Dan T.

Some More Cops Who Need to Be Fired

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Well this is sickening...

 

Jail staff mocked a sick man as he begged for help, video shows.

Days later, he was dead.

 

From an isolation cell in the Ottawa County Jail, Terral Ellis begged for someone to help him.

 

He could not feel his legs and he could not breathe, the 26-year-old told jail staff and the on-site nurse at the Miami, Okla., facility. It felt, he said, like his back was broken and he was bleeding internally. “I think I’m dying,” he said just after 10 a.m. on Oct. 22, 2015.

 

Staff mocked him, laughed at a joke about the “boy who cried wolf,” and ignored him as he moaned. When nurse Theresa Horn arrived later that morning, she did not help either — instead threatening to chain Ellis to the ground if he continued to complain.

“I’m sick and tired of f---ing dealing with your ass!” she yelled. “Ain’t a damn thing nothing wrong with you!”

 

Hours later, Ellis was dead.

 

Video surveillance footage of Ellis’s 12 days in jail in 2015 became public for the first time last week as part of an ongoing federal lawsuit. The 18 clips taken from 16 cameras — which were edited down from the hundreds of hours of footage given to the Ellis family’s lawyers — show how jail staff repeatedly mocked Ellis and refused him adequate medical treatment.

 

On Oct. 10, 2015, Ellis took the advice of his grandfather and turned himself into the county jail on an outstanding warrant for an old DUI. On Oct. 22, he was rolled out on a paramedic’s stretcher — cold and unresponsive from septic shock.

 

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/01/29/terrall-ellis-jail-death-video/

 

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31 troopers dismissed after cheating on exam during training academy

 

ATLANTA — The Georgia Department of Public Safety has fired a whole class of 31 Georgia State Patrol troopers after it said it found widespread cheating on part of the entrance exam.

 

Channel 2 investigative reporter Aaron Diamant broke the news Wednesday morning after he confirmed the “sweeping" disciplinary action involving a training academy class in 2019.

 

Click on the link for the full article

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  1. What kind of nurse can't tell if a patient has pneumonia or not? I don't have any medical background, and I know you need to use a stetscope and listen for fluid in the lungs.  That whole situation could've been avoided if the staff there weren't inhuman ****s, and the first EMS who arrived on the scene actually took him to the hospital after the first seizure. 

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Things won't change until the public comes around to the idea that lawsuits and cash awards are not justice.  What those people did to that man in jail, and lets remember that he's hardly the first, was abhorrent.  The fact that they can argue, as a defense, that it wasn't "deliberate" is disgusting.  Inmates can't make any health care decisions for themselves.  they can only beg for help.  A standard of deliberate intent is entirely unreasonable in these situations.  If the current laws do not count what those sadistic pieces of **** did as criminal, the laws are wrong and need to be changed. 

 

I hope everyone shown on video gleefully taking part on that man's death are ruined personally and professionally.  They deserve worse. 

 

Would have been nice if these articles included a picture of Nurse Theresa Horn.  Consider it a public service, because I sincerely doubt anyone would want to rely on her for their medical care at this point. 

 

 

2 hours ago, Gamebreaker said:
  1. What kind of nurse can't tell if a patient has pneumonia or not? I don't have any medical background, and I know you need to use a stetscope and listen for fluid in the lungs.  That whole situation could've been avoided if the staff there weren't inhuman ****s, and the first EMS who arrived on the scene actually took him to the hospital after the first seizure. 

When people are dehumanized people jump to conclusions that they are lying.  The worst examples happen in prisons, but you can also see racism and classism intersect with healthcare out in the free world too.  

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Affidavit says Warren, OH officer made up story about robbery, alleged shootout


According to the documents, Linnen told investigators that he took his back up gun and fired two rounds towards himself as if he was seated in the car. One of the rounds grazed his shoulder, tearing his jacket but not wounding him.

......he further described the suspect as a black male that was six feet tall in his 30's with a thin build. He said the suspect was wearing a black hoodie with the hood up and had a gray t-shirt pulled up over the lower half of his face like a mask. He also described the suspect as having a high pitched voice and carried a silver revolver with a black handle....

 

Investigators say in the document that Linnen's false statements were calculated to mislead investigators and led to innocent people being detained by police.

 

https://www.wfmj.com/story/41596590/affidavit-says-warren-officer-made-up-story-about-robbery-alleged-shootout

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Judge Finds That the Houston Narcotics Officer Whose Lies Killed a Couple in 2019 Framed Another Suspect in 2008

 

When Houston narcotics officer Gerald Goines arrested Otis Mallet in 2008, he described a crack cocaine purchase in which Mallet retrieved the drug from a can inside a truck and handed it to his brother, Steven, whom Goines had paid $200. Thanks to Goines' testimony, Mallet was sentenced to eight years in prison. But today, the Houston Chronicle reports, Harris County prosecutors joined Mallet's lawyers in urging a judge to declare him "actually innocent" because Goines "repeatedly lied about nearly every aspect" of the case. The judge agreed.

 

The handling of Mallet's case seems to be in character for Goines, who wrote the fraudulent search warrant affidavit for the January 2019 drug raid that killed a middle-aged couple, Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas, in their home on Harding Street. To justify the Harding Street raid, which resulted in state murder charges and federal civil rights charges against Goines, the officer invented a heroin purchase by a nonexistent confidential informant. His story about Mallet's involvement in the 2008 crack deal appears to have been equally fictitious.

 

"Now we know [Goines] was lying and using the district attorney's office as a tool to convict people wrongfully as early as 2008," said Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg, whose office is reviewing some 14,000 cases involving Goines and other members of the Houston Police Department's Narcotics Division. 

 

Click on the link for the full article

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On 1/30/2020 at 5:13 PM, Gamebreaker said:
  1. What kind of nurse can't tell if a patient has pneumonia or not? I don't have any medical background, and I know you need to use a stetscope and listen for fluid in the lungs.  That whole situation could've been avoided if the staff there weren't inhuman ****s, and the first EMS who arrived on the scene actually took him to the hospital after the first seizure. 

And what kind of nursing licensure board would allow her to keep her nursing license? I checked and there is a Theresa Horn still licensed there. I think I’m going to file a complaint tomorrow.

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On 2/3/2020 at 10:33 PM, The Sisko said:

And what kind of nursing licensure board would allow her to keep her nursing license? I checked and there is a Theresa Horn still licensed there. I think I’m going to file a complaint tomorrow.

 

 

There's a change.org petition to bring her before the Oklahoma Board of Nursing and have her license revoked:

 

https://www.change.org/p/oklahoma-governor-bring-nurse-theresa-horn-before-the-oklahoma-board-of-nursing?original_footer_petition_id=13551809&algorithm=promoted&source_location=petition_footer&grid_position=8&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAB0GNAEAAAAAXjdtxyIQcgI3ZTE5ZmVlOA%3D%3D

Edited by Dan T.

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27 minutes ago, Cooked Crack said:

Ain't this some ****. What other job can you do this and still keep your job and not be charged.

 

Congressman. 

 

But that doesnt make it any better lol. Damn this country is so ****ed from the top down its almost funny. I say almost cause this guy gets to get a gun back so who knows what happens next time he gets wasted and wants to go driving maybe in uniform. Who the **** knows!

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2 hours ago, Cooked Crack said:

Imagine thinking an all-time low in the use of force is a bad thing

 

. . . because of fear that witnesses might actually be able to back up what they saw.  

 

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8 hours ago, Cooked Crack said:
Imagine thinking an all-time low in the use of force is a bad thing

I know. So tragic for them.

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Probably won't be long until any cell phone recordings of police interactions are going to be illegal 

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Kid ends up getting expelled. 

 

Cop and Lady say hes uses profanity, that he left without permission and that he used racist words so he got suspended. Kid drops a friend off at school later in the week after mother calls and tell them he had permission. They expel him.  

 

Video footage of him using profanity, and racist words and also being threatened to be shoot by the cop. 

 

 

 

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Mother of 5 dies after 4 days of solitary confinement at SCORE (GRAPHIC WARNING)

 

DES MOINES, Wash. — [GRAPHIC WARNING: The video above may be disturbing to some viewers. It was shared by the family of Damaris Rodriguez because they say they don’t want the same treatment to happen to others.]

 

Damaris Rodriguez died while behind bars at the SCORE jail, even though every moment of her four-day decline was captured on surveillance video.

 

The 43-year-old old mother of five was booked into the South Correctional Entity Jail in Des Moines on Dec. 30, 2017 after "she suffered from a mental health episode,” according to the federal complaint her family filed in the United States District Court of Western Washington.


Rodriguez’s husband, Rey, recently spoke to KIRO 7 through an interpreter and said he called 911 that day “to get an ambulance, but instead the police arrived.”

 

“I told them, she doesn’t need to go to jail. She needs to go to a hospital,” the SeaTac man said.

 

During discovery, the family's attorney received surveillance video from SCORE that shows a listless Rodriguez being carried into jail, apparently in handcuffs, on that late December afternoon. Multiple camera angles, show her being dragged into a booking cell and left there, lying face down.

 

Approximately 20 minutes later, Rodriguez is seen on surveillance being moved into another cell, where she then wanders in circles. By the next day - according to the time-stamped video - Rodriguez was naked, crawling and apparently vomiting.

 

“Almost every second that she was in jail was captured on video, and I think the only way to describe that video is as a window into hell,” Nate Bingham, of Krutch Lindell Bingham Jones P.S. attorneys in Seattle, told KIRO 7.

 

Rodriguez “was sick, she was hallucinating and she was dying,” according to Bingham, who said no one knows Rodriguez’s exact time of death. According to the surveillance video, it appears she died sometime late on the night of Jan. 3 or early Jan. 4, 2018.

 

“After she stopped breathing, it was awhile before anyone even noticed her,” Bingham said.

 

Bingham represents Rodriguez’s widower and five children. He shared the SCORE surveillance video with KIRO 7 that he believes shows, according to the lawsuit, that Rodriguez spent "four days alone in a cell, naked, surrounded by her own urine and vomit," "fighting both mentally and physically against her own hallucinations."

 

Despite being booked into jail, Rodriguez "was never arraigned for -- let alone convicted of -- a crime. She was never even taken to court" according to the family’s complaint.

Federal law demands an inmate be charged with a crime - or released - within 72 hours after arrest.

 

Rodriguez remained behind bars for more than 106 hours, according to the timestamp on the surveillance video.

 

“She was never taken in front of a judge,” Bingham said. “Damaris spent the next four days descending into insanity, becoming sicker and sicker and eventually her body shut down and she died.”

 

Click on the link for the full article and video

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On 2/12/2020 at 9:10 PM, China said:

Despite being booked into jail, Rodriguez "was never arraigned for -- let alone convicted of -- a crime. She was never even taken to court" according to the family’s complaint.

Federal law demands an inmate be charged with a crime - or released - within 72 hours after arrest.

 

Rodriguez remained behind bars for more than 106 hours, according to the timestamp on the surveillance video.

 

“She was never taken in front of a judge,” Bingham said. “Damaris spent the next four days descending into insanity, becoming sicker and sicker and eventually her body shut down and she died.”

She wasn’t a “job creator” so this is OK.

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California Auditor Slams License Plate Readers

 

California State Auditor Elaine M. Howle is not impressed with the way local law enforcement agencies are spying on innocent motorists with automated license plate readers (ALPR, also known as ANPR in Europe).

 

"Technology gives governments the ability to accumulate volumes of information about people, raising a reasonable question: How is an individual's privacy to be preserved?" Howle asked. "Instead of ensuring that only authorized users access ALPR data for appropriate purposes, the agencies have left their systems open to abuse by neglecting to institute sufficient oversight. Over the years, the media has reported that some individuals within law enforcement used or could use data systems -- and sometimes ALPR systems -- to obtain information about individuals for their personal use, including to locate places they regularly visit, to determine their acquaintances, and to blackmail them based on this information."

 

Click on the link for the full article

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