steve09ru

The Grilling and Cooking Thread

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I guess mopping is what I'm talking about.

Also, there's no water/apple cider vinegar in my grill. Didn't see that in the instructions or recipe. Is that something you do/don't/can use when smoking with a kamado?

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I guess mopping is what I'm talking about.

Also, there's no water/apple cider vinegar in my grill. Didn't see that in the instructions or recipe. Is that something you do/don't/can use when smoking with a kamado?

 

Not sure about how things work on a kamado, but in my weber kettle, you can bank the coals to one side of the grill.  Place a water pan directly above the coals and another one (optional) underneath the grate beside the coals (indirect side) and place the meat on the indirect side.  

 

 

Edit:  Just did some research and read that kamado's are designed to not need a water pan.  But you can use one if you want to.

Edited by Dont Taze Me Bro
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That, in a nutshell, is the problem I'm having. Lots of ways to do it and because this is my first time I have no idea which way to try.

I suppose I'll just have to experiment :)

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That, in a nutshell, is the problem I'm having. Lots of ways to do it and because this is my first time I have no idea which way to try.

I suppose I'll just have to experiment :)

Simple is I've found to be the best. Don't mop you have to open the grill to much. Some people like to foil with a little juice after the smoking phase. Makes things go a little faster but can make the bark or finish a little soggy. Temp control and removal at right temp are the most important things. Edited by HOF44
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So I got my kamado ready this week and decided at 10pm last night I was going to smoke this pork shoulder.

Still rolling. Seems stuck in the 150-160 range but everything I've read says that's fine and just leave it be.

Once it's done I'll post my epic failure battling temperature control.

Anyways, I believe I've read something about using something like Apple cider to moist things when you're smoking. Should I be doing this? Is it for certain types of meat, or certain affects? I'm a bit confused

 

I never bother, except for when I do 3-2-1 ribs, (Google it).

 

IMHO, there's no need to baste anything.  All you accomplish is extending the cook caused by the heat that escapes when you open the lid.

 

Stuck in the 150-160 range is normal.  You're in the stall.   It can stay that way for a few hours.  The temp might even go down a little, as the moisture evaporates on the meat and causes it to cool a bit.   Be patient, and you'll muscle through it.   It's not unheard of to have a second stall, at around 180 degrees, or so.   This happens to me sometimes, but it doesn't last too long.

 

How big is the shoulder?

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That, in a nutshell, is the problem I'm having. Lots of ways to do it and because this is my first time I have no idea which way to try.

I suppose I'll just have to experiment :)

 

Pork shoulder is probably the easiest meat to cook on the Kamado. Season it before you put it on the grill, get the temp to about 250 with your wood of choice (I like apple or cherry), put the shoulder on the grill with the thermometer in the meat,  & LEAVE IT ALONE!

 

You'll hit a stall at about 160 where it will seem like it's stuck there forever. I was just reading earlier today the possible cause: the water in the meat is working it's way out of the meat and evaporating making the meat cooler on the outside. Seems to make sense, but whatever the reason, it will always stall around that temp. 

 

Simple is I've found to be the best. Don't mop you have to open the grill to much. Some people like to foil with a little juice after the smoking phase. Makes things go a little faster but can make the bark or finish a little soggy. Temp control and removal at right temp are the most important things.

 

Spot on. 

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I guess mopping is what I'm talking about.

Also, there's no water/apple cider vinegar in my grill. Didn't see that in the instructions or recipe. Is that something you do/don't/can use when smoking with a kamado?

Don't mop.   

 

It's a waste of time and all it accomplishes is extending the cooking time by cooling off the meat and helping to prevent the formation of a good bark.

 

That's just my opinion.  

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If you want to try something try injection. I have not done it, but you see it in a lot of competition cooks. Pez also does it with his Mojo sauce when he cooks a whole pig. I might try it one day just to see what I think.

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How big is the shoulder?

7 lbs.

And yeah I had another stall in the 180's.

Just had a sandwich with it. It's good, for my cooking standards. Which are low :)

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7 lbs.

And yeah I had another stall in the 180's.

Just had a sandwich with it. It's good, for my cooking standards. Which are low :)

Congrats! Glad it worked out.

I try to keep them around the 4-5lb size.

If I'm feeding a crowd, I'll do a couple of them. Twice the delicious bark.

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If you want to try something try injection. I have not done it, but you see it in a lot of competition cooks. Pez also does it with his Mojo sauce when he cooks a whole pig. I might try it one day just to see what I think.

I prefer dry brining, but I do inject when I smoke briskets and pit beef. With all the connective tissue and fat in shoulders, there's no need.

I used to inject chicken and turkey, but now I don't bother, as dry brining is much easier and the results are always great.

Word of caution: if you dry brine, do not use a rub with salt, and make sure that the meat you're brining does not have salt in it already

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I prefer dry brining, but I do inject when I smoke briskets and pit beef. With all the connective tissue and fat in shoulders, there's no need.

I used to inject chicken and turkey, but now I don't bother, as dry brining is much easier and the results are always great.

Word of caution: if you dry brine, do not use a rub with salt, and make sure that the meat you're brining does not have salt in it already

 

Yeah, this is pretty much what I do. For poultry, I only buy local organic chicken & turkey (except Costco wings & thighs). The price per pound is higher but the meat is so freaking much better. The first time I smoked a turkey (for Thanksgiving) the amount of fat that dropped into the pan underneath on the smoker was about 2 TSP. It was the most tender, juicy turkey we've had in 30 years. Didn't brine or inject it. Just incredibly juicy & tasty. 

 

If you're into it, Polyface Farms has a club you can join (for free). They deliver all over the DMV. It's not cheap but the meat is way better than any of the grocery store meat. Don't get me wrong, I still buy meat from stores. But I typically buy the top grade at Costco. Not organic, but top USDA meat. 

 

We're not huge red meat eaters so we buy steaks once every 3 months, maybe. Lots of pork, chicken, fish & shrimp. 

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Tried out those bourbon slushies that Skinsfan1311 posted a while back.  I brought them to a card game with some friends and they went over very well.  Delicious and potent without being dangerous.

 

Glad you liked them.   If you're feeling "dangerous", float a little bourbon on top. :)

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I prefer dry brining, but I do inject when I smoke briskets and pit beef. With all the connective tissue and fat in shoulders, there's no need.

I used to inject chicken and turkey, but now I don't bother, as dry brining is much easier and the results are always great.

Word of caution: if you dry brine, do not use a rub with salt, and make sure that the meat you're brining does not have salt in it already

Brine is, by definition, water infused with salt.  If it doesn't include water or salt, it should be called something else.  Is it different from a dry rub?

 

/nitpickery

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Brine is, by definition, water infused with salt.  If it doesn't include water or salt, it should be called something else.  Is it different from a dry rub?

 

/nitpickery

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Delicious and potent without being dangerous.

Dangerous ?? What's this dangerous you speak of???

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Brine is, by definition, water infused with salt. If it doesn't include water or salt, it should be called something else. Is it different from a dry rub?

/nitpickery

Dry brining contains both elements, salt & water.

I dry brine with kosher salt. The meat provides all the water that's needed. I use around.~1/2 tsp per lb.

The salt draws the water out and, by osmosis, the water and salt solution is pulled back into the meat.

I don't know all the science behind it, but it workes. Something about affect that the salt has on protein cells.

Here's a great article on it.

http://amazingribs.com/recipes/rubs_pastes_marinades_and_brines/dry_brining.html

Edited by Skinsfan1311
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I want to do some chicken quarters with the Slow N Sear. Any suggestions on rub, glaze, temp, duration etc?

Oil,salt, pepper and cook it according to the "hot and fast" directions on the ABC website.

Cook to temp, which is usually ~ 1hr. Chicken is safe at 165, but dark meat tastes much better at 180. It'a very forgiving and doesn't dry out.

At the end, if desired, use your favorite BBQ sauce and finish over the hot coals. Keep a close eye on it, at that point, because the sauce will burn quickly.

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I got into it so I could feed myself decent food before I started dating my wife.  But then it became abundantly clear I was going to be the cook for the family, 'cause she can't cook, with the exception of pancakes and a couple of baked items.

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I'm lucky. My GF, my sisters, my mother, and my GF's mother are all good cooks. I hold my own though.

It's nice being in a family full of good cooks because family gatherings are great and you can make cooking dinners a team effort.

They cook much lighter and healthier food than I do. I suppose I became interested in cooking because I want to eat fattening dude food.

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I do most of the cooking, because I love to cook. I can't,(won't), bake for ahit.

My wife is a good cook. Her forte' is baked goods and salads.

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