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Chalk Talk: The Redskins Outside Zone Scheme


KDawg

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As Chris Foerster returns to coach the offensive line, we are going to be entering year five with a similar running game. Having had the honor to see a clinic with Foerster prior to this season, I got to learn and understand some of what the team is doing.

 

I should start with this tidbit:

 

There are really two versions of the "stretch" play that people hear about all the time. The first is a C-Gap entry point. The C-Gap, for those who aren't football nerds, is the space between the tackle and tight end, or the space next to the tackle if there is no tight end. With this style of stretch, the handoff isn't taken as wide, and the offensive line needs to be a bit slower in their approach to their target.

 

The other version, and the version that the 'Skins utilize is a wide outside zone. The wide zone has a much wider handoff point for the back and the entry point is ideally outside of the tight end. That means your offensive linemen can literally run to their targets.

 

It make sense that we'd run the wider version, if you stop and think about it. Our offensive line up until this point isn't exactly made of giants that can manhandle you with physical strength. Lichtensteiger is about 284 pounds. But what all of our offensive linemen can do is run. And if the OL runs, who else has to run? If you guessed the defense in it's entirety, you'd be correct.

 

Because of our ability to move, it makes defeating the DL that much easier. Typically, it neutralizes a bit of their athleticism, as their gap moves. And if they are running to protect their gap and our back can't get to the edge, guess where he has a better chance of hitting? Inside, where the defense just ran away from.

 

The back's job is to press the heels of the OL. That means he wants to stay on his track and get to the line of scrimmage before making a decision. Why? Simply because that allows the OL to set their blocks up and the back's move allows him to get into open field.

 

The OL and the back should be on a similar angle in their tracks.

 

An offensive lineman's goal, specifically in our scheme, is to reach the man he's responsible for. His landmark, if he doesn't have backside help in a combination is the outside number of the defender. If he doesn't have back-side help (tail protector from now on), then he can't risk getting any wider. That defensive lineman is his man, and over setting on him will allow him to play behind the block and make a play in the backfield. The goal always has to be to keep your hat between the defender and the ball (hat means helmet) as an offensive lineman. So setting the landmark at the outside number will help cut off any penetration on a spike (spike is when a DL crosses your face to a gap inside you, to make it simple).

 

If you have a tail protector, though, it means you're in combination with another offensive lineman. The OL will set their landmark with their first step. Meaning wherever their landmark is based on the defensive player's alignment, their first step will put them on that angle to get there. They must then get their second step into the ground and accelerate into contact. With the tail protector, the covered lineman's landmark is the outside arm pit of the defender. If you noticed, that landmark changed from when he didn't have a tail protector. It's wider. He has help inside of him, so he doesn't have to protect against the spike. The covered OL takes his backside shoulder and hand and attacks that outside armpit. The tail protector is looking to get outside leverage on the same defender, so that he's in position to take over the block. Remember, the premise of a combination is to take care of the first level first (which is the defensive line), but it's also so that you have the ability to pick up the second level (linebackers). If the LB comes over the top, the covered OL, due to his wide landmark, is in position to pick him up and seal him. If he tries to run through inside, the tail protector will come off the combo and step into the linebacker, and thus allow the covered OL to remain on the block on the defensive lineman.

 

The outside zone play is typically a 3-step play. Meaning the offensive line MUST know what they're doing after the third step. So for instance, for a tail protector. If by your third step you know you aren't going to be able to get to the down lineman because he's running too fast, you have two options. If you have some "junk" (term meaning part of the DL's body is in striking range. Not enough to be able to get to your landmark, but enough to get your hands on him) you can "snap" him into the covered player. Basically, you get lateral and give him a hard shove (you see a lot of pancakes when that happens, because the DL isn't expecting it). After that, you seal whatever backer you're in combination for. The other option is if there isn't any "junk" hanging behind. If that's the case, you turn up to the second level because there is nothing to do otherwise. But, as Foerster notes, lineman rarely count, and when he counts their steps on film it seems to be "five" steps before they are in proper position. And that's okay. But if they take seven steps on film, he'll coach them up and let them know they spent too much time figuring out who their assignment was.

 

Foerster doesn't want his offensive linemen square on outside zone plays. It's something that they did a little bit of in his first year on staff, and if you watch Trent Williams he sometimes has a bad habit of getting square. They wanted to allow the back to cut either way, but what that wound up doing was allowing the defense to rally a bit. The Redskins want lateral movement. If the DL is moving laterally, it allows smaller offensive lineman to move them backward due to their momentum.

 

On the backside, the OL really has two options. They can cut or they can take their man. Against a defense that is quick penetrating that doesn't sit and read, you'd want to cut. You won't have enough time to get yourself in good position. Against a defense that reads and reacts, you'll be able to get good helmet placement and get yourself in a position you can make a block.

 

The edge defender especially can be taken care of in a few ways. If our tackle can get to their landmark (outside # or arm pit) then they get there. But if that defender crosses the "T" (A term to mean if they cross the initial step of the OL [meaning they penetrate too quickly]) the offensive lineman has the ability to "knock them out" to the sideline. The running back will see that and cut inside after pressing the heels.

 

A note on 3-4 defenses. One of the premises of the 3-4 is to have the OLB set the edge on the defense. Those OLBs are generally strong and athletic, so they require a bit more attention. What the 'Skins have done in the past is double that guy with two tight ends, or a tight end and a fullback, or whatever combination they can. If they can get that guy covered up and the rest of the OL can cut off the linebackers and backside pursuit, it puts the back one on one with a corner or a safety rotating down into the box.

 

There is a misconception that the zone scheme is based upon finesse. And in our case, it's more finesse than on other teams, especially due to the size of our OL. But, the goal is still to displace the defensive line both horizontally and vertically. A good combination block will move the defensive line off the line of scrimmage and give the back something to read.

 

There's obviously a LOT more to the techniques and fundamentals, but this is a very basic overview of how we run the outside zone.

 

 

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Great stuff as always KDawg, I love reading these. One thing though, how do the O-Linemen actually identify their landmark to start with, considering all the different defensive formations, shifts and stunts?

If they are covered they have that man. Their landmark is the outside number or the outside arm pit of that man. Covered means they have a man aligned on them. If the OL next to 'em doesn't have anyone covering them they're in combination with the covered man.

If in combination, the covered guy takes armpit landmark, tail protector takes outside leverage, working for the far breastplate. If they are solo and not in combination, the landmark is the outside #.

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If they are covered they have that man. Their landmark is the outside number or the outside # of that man. Covered means they have a man aligned on them. If the OL next to 'em doesn't have anyone covering them they're in combination with the covered man.

 

I LOVE the ZBS!  It's so much easier to teach and to adjust to whatever you see defensively.  Last year we implemented a simple set of rules we got from the Nike Clinic where the Pistol Spread Option guys were lecturing.  Their website is http://pistolspreadoption.com/

 

Their rules are easy enough for youth to keep up with.

 

Covered means you can reach out and touch someone on the playside.  So, if you're covered then you block the outside jersey number of that player.  If not, then you step to the playside gap (checking for a twist or stunt coming your way) and look for the first Down lineman (they say fat guy), and then help out if necessary to the next level. 

 

When you keep it simple you can have a better chance of success.  The more you make a player think the slower he plays.  We give them a hint on where the play is designed by the play call in the huddle.  Right inside would be Rick and Right outside would be Rocky.  Left inside is Liam and Left outside is Lonnie.  Guys names are run and girls names are pass.  We use Sarah for slide Right and Sally for slide left.  That way the QB can reset protection if he sees an over load coming pre-snap. 

 

Also, this allows the players to think for themselves.  You can't possibly draw up every possible scheme the defense will throw at you.  They have to be able to improvise.  So letting them know where we want to go allows them to work in tandem with their buddy and get the job done.  We do a lot of meat grinder drills to help them figure out what they might see coming and learn how to counter anything the defense throws at them. 

 

Remember, ZBS is about covering people up so the running back can make his cut.  You don't have to physically man handle the defensive lineman.  Just get in his way; we like to say obstruct him!  We drill our backs to read the blocking and they have three choices; which are universal to ZBS; and these are in order of how we want them to make a decision.

 

1.  Bang it - As they're pressing the heels of their landmark if they see an opening then just smash into the hole.

2.  Bend it - The cut back is where you get your big plays as defenders leave their gap to rush to the point of attack.

3.  Bounce it - The last thing you want to do is have your back bounce it to the outside but if they've covered up the other two then you have no choice. 

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 Remember, ZBS is about covering people up so the running back can make his cut.  You don't have to physically man handle the defensive lineman.  Just get in his way; we like to say obstruct him!  We drill our backs to read the blocking and they have three choices; which are universal to ZBS; and these are in order of how we want them to make a decision.

 

 

But in covering people up, it's about moving them off the line of scrimmage. It's part of the reason you want the back pressing the heels of the OL. If the OL gets movement, the back doesn't have to cut as early as he might if the OL is stalemated.

 

I agree though, that the idea is getting in between the defender and the ball. But the goal is movement at the first level. Art Kehoe, Miami's OL Coach for lord knows how long, doesn't even teach his guys to come off on the backer. He says it happens naturally if the OL does it's job. They should be, when in combination, driving the DL so far back that the LB can't make a play. (I think he exaggerates that he doesn't teach it. But his point is that he doesn't want them coming off of the first level block too early. I mean, I've seen that happen very often. A guy comes off too early, the tail protector isn't in position and the DL splits them and makes a play in the backfield). Kehoe's point is that if you do your job you don't have to come off the block at all until you get to the backer.

 

1.  Bang it - As they're pressing the heels of their landmark if they see an opening then just smash into the hole.

2.  Bend it - The cut back is where you get your big plays as defenders leave their gap to rush to the point of attack.

3.  Bounce it - The last thing you want to do is have your back bounce it to the outside but if they've covered up the other two then you have no choice. 

 

Good overall rules. I also prefer teaching them these phrases (you may want to change wording for the youth kids).

 

Inside Zone = Hole to Cutback play

Outside Zone = Hole to bounce play.

 

In the Skins case, they run a wide zone, but it's technically to the "9" hole. It should hit at the numbers. There's your original "hole". But if you can't get outside, your hole is further inside. First read is the force player. If he gets covered up, you're headed to the numbers. If he doesn't get covered up, you're going inside.

 

If you have a chance to go to the numbers, you may have to "bounce" it to the sideline, but the goal is to hit it up the numbers.

 

I do like your rules though. Simple and easy to learn, especially for youth. Well done Coach.

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If they are covered they have that man. Their landmark is the outside number or the outside arm pit of that man. Covered means they have a man aligned on them. If the OL next to 'em doesn't have anyone covering them they're in combination with the covered man.

 

 

Covered means you can reach out and touch someone on the playside.  So, if you're covered then you block the outside jersey number of that player.  If not, then you step to the playside gap (checking for a twist or stunt coming your way) and look for the first Down lineman (they say fat guy), and then help out if necessary to the next level. 

 

Thanks guys. The more I learn, the more I realise I don't know.  :(

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K it seems like teams that use the ZBS have a lot of success running the ball, but not so much passing the ball. I think of us and Houston. Is that because of the smallish OL or because we just can't pass the ball?

Multiple reasons.  A smallish OL has little to do with the inability to pass.  In my personal experience and what I've read from others, successful pass pro takes the greatest amount of athleticism.  ZBS teams do seem to need the other team to respect the run to pass well.

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K it seems like teams that use the ZBS have a lot of success running the ball, but not so much passing the ball. I think of us and Houston. Is that because of the smallish OL or because we just can't pass the ball?

 

The smallish OL is a misconception that Redskin fans have towards the zone blocking scheme. The zone scheme doesn't require small linemen. It requires linemen that can move. Notice I didn't say, "athletic" linemen. Tyler Polumbus can move fairly well, but I'm not sure anyone has ever really called him athletic. He's lanky and long and doesn't have great agility, but he can get to a landmark.

 

The majority of teams in the NFL run some form of zone scheme. The Ravens have Marshall Yanda (6-3, 315), Michael Oher (6-4, 315), Eugene Monroe (6-3, 306), Gino Gradkowski (6-3, 300) and AQ Shipley (6-1, 309). In contrast, our OL is only really small because Lichtensteiger is 284. Now, in comparison, the Atlanta Falcons run some zone stuff, and they have Lamar Holmes (6-6, 333), Justin Blalock (6-4, 326), Joe Hawley (6-3, 302), Peter Konz (6-5, 317), and Jeremy Trueblood (6-8, 320). As you can see, just by these two teams there is a range of guys that can play in the zone scheme. The zone scheme doesn't require smaller linemen. It requires guys that can move. Now, not everyone is as zone oriented as the Redskins, either. And that is, in part, due to the size of our linemen.

 

The problem with a smaller OL is pass protection (though, that's not necessarily because the OL is "small"). You can have smaller guys that have the strength of a thousand ox, but we don't have that. Lichtensteiger isn't all that strong, relatively speaking. Chester is aging quickly and losing a lot of his strength base. Polumbus is too lanky and doesn't move all that well in pass protection. That's more of the problem than having small guys. Our small guys are also either aging, not all that strong (relatively speaking) or too lanky. Conversely, we could have guys that are mammoths that can't move and get beat in pass pro, too. The key to any offensive line isn't so much size. It's athleticism, raw strength (which includes leverage) and technique.

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The problem with a smaller OL is pass protection (though, that's not necessarily because the OL is "small"). You can have smaller guys that have the strength of a thousand ox, but we don't have that. Lichtensteiger isn't all that strong, relatively speaking. Chester is aging quickly and losing a lot of his strength base. Polumbus is too lanky and doesn't move all that well in pass protection. That's more of the problem than having small guys. Our small guys are also either aging, not all that strong (relatively speaking) or too lanky. Conversely, we could have guys that are mammoths that can't move and get beat in pass pro, too. The key to any offensive line isn't so much size. It's athleticism, raw strength (which includes leverage) and technique.

 

OUSTANDING OP, bro.  We need more of these this time of year.

 

I think our O-line could've been a better pass blocking line (per se) if we'd have moved the pocket.  At times it was almost like we had two or more different philosophies we were asking them to undertake.  Wouldn't be a huge deal if they complimented each other.  I think the Denver Shanny system a lot of the boot action really helped with the pass blocking.  So in effect, your o-line is run blocking for a pass play and if they are good at run blocking, they are good at pass blocking.  And if you were a good play caller, you could get that defense so used to flowing that they were caught off guard with a 3 or 5 step call.  We didn't have that here.

 

Who do you see as some members of the offensive line that need to be upgraded, especially knowing that Jay wants to run more than just the ZBS with our new offense?  I know we ran some power with Foerster (back to back against the Cowboys on one TD drive, even) but who are some guys that probably won't fit the bill to do both?

 

And is this a good situation (in your opinion) for LeRibeus if he can get his act together in the offseason since he was rated as one of the two best pulling Guards in his draft class?

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OUSTANDING OP, bro.  We need more of these this time of year.

 

 

Thanks brother.

 

I think our O-line could've been a better pass blocking line (per se) if we'd have moved the pocket.  At times it was almost like we had two or more different philosophies we were asking them to undertake.  Wouldn't be a huge deal if they complimented each other.

 

I'm big on continuity within scheme. When I was a younger coach, I didn't understand the importance. As I get older and see the effects of continuity, I become more in favor of it. Before I left the HS position for college this past year, I designed a run/pass offense that our head coach was going to implement. He told me the main component he wanted, the power play. I based our run scheme and pass protections (he would draw up routes, I'd have say in QB's landmark/protection stuff) on keeping things coordinated.

 

Power is a gap scheme, so we also included other gap scheme plays. Split-Flow counter, Full-flow counter and Power were our gap scheme plays. Playside they were blocked EXACTLY the same (depending on the front, but the rules were the same). If our OL could learn the difference and the why, we could easily run all three plays. Next I installed a simple outside zone play. With the combos, it would possibly make the LBs freeze as our bread and butter was power, and when executed correctly a stretch play to the C-Gap (inside leg of TE) can look a lot like power. And then, I thought about pass protection. We were BEST at man scheme stuff in pass pro, so I installed a few man scheme run plays like your typical iso.

 

We then installed playactions off of each of these, which were blocked just like their run counterparts.

 

All the while, I was working on pass pro techniques, but never told the guys anything about the scheme. They knew alignments, they knew steps, ect. When I introduced pass pro, they knew what they were doing before I even had to say anything. Their technique still lacked, but the scheme made sense from an overall point of view for them. It was similar to the run game. If it was a man scheme protection, like our 3/5 step straight drop series, they knew who they were responsible for. If it was a zone scheme (half-slide/full-slide) they knew how to read the D [we used this on half-roll outs or full sprint series).

 

It worked quite well. It all made sense. It all paired together.

 

Who do you see as some members of the offensive line that need to be upgraded, especially knowing that Jay wants to run more than just the ZBS with our new offense?  I know we ran some power with Foerster (back to back against the Cowboys on one TD drive, even) but who are some guys that probably won't fit the bill to do both?

 

We ran power in 2012 a lot more often than 2013, and even more so earlier in the Shanahan tenure. In 2012, we really ran it at the goal line. That makes me sad :(

 

I think we can survive with Montgomery and Williams. Polumbus isn't bad in the run game, but his lack of overall agility hurts us in pass pro a bit. Lichtensteiger is small. Real small. And in 2012, when he had that high ankle sprain he was rendered almost totally useless as he didn't have size or mobility. If Lich can put on some weight and get a bit stronger, he could be a guy that can stay as a starter, but if not he could be a quality reserve at both G/C. Chester is the one guy that I think we definitely need to replace. I like Chester's game, but age is catching up to him. Maurice Hurt, if he can fill that role, will easily allow us to replace LG or RT as well, or both. Or perhaps Hurt can play a little RT. Foerster seems to like him. Either way, if he can fill one of those roles, we can upgrade at least one of the other two positions.

 

My list on the OL:

 

Definitive Replace: Right Guard.

Need to Upgrade Soon: Left Guard, Right Tackle (again, Lich could bulk up/get stronger and be okay. RT could have a solution already on the team).

 

And is this a good situation (in your opinion) for LeRibeus if he can get his act together in the offseason since he was rated as one of the two best pulling Guards in his draft class?

 

I don't know. I'm not high on LeRibeus. I know some here are, and are encouraged by Foerster's comments in an article, but I am not. I took it the other way. I read what he had to say about Gettis and Compton and saw praise. I saw what he said about LeRibeus and didn't come away with the same feeling. I will say this: If LeRibeus doesn't come into OTAs/camp in shape, or doesn't show he can roll with the big boys, I think he's as good as camp fodder. So, if there is ever a time for stepping up... It' now.

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I'm big on continuity within scheme. When I was a younger coach, I didn't understand the importance. As I get older and see the effects of continuity, I become more in favor of it. Before I left the HS position for college this past year, I designed a run/pass offense that our head coach was going to implement. He told me the main component he wanted, the power play. I based our run scheme and pass protections (he would draw up routes, I'd have say in QB's landmark/protection stuff) on keeping things coordinated.

 

Well said.  Probably the coolest thing I took away from the Gruden presser was when he said "I've never met a play that works that I didn't like," or something like that.  That shows me he will put us in position to win.  He also said that he likes our running game (as you've mentioned) but implied that he was going to build on it.

 

So long as he understands the flow of the game in his play calling I think we have a lot of good pieces in place and good principles in place as a basis for success.  Kyle called a lot of WRs open but the trenches were all goofed up.

 

My list on the OL:

 

Definitive Replace: Right Guard.

Need to Upgrade Soon: Left Guard, Right Tackle (again, Lich could bulk up/get stronger and be okay. RT could have a solution already on the team).

 

 

Definitely what I picked, too.  Chester was really beaten badly.  And I'm with you on Polumbus.  He may be a good back-up Guard, though.  He won't have to kick step as far to pass block, but that 6'8" frame may be a pain for Griffin when looking for a passing lane.  I will say if we can get a solid RG and RT this season we'll be in good shape.  And Lich definitely needs to gain some weight.  I'm rooting for Hurt to get some burn in camp, hopefully he is healthy.

 

I don't know. I'm not high on LeRibeus. I know some here are, and are encouraged by Foerster's comments in an article, but I am not. I took it the other way. I read what he had to say about Gettis and Compton and saw praise. I saw what he said about LeRibeus and didn't come away with the same feeling. I will say this: If LeRibeus doesn't come into OTAs/camp in shape, or doesn't show he can roll with the big boys, I think he's as good as camp fodder. So, if there is ever a time for stepping up... It' now.

 

 

 

I'm not very hopeful for him, either.  Foerster's comments on Ribs always read like he's upset about how Ribs is a waste of talent.  Instead of playing to his potential he frustrates.  Guys who aren't self-motivators don't last in this league.

 

If I'm John Keim or another worker, I do an expose piece on Ribs this week or next that discusses how this is really it for him.  And with a regime where a coach wants to start introducing power concepts, if I'm the best pulling guard from my draft class I realize this is my shot.  If it works, eh, fantastic, if it doesn't... oye.

 

One more exciting thing is in a lot of those power blocking schemes, PA passes to the FB can be available by the clip full.  DY could be instore for a banner season.

 

It's going to be interested to see which way we go, though.

 

Congrats on the new gig, btw, albeit late.  Didn't know you moved up to College Ball.  Much kudos and well deserved.

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Thanks guys. The more I learn, the more I realise I don't know.  :(

 

Oh, trust me man.  You'll NEVER learn all there is to coaching Football.  I'm sure Kdawg would agree.  Been coaching for 30 years and in my early years (usually after winning a Championship) I'd foolishly think I had this game figured out.  Then I'd go to a clinic and just be blown away at how many nuances and techniques there were yet to be learned. 

 

Most of us coaches are copy cats.  We'll see or hear something that someone's doing then tweak it and repackage it.  Or find a really cool idea for helping a player to get an edge.  Like something as simple as a db who's beat just lightly grabbing the receivers arm and sliding down to the wrist; then let go.  It's very subtle so rarely (almost never) gets called but can slow the receiver down just enough for you to catch up.  That technique is used an awful lot on Kick and Punt returns too. 

 

I take notes from everybody.  Especially Kdawg here.  I'm not too proud to use something that works!  The longer you coach this game the more you realize that you don't know jack and better do some studying if you wanna stay competitive! 

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If Lich could add weight I think he would have done so by now.

 

I think he was over 300 when he came in the league.

 

But remember two things:

 

1)  He is coming off an ACL (I believe)

 

2)  Some guys just don't like to play over a certain weight

 

Could be either or (or both).  I think he can put the weight on.  His frame supports it.

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I've always wondered about the concept that the ZBS needs athletic linemen.  I know that zone blocking was invented as a way to dominate with less athletic linemen.  Based on my playing days, I also feel that the part of the game where you need to be most athletic is pass pro.  You have to maintain technique and balance while reacting to the movements in your area and keep your head on a swivel.  There is nothing more embarrassing than having your QB drilled by a guy who ran past you while you blocked air.   "Coach, I kept MY zone clear" is not an acceptable excuse while the trainers are looking at your QB.

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The ZBS has similar rules for inside and outside zone, but they are very different in ways, too. Ours is a wide stretch which means we like to run with our OL to the landmark. Other teams like to go C-Gap, which requires less running (in realty, either way, the play ideally goes outside. Just the track is different. C-Gap track is tighter). Inside zone requires the ability to get off the ball and into the DL with less running. It's much more of a "square" play.

While we run IZ, it's in small increments. Very small. Our OZ and zone read schemes are our bread and butter, and our OL suits those quite well. The issue, again, is those guys, in the case of the Redskins aren't great at keeping the pocket in tact in the passing game. Especially on "straight" drops.

Our schemes aren't necessarily interconnected when it pertains to the personnel. I think they were fine in 2012 because it seemed like we ran more rollouts and Chester was a year younger when we did more drop back stuff.

I'd like to see us use a few more rollouts/moving pockets if we have a similar OL. If we have a revamped OL I'd like to see us play to that groups strengths.

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To clarify, the lack of agility/overall athleticism is part of the issue we have in pass protection. Our guys are somewhat quick and good with leverage in the run game as they are attacking. The need to anchor and adjust in pass protection, especially in the drop back game, is where we find issues.

 

As a running team, our OL is good. They do an overall nice job. As a drop back passing team, we're not great. We can improve in both areas with upgrades on the OL, which makes Morris' job easier. Upgrading at least one OL position via FA/Draft (high pick) is mandatory.

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Great discussion. All a long I have thought our OL is too small for power blocking which is what I thought was happening during simple 3-5 step drops, but our OL looked decent in zone blocking ie; the run. I guess I was somewhat wrong. But I did notice a difference between RG3's first year and RG3's second year as to the blocking and plays. To me it seemed they didn't utilize as many roll outs for RG3 which could have been due to his injury, but thats what worked in year one. He'd roll out and get away from the pressure and would not have DL in front of him to block his view or bat the ball.

 

I think defensively our opponants banked on RG3 not being as much of a runner due to his leg not being 100% and backed off to cover the pass better. Between that and for whatever reason the team using less roll outs the team made it easy for defenses. or so I thought.

 

About 3 or 4 things need to happen on offense,

1- better quality OL as other have said RG and RT.

2- RG3 needs to learn how to slide. He does this and anyone who hits him will give us a 15yrd penalty.

3- Need another pass catching fast TE. Although I love slow Paulsen. Paul needs to go he can't catch a cold.

4- Need another WR preferably one better then Garcon. Maybe thats Gettis IDK but he needs to stay healthy.

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