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Reuters: CIA tortured, misled, U.S. report finds, drawing calls for action


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49 percent said such tactics are sometimes justified — a number that has increased in recent years, the outlet said — and 57 percent said they believe it leads to information to prevent terrorist attacks.

 

 

. . . . despite being shown that, at least as of a few years ago, we we're something like 0-127 in that department. 

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Americans Largely Back C.I.A. on Interrogations, Polls Find

 

Americans, on balance, think the C.I.A. was justified in its aggressive interrogation of terrorism suspects after the Sept. 11 attacks, according to three national polls conducted in the wake of the release last week of a report by the Senate Intelligence Committee.

 

The polls, conducted by CBS News, the Pew Research Center and ABC News/Washington Post, also found agreement among most Americans that the interrogation and detention techniques were successful in gaining information from terrorism suspects. The Senate report reached the opposite conclusion.

 

Deep partisan divides were seen in all three polls on the issue of whether torture was justified, with strong majorities of Republicans and fewer than half of Democrats saying it was. The wording of the questions varied slightly between the polls, producing somewhat different results. The CBS News question, which referred to waterboarding, found fewer Americans saying the methods were justified.

 

CBS News also asked about several of the specific interrogation methods that were detailed in the Senate report, including waterboarding, sleep deprivation and threats against family members. Majorities of Americans across party lines agree that each is a form of torture.

 

All three polls were conducted Dec. 11-14 and have margins of sampling error ranging from plus or minus 3 to 4 percentage points.

http://www.nytimes.com/politics/first-draft/2014/12/16/?entry=7134

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Seems like it.  Of course I would add that the truth is not something that can be determined democratically.

I suspect most people think about the issue on a purely emotional level.  They're the bad guys and so they deserve what's coming to them especially if there's a chance that it can help us.  It's cartoon level thinking. And not anime, but Hanah Barbera

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If we torture somebody, and we extract information which provides a second source for something we've heard before, then does that justify the torture? Does that go in the "W" column?

 

It depends on the information and where it leads to.

 

Some people are making the entire situation as simple as they can because it makes their arguments stronger. The problem is it's not that simple, so their arguments don't work.

 

It's one thing to take a moral stand on it or to even judge others for their differing morals. It's entirely different to start talking about the details of the report the way many are.

 

There's an incredibly lack of context and, frankly, accurate reporting of what's in the report.

There are people that think there was 0 information obtained from this (lol @ 0-127 joke larry :) ) but that's not what the report says. The sad part is I can't tell if that's because people haven't bothered to read the report, or if they're intentionally being dense.

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WASHINGTON — A panel investigating the Central Intelligence Agency’s search of a computer network used by staff members of the Senate Intelligence Committee who were looking into the C.I.A.’s use of torture will recommend against punishing anyone involved in the episode, according to current and former government officials.

 

The panel will make that recommendation after the five C.I.A. officials who were singled out by the agency’s inspector general this year for improperly ordering and carrying out the computer searches staunchly defended their actions, saying that they were lawful and in some cases done at the behest of John O. Brennan, the C.I.A. director.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/20/us/politics/panel-to-advise-against-penalty-for-cia-computer-search.html?_r=0

 

So the fact that congress was spied on because the director knew about it and asked them to makes it ok... as opposed to, you know, making it so much worse.  This is like the government version of "too big to fail".  They can't very well punish the director of the CIA so let's just let this amazing bit of law breaking slide. 

 

(BTW - this is known as corruption when other countries do it.  We laugh and laugh and say thank God ours is not like that.)

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/20/us/politics/panel-to-advise-against-penalty-for-cia-computer-search.html?_r=0

 

So the fact that congress was spied on because the director knew about it and asked them to makes it ok... as opposed to, you know, making it so much worse.  This is like the government version of "too big to fail".  They can't very well punish the director of the CIA so let's just let this amazing bit of law breaking slide. 

 

(BTW - this is known as corruption when other countries do it.  We laugh and laugh and say thank God ours is not like that.)

 

 

What's more, when Brennan was first asked he said:

 

“As far as the allegations of, you know, CIA hacking into, you know, Senate computers, nothing could be further from the truth. I mean, we wouldn’t do that. I mean, that’s _ that’s just beyond the _ you know, the scope of reason in terms of what we would do,” he said in an appearance at the Council on Foreign Relations."

 

I guess if you think it's OK to hack into the Senate computers, lying about it is OK too.

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