of the largest lawsuit ever filed against the United States Bureau of Prisons begins, improbably enough, with this letter. Deborah Golden, the director of the D.C. Prisoners’ Project, fields approximately 2,000 requests each year, but Bacote’s, which she received in October 2009, caught her eye. “I thought I might be missing something, because it was inconceivable to me that the Bureau of Prisons could be operating in such a blatantly illegal and unconstitutional manner,” she said.

 

 

More:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/29/magazine/inside-americas-toughest-federal-prison.html?_r=0

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Anyway, if people are people and a majority of folks locked up really ain't all that bad, why the high recidivism rate? Because being a convicted felon is no different than having the Mark of the Beast printed on your ****ing forehead. So you grow up in a ****ty environment, you **** up and get into some **** while you're young, locked up a few years, have a felony conviction or two on your record when you get out. Now say you've got a couple kids need taking care of or your folks are old and can't work anymore and need all the help they can get. You want to get a job. But who's hiring felons that pays a living wage? So what are you going to do? It's a big reason why our ghettos stay ghettos.

 

http://www.today.com/news/bernard-kerik-americas-legal-system-prison-felony-conviction-life-sentence-t11771

 

Bernie Kerik, the ultimate screw (no offense PK), on being a prisoner and the prison system in general.  Pretty much spot on what GACOLB says.

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